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2011 yz250 mods

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Depends on what you are using it for. I race vet intermediate MX and I sent my suspension to Factory Connection, put a PC pipe and silencer on it, black rims, stickered it out, and I couldn't be happier. Of course it all set me back about $1800 but I have one sweet bike now. The suspension is the biggest benefit for MX.

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i agree on the riding schools. the bike is REALLY good stock, suspension is good too if you weight around 175. need lots of skill to get all the bike has to offer right off the showroom floor. good jetting is key. retard the timing if you dont like the hit or are getting pinging from pump gas.

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jetting. Jet it properly. There is nothing like a crisp running bike. Suspension is pretty dam good out of box on this bike. Id just tune it to your weight and ride it. I tried a pipe on my 2011 yz 250. went back to stock. Good tires also make big difference. Love this bike. Very durable. Used mostly mx racinge

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go on a soup diet or by a 450..........................u r the exception to the rule..............ha.just kiddin........point being that the engine is awesome and if u need to mod it id keep it stock and get some springs and a revalve. i even like stock graphics. hate the modified graphics.....aka metal militia

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JD jet kit and number 8 slide. Then a Dave J, Smart Performance DIY shock and fork kit.

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I'm pretty much in line with the crowd too. Here's the list of mods in order of importance to me, a 165 lbs Vet-B MX racer:

1. Jetting (for your climate, fuel, riding style).

2. Suspension setup (tune the stock setup first)

If you're heavy or light, get springs and/or revalve depending on your budget.

3. Glide plate or skid plate (protect those expensive engine cases)

4. 51 tooth rear sprocket (for all but the biggest, fastest MX tracks)

5. HD tubes or Extra HD inner-tubes (trade weight for reliability)

6. Fork tube protector stickers (the thick clear KYB ones prevent dings/chips/dents)

7. Remove the countershaft sprocket plastic guard (keep the metal case saver)

That's all small stuff, but it adds up to a big improvement in maintenance and durability. Tune-whatchya-got first... A stock YZ with good jetting and the right suspension settngs is an amazing bike.

A few other things I've done:

-The stock front tire on my 2010 sucked (Dunlop 742FA). Not sure if they still come with that one.

-I like the PC Platinum and R304 setup a bit better than the stock exhaust, but the stock stuff is actually really good.

-I have a holeshot device but I haven't installed it yet... I've actually never tried one, but I know it will help my starts.

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Depends on what you are doing of course but the reason I bought the YZ 250 a couple of years ago was because it needed very little.

I'm vet expert enduro rider and I bought Race Tech lighter compression springs to soften the initial 4 inches of travel, lighter suspension oil, guarding and that's it.

Later I added the FMF Stealth Q exhaust to be complient for noise and spark arrestor for our race series.

For me the out of the box bike was pretty stellar and only a few thousand $'s less :smashpc: than my KTM riding buddies. Yes I don't have a hydraulic clutch but I can live with that.

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I'm pretty much in line with the crowd too. Here's the list of mods in order of importance to me, a 165 lbs Vet-B MX racer:

1. Jetting (for your climate, fuel, riding style).

2. Suspension setup (tune the stock setup first)

If you're heavy or light, get springs and/or revalve depending on your budget.

3. Glide plate or skid plate (protect those expensive engine cases)

4. 51 tooth rear sprocket (for all but the biggest, fastest MX tracks)

5. HD tubes or Extra HD inner-tubes (trade weight for reliability)

6. Fork tube protector stickers (the thick clear KYB ones prevent dings/chips/dents)

7. Remove the countershaft sprocket plastic guard (keep the metal case saver)

That's all small stuff, but it adds up to a big improvement in maintenance and durability. Tune-whatchya-got first... A stock YZ with good jetting and the right suspension settngs is an amazing bike.

A few other things I've done:

-The stock front tire on my 2010 sucked (Dunlop 742FA). Not sure if they still come with that one.

-I like the PC Platinum and R304 setup a bit better than the stock exhaust, but the stock stuff is actually really good.

-I have a holeshot device but I haven't installed it yet... I've actually never tried one, but I know it will help my starts.

I'd agree with cwtoyota except for the glide/skid plate and the HD tubes. Unless your local track is rocky, the glide plate just makes things vibrate like hell. The HD tubes add a TON of un-sprung weight. Unless you are flat-prone, I'd avoid those. BUT, if you are riding where there are rocks and roots, I'd do both of those.

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I'd agree with cwtoyota except for the glide/skid plate and the HD tubes. Unless your local track is rocky, the glide plate just makes things vibrate like hell. The HD tubes add a TON of un-sprung weight. Unless you are flat-prone, I'd avoid those. BUT, if you are riding where there are rocks and roots, I'd do both of those

All true.

You can use some rubber to isolate the frame / glide plate... It's not a 100% cure though. Factory Connection now makes rubber mounts for their plates as well.

The HD tubes are a trade off; unsprung weight for stupid flat resistance.

I have a set of Tubliss, but I haven't installed them yet. If they live up to the hype, they'll reduce unsprung weight and eliminate the chance of pinch flats.

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