Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Some newbie rear brake issues.

Recommended Posts

So my question is on the rear caliper (this question can pertain to the front I think also) but I installed new brake pads on my bike last night after I finally came to the conclusion my trusty 9.95$ RockymountainATV pads were coming to the end of their lives with only about 1/16"of pad left.

Upon putting the new pads in, I had to let some fluid out of the caliper to get the piston to retract far enough to give me room fo put both pads and have room for the rotor, and barely having room for my rotor...

Thus bringing me to my question, what's the trick to make the caliper move smoothly from side to side (in essence, what allows the caliper to center over the rotor). IDK if where is crud or something on the rods it slides on or not?

My caliper does not for some reason want to center over the rotor very easily after I put these new pads on. Is this a quick fix by cleaning the rods that caliper can move on?

Went for a quick ride and the rotor was smoking hot cause it was rubbing the left pad (one that does not touch piston) the whole time. Which makes me think that the caliper is not moving/centering all the way over enough.

It's one of those it worked before I put the new stuff on it haha :smashpc:

Could be super simple just in need of some cleaning or something. Again it was late and I didn't spend much time looking for the root cause but just figured I'd ask so when I get home today I can hopefully try a few of the ideas I get from you all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like slides may be siezed. If you can get apart and clean up a little it should be fine. If so lubricate with some moly brake grease such as sta-lube P/N SL3303

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what I thought. That the pins the caliper "floats" on are stuck or just won't slide easily or need a little sandpaper/lube put on them.

I read somewhere that they seemed to think it shouldn't sieze this way, most of the time it's the piston but idk?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dirt and water get in there pretty easily seen it happen many times and know one ever thinks to peridically clean and lubricate them....including me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never personally taken the caliper off either to clean those pins. I guess it's a simple unscrewing one pin and sliding the caliper off the other one due to it looks like it's fixed on caliper mount..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've never personally taken the caliper off either to clean those pins. I guess it's a simple unscrewing one pin and sliding the caliper off the other one due to it looks like it's fixed on caliper mount..

can't exactly remember I usually wear the bike out before the brakes so its been a while since I've had any apart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

separate the caliper from the bracket, get all of the buildup off of the slider pins, clean out the holes the pins slide in with an appropriately sized gun bore brush, flush everything out thoroughly with brake cleaner, grease the pins with a good, high temp silicone brake grease, grease the track on the swingarm as well, should be set if you do all of this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
separate the caliper from the bracket, get all of the buildup off of the slider pins, clean out the holes the pins slide in with an appropriately sized gun bore brush, flush everything out thoroughly with brake cleaner, grease the pins with a good, high temp silicone brake grease, grease the track on the swingarm as well, should be set if you do all of this.

Yes, definitely grease the pins. If the pins are dry, and have dirt and whatever else all caked up on it, that is just that much more friction the pistons have to overcome to press the pads against the rotor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's what I thought. That the pins the caliper "floats" on are stuck or just won't slide easily or need a little sandpaper/lube put on them.

I read somewhere that they seemed to think it shouldn't sieze this way, most of the time it's the piston but idk?

If the pins are already a little worn, I would just go ahead and buy new pins....they are cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, I now see the problem... Letting a rookie mechanic put in your brand new brake pads... Took out the pads today and noticed that one had gotten in a bind and bend one of the tabs and cracked off part of the pad from the short test ride I did.

Don't ask me how that happened. I didn't install them, Needless to say he's banned from working on my bike lol...

The following saying IS NOT TRUE:

" Installing brake pads on a crf450r is soo easy, a caveman could do it!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...