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'01 CR250 fork center bolt

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I'm trying to do my fork seals and don't have an impact...I put the fork in a vice and used a big breaker bar and 21mm socket to break the bolt loose...I applied a bunch of PB blaster to it and let it soak and still it won't budge...after putting all my strength into a 2 foot breaker bar the edges rounded a tad and the bolt still won't move...if I find an impact to break the bolt loose will I run the risk of fully rounding the bolt off? I can't imagine that it would be this tight...a replacement is like $75 bucks!

Its the center bolt at the bottom of the fork

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all he does is skip to "now we've got the center bolt loose"

i took apart my fork because the adjuster at the bottom was free spinning (it wasn't threaded on the damper rod...and i'm not sure but i don't think a tool is needed to remove the center bolt on twin chambers...maybe im wrong?

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i have the forked holding tool, but since my damper rod wasn't threaded to my center bolt i'm just trying to get the center bolt off/out

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lefty loosey in this case. A breaker bar should get it started. if not apply heat to the outer fork lug

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+1 for heating it ... i was just trying to understand which point you were having trouble removing it

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6 point socket...tons of pb blaster...impact....both are rounded...I think the last guy that did them used a 400+ ft/lb impact and no anti-seize...musta been a c student @ ami

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damn that sux ya give it a shot ...worst case see if a machine shop gat cut the bolt close enough to the threads to break it off

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6 point socket...tons of pb blaster...impact....both are rounded...I think the last guy that did them used a 400+ ft/lb impact and no anti-seize...musta been a c student @ ami

Take it to a machine shop and have it removed. Get a new hex bolt and assemble it correctly. There is a electric craftsman impact wrench that works well for motorcycles. The max is around 75 foot pounds so it does not damage anything. Works well for fly wheel bolts and motorcycle forks. Nice to have around. Good luck.

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Take it to a machine shop and have it removed. Get a new hex bolt and assemble it correctly. There is a electric craftsman impact wrench that works well for motorcycles. The max is around 75 foot pounds so it does not damage anything. Works well for fly wheel bolts and motorcycle forks. Nice to have around. Good luck.

It's not just a bolt, its a $75 replacement piece for each...

hacked_center_boltSmall.jpg

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Ouch. For $75x2, I'd take a file and shape it back into a usable hex shape.

A 13/16ths socket will be a tight fit but will work and grip better.

These aren't high torque, so they don't have to be perfect.

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yep to that! if your 13/16 socket slips too, then mash it down into some valve-grinding paste to take up some slack and add some grip. 6-point sockets have more bite, btw. and spin the outer fork tube while heating it all around, to get the outer tube hot enuff to expand BEFORE the basevalve gets hot and swells too.

The basevalve does NOT have to be very tight at all. It would take years for the thing to spin all the way out.

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6 point sockets will save you a lot of grief and money.

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6 point snap-on 21mm socket with a breaker bar in a vise with soft jaws tightened as hard as I could get it and it rounded before it would budge

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6 point snap-on 21mm socket with a breaker bar in a vise with soft jaws tightened as hard as I could get it and it rounded before it would budge

Yeah, I've rounded one before, "P.O. must have put it on with a impact" was what I thought too, who knows but they sure are soft once they start to go.

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When you have one that is tight like that, put your socket on a short extension, then wack it with a hammer a couple of times before attempting to loosen the bolt. The shock will often free the bolt up.

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