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An important message to Husqvarna Management

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This was a piece that Guy Kawasaki did on Steve Jobs and was posted over on CNET today... maybe Husqvarna should thiink about emulating these points if they choose to be a player again: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-20117575-37/what-i-learned-from-steve-jobs/

What I learned from Steve Jobs

By: Guy Kawasaki OCTOBER 8, 2011 8:33 AM PDT

Guy Kawasaki guest column Many people have explained what one can learn from Steve Jobs. But few, if any, of these people have been inside the tent and experienced first hand what it was like to work with him. I don’t want any lessons to be lost or forgotten, so here is my list of the top 12 lessons I learned from Steve Jobs.

1. Experts are clueless Experts—journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus can’t “do” so they “advise.” They can tell you what is wrong with your product, but they cannot make a great one. They can tell you how to sell something, but they cannot sell it themselves. They can tell you how to create great teams, but they only manage a secretary. For example, the experts told us that the two biggest shortcomings of Macintosh in the mid 1980s were the lack of a daisy-wheel printer driver and Lotus 1-2-3; another advice gem from the experts was to buy Compaq. Hear what experts say, but don’t always listen to them.

2. Customers cannot tell you what they need“Apple market research” is an oxymoron. The Apple focus group was the right hemisphere of Steve’s brain talking to the left one. If you ask customers what they want, they will tell you, “Better, faster, and cheaper”—that is, better sameness, not revolutionary change. They can describe their desires only in terms of what they are already using—around the time of the introduction of Macintosh, all that people said they wanted was a better, faster, and cheaper MS-DOS machine. The richest vein for tech startups is creating the product that you want to use—that’s what Steve and Woz did.

3. Jump to the next curve

Big wins happen when you go beyond better sameness. The best daisy-wheel printer companies were introducing new fonts in more sizes. Apple introduced the next curve: laser printing. Think of ice harvesters, ice factories, and refrigerator companies. Ice 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0. Are you still harvesting ice during the winter from a frozen pond?

4. The biggest challenges beget best work I lived in fear that Steve would tell me that I, or my work, was crap. In public. This fear was a big challenge. Competing with IBM and then Microsoft was a big challenge. Changing the world was a big challenge. I, and Apple employees before me and after me, did our best work because we had to do our best work to meet the big challenges.

5. Design counts Steve drove people nuts with his design demands—some shades of black weren’t black enough. Mere mortals think that black is black, and that a trash can is a trash can. Steve was a perfectionist, and he was right: some people care about design and many people at least sense it. Maybe not everyone, but the important ones.

6. You can’t go wrong with big graphics and big fonts Take a look at Steve’s slides. The font is 60 points. There’s usually one big screenshot or graphic. Look at other tech speaker’s slides—even the ones who have seen Steve in action. The font is 8 points, and there are no graphics. So many people say that Steve was the world’s greatest product introduction guy. Don’t you wonder why more people don’t copy his style?

7. Changing your mind is a sign of intelligence When Apple first shipped the iPhone there was no such thing as apps. Apps, Steve decreed, were a bad thing because you never know what they could be doing to your phone. Safari Web apps were the way to go until six months later when Steve decided, or someone convinced him, that apps were the way to go—but of course. Duh! Apple came a long way in a short time from Safari Web apps to “there’s an app for that.”

8. “Value” is different from “price”

Woe unto you if you decide everything based on price. Even more woe unto you if you compete solely on price. Price is not all that matters—what is important, at least to some people, is value. And value takes into account training, support, and the intrinsic joy of using the best tool that’s made. It’s pretty safe to say that no one buys Apple products because of their low price.

9. A players hire A+ players Actually, Steve believed that A players hire A players—that is people who are as good as they are. I refined this slightly—my theory is that A players hire people even better than themselves. It’s clear, though, that B players hire C players so they can feel superior to them, and C players hire D players. If you start hiring B players, expect what Steve called “the bozo explosion” to happen in your organization.

10. Real CEOs demo Steve Jobs could demo a 'Pod, 'Pad, 'Phone, and Mac two to three times a year with millions of people watching, why is it that many CEOs call on their vice president of engineering to do a product demo? Maybe it’s to show that there’s a team effort in play. Maybe. It’s more likely that the CEO doesn’t understand what his/her company is making well enough to explain it. How pathetic is that?

11. Real CEOs ship For all his perfectionism, Steve could ship. Maybe the product wasn’t perfect every time, but it was almost always great enough to go. The lesson is that Steve wasn’t tinkering for the sake of tinkering—he had a goal: shipping and achieving worldwide domination of existing markets or creation of new markets. Apple is an engineering-centric company, not a research-centric one. Which would you rather be: Apple or Xerox PARC?

12. Marketing boils down to providing unique value Think of a two-by-two matrix. The vertical axis measures how your product differs from the competition. The horizontal axis measures the value of your product. Bottom right: valuable but not unique—you’ll have to compete on price. Top left: unique but not valuable—you’ll own a market that doesn’t exist. Bottom left: not unique and not valuable—you’re a bozo. Top right: unique and valuable—this is where you make margin, money, and history. For example, the iPod was unique and valuable because it was the only way to legally, inexpensively, and easily download music from the six biggest record labels.

Bonus: Some things need to be believed to be seen. When you are jumping curves, defying/ignoring the experts, facing off against big challenges, obsessing about design, and focusing on unique value, you will need to convince people to believe in what you are doing in order to see your efforts come to fruition. People needed to believe in Macintosh to see it become real. Ditto for the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad. Not everyone will believe—that’s OK. But the starting point of changing the world is changing a few minds. This is the greatest lesson of all that I learned from Steve. May he rest in peace knowing how much he changed the world

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-13579_3-20117575-37/what-i-learned-from-steve-jobs/#ixzz1aDSu1bSE

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This will translate to motorcycles quite well... :ride:

:worthy::thumbsup:

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HR is going to rip this management team until they re-locate back to the east coast.

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Why everybody knows the left cost has it all figured out.......jk.

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What I learned from Steve Jobs

By: Guy Kawasaki OCTOBER 8, 2011 8:33 AM PDT

1. Experts are clueless Experts—journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus can’t “do” so they “advise.” They can tell you what is wrong with your product, but they cannot make a great one. They can tell you how to sell something, but they cannot sell it themselves. They can tell you how to create great teams, but they only manage a secretary.

You don't need to be a brilliant composer to know bad music when you hear it.

But there are clueless people that will tell you all the reasons why you can't do something. And then you can go do it by being innovative in your approach and doing it in new ways no one had thought of.

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This will translate to motorcycles quite well... :ride:

:worthy::thumbsup:

Actually it translates to all successful businesses and that's why Apple is the company it is today.

Can you imagine where Apple would be today if they copied Microsoft?

Kind of like Husqvarna and KTM if you know what I mean.

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You don't need to be a brilliant composer to know bad music when you hear it.

But there are clueless people that will tell you all the reasons why you can't do something. And then you can go do it by being innovative in your approach and doing it in new ways no one had thought of.

No re read point number #2 that's more to the point...

2. Customers cannot tell you what they need

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HR is going to rip this management team until they re-locate back to the east coast.

No not at all... Husqvarna being in California is a good thing!

The problem is you either position yourself as a leader... or you become a follower.... and right now Husqvarna is playing follower.

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While I agree with the message I'm afraid there is a BIG difference between the forces and physics of a great motorcycle, and the marketing of electronic gadgets.

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No re read point number #2 that's more to the point...

2. Customers cannot tell you what they need

Experts are not necessarily customers. Guy was referring to advisors, journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus.

Gurus, etc can provide valuable input, but politicians shouldn't change their stance based on polls, and experts should only be used for guidance. It's important to know when and when NOT to listen to them.

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Can you imagine where Apple would be today if they copied Microsoft?.

Like using their processors directly, oh yeah they do that. Or like needing their programs so they need software to emulate Windows... oh yeah they do that.

Apple is a good company, innovative for sure. So is BMW. I see a lot of similarities actually. Thinking outside the box and bring to market what others will not. (Alternative front suspension, ABS, EFI, single sides shaft drive with linkage to remove jacking, etc) I recently moved away from Apple products cuz i hate how locked down they are, the lack of all the stuff I needed and forced to use CRAP like iTunes on my phone. I moved from an iPhone to a Droid and could not be more happy. They are innovative and come out with some cool stuff and are a great company, so is BMW / Husky IMHO.

BTW bikes are here and husky NA is bring a small pile of 2012 out for us customers to sample in a few weeks, get to ride almost all models. COOL!!! I'll say it again, IMHO and from where I sit / am directly effected, husky NA is kicking butt, better than ever.

And BTW Steve liked / owned vintage BMW's :thumbsup:

jobs_bmw-655x527.jpg

Edited by Ride

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Gurus, etc can provide valuable input, but politicians shouldn't change their stance based on polls, and experts should only be used for guidance. It's important to know when and when NOT to listen to them.

I like that line of thinking. :thumbsup:

Well except "politicians shouldn't change their stance based on polls" as they are supposed to represent the people.

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Like using their processors directly, oh yeah they do that. Or like needing their programs so they need software to emulate Windows... oh yeah they do that.

Microsoft has never made processors.

Microsoft has developed software for Apple long before they ever shipped MS-DOS and still does.

Microsoft stole MS-DOS (CPM anyone?)

Microsoft has never really been an innovator. Apple has built their business on innovation since the Apple II.

There are benefits and drawbacks to a closed platform or an open one. Bear in mind that Windows is not entirely open. Windows isn't open source. Android no longer is, either. Closed source allows control of consistency, which is a key part of a good user interface. The closed platform of the iPhone ensures good security (unlike Android). Closed also means you control the hardware, so you have less compatibility issues and driver problems. But it means less competition... you can only get an Apple iPhone, but half a dozen mfgs make various Droid models. So there's less choice.

That battle already happened with PCs and Macs, although the PC shipped in 1981, from IBM, the juggernaut of business computing at the time. That set the PC up with a very solid installed base by the time the Mac shipped in 1984. Things are different with the iPhone and Droid. The iPhone shipped first and it defined the modern smartphone market. Apple may have a chance to retain a strong market share, although I think the wider choice for Droids will give it the majority share.

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Microsoft has never made processors.

Microsoft has developed software for Apple long before they ever shipped MS-DOS and still does.

Microsoft stole MS-DOS (CPM anyone?)

Microsoft has never really been an innovator. Apple has built their business on innovation since the Apple II.

There are benefits and drawbacks to a closed platform or an open one. Bear in mind that Windows is not entirely open. Windows isn't open source. Android no longer is, either. Closed source allows control of consistency, which is a key part of a good user interface. The closed platform of the iPhone ensures good security (unlike Android). Closed also means you control the hardware, so you have less compatibility issues and driver problems. But it means less competition... you can only get an Apple iPhone, but half a dozen mfgs make various Droid models. So there's less choice.

That battle already happened with PCs and Macs, although the PC shipped in 1981, from IBM, the juggernaut of business computing at the time. That set the PC up with a very solid installed base by the time the Mac shipped in 1984. Things are different with the iPhone and Droid. The iPhone shipped first and it defined the modern smartphone market. Apple may have a chance to retain a strong market share, although I think the wider choice for Droids will give it the majority share.

My bad on the processors, was thinking Intel as they are so tied together it seems.

Rest of your post is good info. And yes, MS steals or buys everything.

My dislike for Apple stuff started when i worked at Fastway, they were all Mac guys. I brought my PC in as I had AutoCAD on it and could not be run on a Mac at the time as well as a pile of other software I used. Then they needed a bar code generator for our products. $400 SW "solution" for the MAC or 20-30 free programs downloaded off Cnet for free for the PC. I got to do bar code stickers. Then everyone saw me playing Motocross madness and wanted to play, can't do that on a MAC so eveyone played on my $300 PC. Everyone in there told me how superior the Mac platform was but it did nothing but cost a ton and not run anything i needed. My PC never crashed but the Macs were crashing all the time and half the time would not print as they could not find some airsever thing. i personally just never saw what made them better and I know my solution was cheaper and did about anything i could dream of.

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My dislike for Apple stuff...

Back then, just as now, Macs weren't the choice for everyone. They're best suited to simple tasks like barcode scanners. Why spend more money on a nice system if you just need it to do a simple, mundane task?

My experience through the years has been about the opposite of yours. I'm a computer professional and have always worked on all platforms. But for my personal use, the Mac has always been the best choice for me.

We could go back and forth on this until doomsday, there is no end to the PC vs Mac wars. The reason why is there is no single solution that fits everyone. PCs are great for many people, Macs are better for others.

All I can say is, I'm very sad that Steve Jobs is gone. He lit a fire under the ass of the tech industry. He shook things up, made people think outside the norm. And there's no one to take his place in the industry. I hope it isn't too long before there is someone that can.

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All I can say is, I'm very sad that Steve Jobs is gone. He lit a fire under the ass of the tech industry. He shook things up, made people think outside the norm. And there's no one to take his place in the industry. I hope it isn't too long before there is someone that can.

:thumbsup:

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Like using their processors directly, oh yeah they do that. Or like needing their programs so they need software to emulate Windows... oh yeah they do that.

Apple is a good company, innovative for sure. So is BMW. I see a lot of similarities actually. Thinking outside the box and bring to market what others will not. (Alternative front suspension, ABS, EFI, single sides shaft drive with linkage to remove jacking, etc) I recently moved away from Apple products cuz i hate how locked down they are, the lack of all the stuff I needed and forced to use CRAP like iTunes on my phone. I moved from an iPhone to a Droid and could not be more happy. They are innovative and come out with some cool stuff and are a great company, so is BMW / Husky IMHO.

BTW bikes are here and husky NA is bring a small pile of 2012 out for us customers to sample in a few weeks, get to ride almost all models. COOL!!! I'll say it again, IMHO and from where I sit / am directly effected, husky NA is kicking butt, better than ever.

And BTW Steve liked / owned vintage BMW's :thumbsup:

jobs_bmw-655x527.jpg

Husky NA kicking butt!!! Thats laughable.

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Husky NA kicking butt!!! Thats laughable.

" IMHO and from where I sit / am directly effected"

- I have had some direct needs and action taken by husky NA, was handled VERY well and turned out great. i did not get this kind of service before.

- Husky has 2012 bikes out in sept, i have not seen this in many years

- Husky is bringing a truck full of 2012 models for some of us int he NW to try out at our unofficial gathering. never seen this before

- Local dealer is VERY happy with husky NA and finds them very responsive to his needs. I'll take his word for it and he is a top dealer

- I have seen more coverage and press than ever in the last year or 2.

- Seems more teams (Ty, FAR etc) than ever with factory support

- TE250 low is specifically from the dealers in the NA asking for it last year.

I have been following husky for 12 years and this is the best I have personally seen. If your unhappy for some reason maybe it's just better in the NW. As stated, this is my personal feelings and direct reasons for, your mileage my vary.

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