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Right hand turn help

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Alright, riding season is winding down for me here in NE Ohio...I'm not where I was hoping to be by this point in the season, but I have made some improvement in the areas I struggled most with last year (gapped jumps and ruts) and I have gotten pretty decent at left hand turns, managed to get to the top of second in this big left hander at a track I frequent; last year at this time I was idling through it. (the fast guys claim it is a mid-third gear turn)

But this is the problem: I can't get myself to lay the bike over to the right like I can to the left. Why is this? I see a decent left hand turn, even if it's flat, and I feel confident enough to twist the gas, stick my leg out, and slide my butt to the right side of the seat, letting the bike "do it's thing".

But on a right hander, I lock up; the best I can do is to get the rear end of the bike to break free, but as soon as it does, I'm off the gas and tucking my leg in...no good. Somebody help me out...as it stands I can only go left. This is MX, not NASCAR!

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Find a patch of land to make yourself a small figure 8 track that will force you to switch form left to right hand turns in fast order. I created one for my son and I find myself droppin on that thing and sharpening the turning skills. Just get away from a busy track and find a place to work at your skill set. Right handers can be tricky because of the rear brake situation. You want to brake sooner and get on the gas sooner than on a left hander.

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this is a good idea. I'll look around in the woods behind my house for an opening; something to try and rip into shape.

It makes sense about the rear brake availability in right handers. Maybe it's the psychological side of it, knowing that I can't as easily get at it if I need to. I dunno, it drives me nuts though. I feel confident in left handers, not so much in right handers.

Edited by hodgey450

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Historically right handers have been considered tougher than left hand turns in mx. My feeling is that the advantage you have with the right hand turn is you can grab a gear anytime, you just cant drag the brake though the turn like you can with a lefty. So the trade off to me is to hit the throttle sooner and grab the next gear quickly.

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Alright, riding season is winding down for me here in NE Ohio...I'm not where I was hoping to be by this point in the season, but I have made some improvement in the areas I struggled most with last year (gapped jumps and ruts) and I have gotten pretty decent at left hand turns, managed to get to the top of second in this big left hander at a track I frequent; last year at this time I was idling through it. (the fast guys claim it is a mid-third gear turn)

But this is the problem: I can't get myself to lay the bike over to the right like I can to the left. Why is this? I see a decent left hand turn, even if it's flat, and I feel confident enough to twist the gas, stick my leg out, and slide my butt to the right side of the seat, letting the bike "do it's thing".

But on a right hander, I lock up; the best I can do is to get the rear end of the bike to break free, but as soon as it does, I'm off the gas and tucking my leg in...no good. Somebody help me out...as it stands I can only go left. This is MX, not NASCAR!

Most riders have one direction they're better at. Figure out exactly what you are doing technique wise to the left and then practice it to the rght. Set up and circle then an oval and keep practicing it to the right. Soon you'll have it down.

Rattray R corner.jpg

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Thanks for that! I'll be starting to clear an area for an oval/circle in here pretty soon. Found a decent enough flat spot about 50'x30' in the valley section of the woods out back. Looking forward to getting this dialed!

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small update: ended up tying in the practice area I was carving into the rest of the trail that runs the perimeter of the woods; so basically I have the option to make a series of right-handers around the "course", or left-handers. There is 2 flat turns, 2 rutted turns, and 1 mean-ass, tree root-covered sweeper. I hate this turn, left or right. I try to practice them like I would if I was at the track, even though I'm in the woods...

I've been running the same turns to the right as i do to the left, and one thing sticks out in mind when doing this. I seem to be further back on the bike when turning to the left, and more forward on the bike "attempting" to go right. I wish I could just chuck the bike over to the right like I can to the left.

I know I'm over-thinking this (one of the many side effects of working with engineers 10 hours a day:busted:) but the body position location on the bike is not my imagination. Any suggestions or explanations on that?

Thanks for the pointers, one and all.

Edited by hodgey450

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Mentioned before I practise on a sand-track so falling is no biggy. I have the same issue with right-turns. My lefts I'm pretty stoked about after my first season, but my rights frankly pmo. :)

In the sand at my last practise day I finally got agitated enough that I threw caution to the wind and accepted that I was going to fall; layed the bike over and managed to get through it by hook or by crook. I managed to get 'the feel' after a couple of stubborn attempts and one lay-over. I think doing it once successfully was huge, and being on a track where failure didn't likely equal injury was a big help.

Got any sand-tracks nearby? :lol:

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Most riders do have one prefered direction and for most riders it's to the left. One thing that makes lefts a little easier is the brake being on the left. But it all comes down to the way you practice. The best thing you can do alone is to figure out exactly what you do to the left and then slow it down and practice the same thing to the right.

I hope this helps,

GS

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I recently spent a considerable amount of time analyzing this exact issue to determine if I had a problem with left vs right corners and it seems that I for sure do. For me, the problem is very much related to my body and not the bike.

I find during right hand corners, I can rail them no problem because I'm constantly looking at the exit, but on the left hand corners, for some reason, I'm not comfortable enough to look at the exit. Where I'm looking at is a mystery I still haven't solved yet, but I'm a righty and that for sure could be part of the issue and why I'm not looking ahead on left hand corners.

In terms of the physical act of taking the corners, I look identical when I take corners, either left or right, I can feel a difference for sure.

I think track time is the key, figure 8's and stuff are kool, but translating that to the track is a different story, especially when you add speed.

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