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CR250R 1993' Maintenance

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I'm completely new to the whole maintenance thing, If someone could help me out through everything that would be a great help. I'm buying a CR250R 1993' for $1000 AUSD and this is the situation (from what I've been told by him)

He's had the bike for 2 years, the bike was ridden a lot for about a year, and hasn't been ridden since last november. He said the bike hasn't been given a rebuild since he bought it, yet still has good compression (does this mean I don't need to rebuild it? I don't know how to do it myself) The clutch is getting bad and parts on the bike are getting stiff from sitting. The fairing is faded.

What do you guys think by the sounds of it? What do I need to look for when looking at the bike? Whats the first thing I should do once I've bought the bike?

I don't ride very often, maybe 3-4 times a year for maybe 5-10hrs each time so I won't get much use out of the bike.

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How do you know if the bike has good compression? Have you put a compression gauge on the motor or just going "by feel". Until you put a gauge in the engine you will not really know if you have good compression.

If the clutch is wearing out I can virtually guarantee that the top end is probably pretty worn and is probably needing a rebuild.

From your description I would say that $1000 AU is probably overpriced looking from a USA point of view.

Like it or not a 1993 CR250 is going to need more work and parts than what you think when you first look at the bike.

I will bet that the rear shock bumper is dry rotted or completely missing the rear shock probably needs a rebuild. When you bounce on the rear suspension is it like a pogo stick or does it have any dampening.

The front forks probably have leaking seals and the forks need at least new fork fluid.

The brake pads may be worn or at their service life. Take a look at the brake fluid, probably straw yellow and since the bike has been sitting the master cylinders and brake calipers may need rebuilding.

Take a look at the chain sliders on the swing arm. They may be missing or worn out, same with the chain guide.

Silencer probably need repacking.

Look closely at the tires and rims. Are the rims dented? What do the spokes look and feel like? Any missing spokes?

The tires may be dry rotted or worn out. Plan on new tires since the bike has sat so long.

Does the rear suspension linkage have any play in it? Does it squeak when you compress or release the suspension?

I would do the following since the bike has sat:

-pull air cleaner, clean and re-oil with motorcycle air filter oil. After this many years I would probably just buy a new air filter. Air filters start to deteriorate and when they do dirt gets past them, destroying your motor. Air filters are CHEAP.

-drain all gas from tank, throughly rinse tank with water and allow to dry

completely before re-filling with new pre-mix

-pull carburetor, completely clean, while carb is off, pull reed block and inspect reeds to make sure they are not worn out or chipping

-change spark plug, make certain new plug is correct type and specification

-drain all coolant and replace with a high quality motorcycle type coolant. I do not use automotive type coolants, they do have additives that may not be compatible with motorcycle cooling systems.

-drain transmission and replace oil with motorcycle type trans oil. DO NOT use auto only oil in the gear box, it will make your clutch slip. As noted Honda makes a quality trans oil. use it.

-check tire pressures and adjust as necessary

-I would pull the brake calipers off and inspect the brake pads, I would also go ahead and change the front and rear brake fluid by bleeding the brakes. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, therefore it absorbs moisture from the atmosphere. If you ever see a motorcycle master cylinder with anything other than CLEAR brake fluid you can be sure that the brake fluid has gone bad. After sitting for years the brake fluid has absorbed at least some moisture, change it, it is cheap and easy.

-pull the front and rear wheels off, inspect and re-grease the wheel bearings. To be honest EVERY old bike that I buy and plan on riding I change the front and rear wheel bearings. A set of wheel bearings is CHEAP. Having a front or rear hub get destroyed from a bearing going bad is EXPENSIVE. It can also strand you on the trail. NOT FUN.

One of the BEST tools I ever purchased was a wheel bearing puller set. I thought I might only use it once or twice, I was wrong I find myself using the tool 5 or 6 times a year! What was once a chore is now a 1 minute operation.

I got my wheel bearing puller here:

http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/pr...FamilyId=20342

-check your front and rear spokes. Who knows when the last time they were checked or tightened.

-oil your chain and inspect the swing arm slider(s) frame rollers and swingarm chain guide, also inspect the front and rear sprockets. If they are worn, replace.

-Pull off the rear suspension and grease all the suspension components; swingarm bearings, suspension linkage, shock mounting points, rear axle. It is a good idea to pull those items off anyway as water gets into those linkage points and can corrode the bearings. Last thing you want is the bearings to seize up which can make disassembly VERY difficult.

-Pull off the front triple clamps and inspect and re-grease the front triple clamp bearings. I can't tell you how many times I have pulled off triple clamps and found dry bearings.

The bike should be pretty much ready to ride after this. Yes, it SEEMS like a lot of work but if you do it one step at a time over a week period or so it goes by rather quickly.

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all sound advice big paul but that much info to a newcomer to maintainance could be overkill. id advise him to seek basic advice on the state of the motor,if its got a tight crank and gearbox give her rings. theyre though machines i saw a mate buy one against my advice with a silightly loose bigend. i kept an eye on it ride after ride and it never got worse, even after long hours screaming around forrestry. stil with your aproach to maintainance i bet your collection af bikes are excellent to ride

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Thank you soo much Paul!

I don't know much myself like I said, if my Dad where still here I'd have someone to show me everything, but I'm on my own now. I would love to find out how to do all that stuff, I'm thinking of doing a motorbike course to find out rebuilds on 2 strokes and general maintenance if that's possible, it would really help me out.

Do you think I should get a service on the bike first thing? You seem to know EVERYTHING about bikes, drumbrake is right, I know next to nothing, but I could give it a crack at cleaning the air filter. Don't you just unscrew bolts on fairing? then leave the air filter in soapy water, then let it dry and put it back in when it's dry or something? :S complete noob here :/ sorry. I think my best bet right now is taking it in for a service as I know nothing. I think If I took out the carby or something I would be clueless of what to do and how to put it back in etc. Where abouts should I purchase my parts like rebuild kits and even tools? (Again, I have next to no tools in the shed, apart from a basic tools kit) ebay? local store?

I don't race motocross, but does that guide look like a good idea to follow?

http://www.motocross-racing-tips.com/motocross_gear.html

I'm plannning on buying: secondhand jersey and pants, Fox chest protector and Fox Kidney belts for $100 AUSD

Also, with the faded fairing, is it a good or bad idea to repaint the guards and fenders just to give it a better look? Maybe painting the frame black as well was what I was thinking. Would it be better to just buy new plastics?

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Honda-Owners-Manual-1993-CR250R-CR250-/290436342408?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item439f5ae288#ht_500wt_969

Good idea buying a manual from the US? I live in Australia, better idea to go into my local store and ask for one?

https://www.slipstreamperformance.com.au/store/product_info.php?products_id=21432

I've been told Wiseco are the best for rebuild kits. When I need one does that sound like the kit I should buy?

Also remember I have a car to run, I am trying not to spend too much money on this bike. At the moment it sounds like it will be a bit of work :/

Edited by Foleyy

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Thank you soo much Paul!

I don't know much myself like I said, if my Dad where still here I'd have someone to show me everything, but I'm on my own now. I would love to find out how to do all that stuff, I'm thinking of doing a motorbike course to find out rebuilds on 2 strokes and general maintenance if that's possible, it would really help me out.

Do you think I should get a service on the bike first thing? You seem to know EVERYTHING about bikes, drumbrake is right, I know next to nothing, but I could give it a crack at cleaning the air filter. Don't you just unscrew bolts on fairing? then leave the air filter in soapy water, then let it dry and put it back in when it's dry or something? :S complete noob here :/ sorry. I think my best bet right now is taking it in for a service as I know nothing. I think If I took out the carby or something I would be clueless of what to do and how to put it back in etc. Where abouts should I purchase my parts like rebuild kits and even tools? (Again, I have next to no tools in the shed, apart from a basic tools kit) ebay? local store?

I don't race motocross, but does that guide look like a good idea to follow?

http://www.motocross-racing-tips.com/motocross_gear.html

I'm plannning on buying: secondhand jersey and pants, Fox chest protector and Fox Kidney belts for $100 AUSD

Also, with the faded fairing, is it a good or bad idea to repaint the guards and fenders just to give it a better look? Maybe painting the frame black as well was what I was thinking. Would it be better to just buy new plastics?

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Honda-Owners-Manual-1993-CR250R-CR250-/290436342408?pt=Motorcycles_Parts_Accessories&hash=item439f5ae288#ht_500wt_969

Good idea buying a manual from the US? I live in Australia, better idea to go into my local store and ask for one?

https://www.slipstreamperformance.com.au/store/product_info.php?products_id=21432

I've been told Wiseco are the best for rebuild kits. When I need one does that sound like the kit I should buy?

Also remember I have a car to run, I am trying not to spend too much money on this bike. At the moment it sounds like it will be a bit of work :/

My suggestion is to go cheap and easy. Buy a service manual, ebay or your local bike shop will have one.

Why paint the bike or replace plastics if your budget is limited? Why not just get your bike in the best MECHANICAL condition you can and worry about the esthetics at a later time? If a fender is broken, I can understand replacing it. If not, just get the bike running well and all worn parts maintained so you can enjoy riding.

To clean an air filter you can either use soap and water (which is a bit time consuming) or use something that breaks down oil such as an engine degreaser.

Here in the states you can go to an Auto Parts store and buy and engine degreaser such as Gunk.

Down under MUST have an equivalent. Once the filter is clean and DRY, re oil oil the filter by using a MOTORCYCLE filter oil that is carried at any motorcycle shop.

The air filter is under the seat which is held in place with two screws.

As for your riding gear that guide sounds OK, buy used gear, get the fundamentals of your bike together (fresh fuel, clean air filter, clean gear box oil, properly adjusted and lubed chain, proper tire pressures etc) and go and RIDE.

Learn how to jet your bike, it will make al the difference in how the bike runs.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=412662

follow this posting to learn how to jet your bike.

Learn how to work on your equipment. You will make mistakes, we all did starting out.

Simple tools will be fine, flat ad phillips head screw drivers, metric sockets and flat wrenches and maybe even an adjustable wrench will see you through until your skills increase.

Wiseco pistons are just fine when you need a top end.

Where to buy parts? ebay or online or local dealer all work well.

Where to buy tools? You are better off spending a few dollars more and getting a high quality set of tools that fit properly and work well in your hands. I have tools that are 35 years old and still work as well as they did the day I bought them with my newspaper delivery money!

Here in the States we have Craftsmen tools made by Sears. Down under? Not sure who make or sells high quality tools. You could always ask your local auto or motorcycle mechanic as to how they buy their tools from and if they are high quality.

Quality tools last a lifetime, mine have!

Go ride and have fun.

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Had a look at that CR250R and it's a piece of shit. He gave me the pictures of it from when he'd bought it, 2 years later and the outcome is.

Faded and damaged plastics, he said he'd cable tied them up to the frame.

The grips where sticky and needed replacing, rear tyre was bald, chain was rusty, he'd done a few things to make it faster as well. He said he'd done something to the carby to get it to suck in more fuel. He cut something on the frame or somewhere to make it turn sharper, the bike looked like it had literally been picked up from a dump. If he'd actually cleaned the bike and made it look a little better I can tell you now I probably would've bought it. The owner was about 20 and was selling it for cash to do up his track car, he most likely would've thrashed the shit out of the bike. Now in saying this, I know with these bike they're meant for it, but does it sound like a good buy or not?

He started the bike in 3 kicks, the bike wouldn't idle cold. It sounded alright, I didn't get a chance to ride it though. He told me the engine and gears where all fine and I guess that's all I really needed, but my mum didn't want me to buy it thinking it would need everything replaced.

Another thing, the bike was leaking a lot of fuel. He put the bike on it's side at one stage to show me a few parts of the engine and that and fuel just poured out everywhere, didn't even come to his attention. Would this be a leak in the fuel tank or something? (He just text me about this and said the floats are set too high and need to be adjusted down, that's got to do with the jetting right? sound legit?) Brakes where fine, clutch was pretty worn and probably needed replacing. I offered him 700 for the bikes condition and he said no so I just left. What do you think? is the engine all that really matters in the end as far as money for the 2 strokes? The bike was running and that's all I really want, I bet if I took it for a ride I would've bought it too. Visual appearance doesn't really matter when I'll be riding it up the river 2-3 times a year and maybe sometimes take it up to a track. My mum wouldn't of let me get it anyway because of it's condition and the way it had been treated. He also mentioned the bike would not be fit for racing, with that being said does that mean it has lost a lot of it's power or what? would the 2000 kx85 be a better bike to go with? I've heard of 85's beating 125's and 250's, and then heard the difference between an 85 to a 250 is phenomenal.

The bike was fine in height, I was expecting it to be a lot bigger to be honest, but It was fine. Didn't get a chance to ride the bike so couldn't really tell how I would handle the weight.

A lot of info, but I don't really want to take a risk on this one and want some info from someone that knows about bikes. Keep looking? or offer 800-900?

Thanks,

Foley.

Cheers for all of the info dude, answered all of my questions. Really appreciate it.

Heres another bike, KX85 2000. For that price it's a steal, gotta need a rebuild or something because I saw a 2004 model up for $2,500. It won't have the power I'm looking for, but I'm just thinking it's a bit safer going with a newer bike? Also gives mum a chance to consider whether to get it or not. Also going by a bike valuation price on bikes, the CR250R 93' is $2000-2600 second hand. The KX85 00' is $2300-2700.

http://adelaide.gumtree.com.au/c-Cars-Vehicles-Motorbikes-Parts-motorbikes-motorcycles-scooters-motorbikes-motorcycles-accessories-Kawasaki-kx85-great-condition-1100-ONO-W0QQAdIdZ320861146

Edited by Foleyy

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I would keep looking if I were you. If you weigh over 125 pounds an 85 is going to be too small for you.

Hard to give you a break down on prices, here in the states people are dumping bikes for cash.

I know down under even used bikes cost more than they do in the states, at least they were when I was in Melbourne a few years ago.

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From what you described of that bike, i would stay far away from it!!!! Unless of course he just gave it to you........even then i'd have 2nd thoughts!

Your description of it just sounds like a money pit..

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Well put it this way, I saw an 89' CR250R going for $2,000 in really good condition, sell within a week.

Yeah I know, but I think I'll be getting this 85. It's going for $1,100 and and I could resell it for more. They go for around 2grand so theres gotta be something wrong with it.

I sat on a 125 and a 250, no difference really. I reckon I could handle a 250 anyway, it would just take some time.

Edited by Foleyy

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I'm just thinking the 85 won't be enough.

What would a KDX200 be like?

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How do you know if the bike has good compression? Have you put a compression gauge on the motor or just going "by feel". Until you put a gauge in the engine you will not really know if you have good compression.

If the clutch is wearing out I can virtually guarantee that the top end is probably pretty worn and is probably needing a rebuild.

From your description I would say that $1000 AU is probably overpriced looking from a USA point of view.

Like it or not a 1993 CR250 is going to need more work and parts than what you think when you first look at the bike.

I will bet that the rear shock bumper is dry rotted or completely missing the rear shock probably needs a rebuild. When you bounce on the rear suspension is it like a pogo stick or does it have any dampening.

The front forks probably have leaking seals and the forks need at least new fork fluid.

The brake pads may be worn or at their service life. Take a look at the brake fluid, probably straw yellow and since the bike has been sitting the master cylinders and brake calipers may need rebuilding.

Take a look at the chain sliders on the swing arm. They may be missing or worn out, same with the chain guide.

Silencer probably need repacking.

Look closely at the tires and rims. Are the rims dented? What do the spokes look and feel like? Any missing spokes?

The tires may be dry rotted or worn out. Plan on new tires since the bike has sat so long.

Does the rear suspension linkage have any play in it? Does it squeak when you compress or release the suspension?

I would do the following since the bike has sat:

-pull air cleaner, clean and re-oil with motorcycle air filter oil. After this many years I would probably just buy a new air filter. Air filters start to deteriorate and when they do dirt gets past them, destroying your motor. Air filters are CHEAP.

-drain all gas from tank, throughly rinse tank with water and allow to dry

completely before re-filling with new pre-mix

-pull carburetor, completely clean, while carb is off, pull reed block and inspect reeds to make sure they are not worn out or chipping

-change spark plug, make certain new plug is correct type and specification

-drain all coolant and replace with a high quality motorcycle type coolant. I do not use automotive type coolants, they do have additives that may not be compatible with motorcycle cooling systems.

-drain transmission and replace oil with motorcycle type trans oil. DO NOT use auto only oil in the gear box, it will make your clutch slip. As noted Honda makes a quality trans oil. use it.

-check tire pressures and adjust as necessary

-I would pull the brake calipers off and inspect the brake pads, I would also go ahead and change the front and rear brake fluid by bleeding the brakes. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, therefore it absorbs moisture from the atmosphere. If you ever see a motorcycle master cylinder with anything other than CLEAR brake fluid you can be sure that the brake fluid has gone bad. After sitting for years the brake fluid has absorbed at least some moisture, change it, it is cheap and easy.

-pull the front and rear wheels off, inspect and re-grease the wheel bearings. To be honest EVERY old bike that I buy and plan on riding I change the front and rear wheel bearings. A set of wheel bearings is CHEAP. Having a front or rear hub get destroyed from a bearing going bad is EXPENSIVE. It can also strand you on the trail. NOT FUN.

One of the BEST tools I ever purchased was a wheel bearing puller set. I thought I might only use it once or twice, I was wrong I find myself using the tool 5 or 6 times a year! What was once a chore is now a 1 minute operation.

I got my wheel bearing puller here:

http://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/pr...FamilyId=20342

-check your front and rear spokes. Who knows when the last time they were checked or tightened.

-oil your chain and inspect the swing arm slider(s) frame rollers and swingarm chain guide, also inspect the front and rear sprockets. If they are worn, replace.

-Pull off the rear suspension and grease all the suspension components; swingarm bearings, suspension linkage, shock mounting points, rear axle. It is a good idea to pull those items off anyway as water gets into those linkage points and can corrode the bearings. Last thing you want is the bearings to seize up which can make disassembly VERY difficult.

-Pull off the front triple clamps and inspect and re-grease the front triple clamp bearings. I can't tell you how many times I have pulled off triple clamps and found dry bearings.

The bike should be pretty much ready to ride after this. Yes, it SEEMS like a lot of work but if you do it one step at a time over a week period or so it goes by rather quickly.

Great advice!

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Nice to hear someone else is working on a 93' cr250! I just recently broke mine down completely. Can't say I know exactly what I'm doing but feel free to give me a pm.

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