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Hey everyone

I know that drz400's are made to be rode on the back wheel especially an sm :ride:

I have a sm and want to wheelie :worthy: ive seen vids on youtube and just wondered if i could get some advice off a wheelie vetran 👍

ive heard 1st is too jumpy and 2nd is ok ? but just wanna know what would be best to do ?

once i know whats best ill try and get a sick photo and upload it :worthy:

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:eek:Just start from the beginning in 1st cover the rear brake 👍 when your brain is happy with this move onto 2nd clutch it up and sit back a bit again till your happy ride 2 gear out. You dont rush this once 2nd is sorted time to shift wile its up into 3rd. Now you moving and your butts twitching :ride: again when happy and being able to keep it straight time for 4th :worthy:.

Its taken me a good year to get there and still far off doing good distance i can do 1/4 just in 4th but ive got to slow it down to cover the distance as im all out of revs and putting it down at 70mph plus :worthy:

Take care and practice practice practice :worthy:

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Be very careful. We were practicing fast wheelies yesterday, and my buddy 12:30'd his bike at about 70mph. If he hadn't been covering the brake, he'd probably be in the hospital right now.

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The problem with 1st gear wheelies is clutch ups come up very fast for a beginner and power ups are easier to loop since you have to be deep in the throttle.

Stock SM, 2nd gear at 25mph constant throttle, handfull of throttle, clutch dump and lean back with a tug on the bars. You wont have enough power to keep the front up unless you are close to the balance point so just practice the timing with the throttle, clutch and tug on the bars until you are comfortable. Dont mess with high speed wheelies. If you are constantly gaining speed then you arent at the balance point yet. Typically when you have to look around the front fender you are close:)

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I'm going to suggest a little different approach. I like the power wheelie and think it's much safer to start with than the unknown response of a handfull of throttle and dumping the clutch. IMO, there's a whole lot less of a chance of pitching it backwards as all you have to do is let off the gas a little and it comes right back down. You could work on it in 1st if you can't get the frt up in 2nd, but like someone said, you run out of gear pretty quick. After you start getting used to it coming up, you'll start to get the hang of body position and tugging at the bars. If it won't come up, scoot your butt back a little further.

And foot on the rear brake is always a good measure as you're starting out. But, I can say I can't really recall ever hitting it, but in th emiddle of an "oh sheeeeet!!!" who know's what happens!

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imho...from my experiences on my DRZ-s with 14/47 gearing...and with the goal of being able to do useful wheelies for placing the front wheel for clearing obstacles, etc. off road rather than trying to ride one for 11 miles (though that is a great skill also)...

1st is good for just getting the front end up...not very good for keeping it up long. but, it's a good way to start to get the feel for the front coming up at the slowest possible speeds (meaning least damage if you crash). and, there are *lots* of times on the trails where you want to pop the front end up in 1st.

you can just power the front up in 1st by sitting back a little and maybe a bit of body english, but after a very short learning curve, using the clutch is easier and smoother (and allows you to place the front wheel on obstacles without gaining as much acceleration). putt along at walking speed, then pull the clutch with one finger, up the RPMs a bit, then pop the clutch. start off with only raising the RPMs just a little bit...trying to just get the front to come up a little. then gradually increase it so the front comes up higher and higher.

at first, just get the front up then immediately chop the throttle to put it back down. covering the rear brake is great, but, in my experience, on the DRZ, you can just chop the throttle to do the same thing (and it's a bit easier to master).

then start trying to carry the front a little while, but you won't get far in 1st before you run out of gear if you are not hitting the balance point and maintaining a slow wheelie at a level RPM (i wouldn't worry about that just yet...try to keep it before the balance point at first so as not to loop it at first--you'll know when it is time to proceed).

then try them in 2nd. there is enough room in 2nd to carry the front for awhile even before the balance point before running out of gear. with my gearing, the sweet spot is about 18 to 20 mph in 2nd. cruise along in 2nd at that speed and then pull the clutch with one finger, rev it, and dump the clutch. again, start out only revving it a bit. you might not even get the front up at first...just keep increasing the RPMs a bit if you don't. eventually, it will come up. just chop the throttle to put it right back down the first few times. then you can start to carry it as you get a feel for it. again, covering the back brake is good, but you can also just chop the throttle.

depending on your goal, focus on trying to get good at lifting the front wheel to different specific heights. this is good for placing it near the top of obstacles on trails (so you can hit the top third of the obstacle with the bottom third of your front tire)...or start to focus on getting to the balance point and holding it there if your goal is to ride wheelies.

in my experience, on the DRZ, clutching them up is the way to go. i've had some other bikes where just cracking the throttle worked better, but not on the DRZ. the really nice thing about clutching them up is that you can actually lean *forward* rather than *backward* as the bike comes up--or, not really lean forward, but let your body stay more vertical--with the bars coming into you--rather than leaning back with the bike). this helps to keep the balance much better (as you don't have the hanging off the bars effect...your body weight is still on the seat/pegs and centered over the bike)--at least for me.

i have also found that it is easiest with one finger on the clutch...and once you get to know the sweet spots on your bike for each gear. (on mine, in first it is anything from barely moving to maybe 10mph. in 2nd, it is about 18 to 20 mph, in 3rd, it is somewhere around 25 to 30mph. it doesn't really come up in 4th.)

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Thanks littleredtoyota awesome words of wisdom there 👍:ride:

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Practice, practice and more practice. Clutching a 2nd gear wheelie is much safer than powering a 1st gear wheelie.

It's not about power. My DRZ wheelies much easier and controlled than either of my R1's do.

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Practice, practice and more practice. Clutching a 2nd gear wheelie is much safer than powering a 1st gear wheelie.

It's not about power. My DRZ wheelies much easier and controlled than either of my R1's do.

WERD gearing FTW!

The higher the gear you wheelie in, the more revs you have to play with and the less twitchy the bike feels.

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Will have pics soon of what happens when you go back too far. Same guy who 12:30'd the other day, ate shit big time in 5th gear.

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Is it too hot up there to wear a motorcycle jacket? Or did his jacket get pulled up that high? I guess my love handles are there to keep my jacket from riding up?

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Is it too hot up there to wear a motorcycle jacket? Or did his jacket get pulled up that high? I guess my love handles are there to keep my jacket from riding up?

On the dirt, wearing a pressure suit and jersey.

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Uhhh, yeahhh, I'm going with OUCH!!!!

That's some serious rash!

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I didnt read all the replies but this is my advice coming from someone who stunts a cbr600.... start from just about a dead stop and clutch up a first gear wheelie and when your up to balance point you wont gain speed and your bike will never run out of gear. you keep it in balance point by making little adjustments to the throttle and brake. to slow a wheelie down let it fall behind balance point and ride the brake while keeping it past balance point. It takes alot of practice to get good at this so take your time and learn it slow.

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also never power up a wheelie always clutch up a wheelie. some people say this is hard on the clutch but is not at all i have over 12thousand miles of just stunting on my bike on the stock clutch with no issues. Pull the clutch in and rev it up and slip out the clutch quickly but dont just dump it out.... keep doing this untill you realize what rpm to let the clutch out to bring the bike up to balance point and keep practicing.

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left foot on the passenger peg, right foot covering back brake, 20-25mph in 2nd and crack the throttle WFO. itll throw you right into bp, goose the throttle and ride it out :busted:

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