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Lost confidence on Jumps...

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Hi

Never been that good a jumps but a few weeks ago I landed heavy on the front wheel and then my head. Have lost all confidence since then.

My problem is I don't know if it is my suspension set up or my body position or both... My gut feeling is its my body position. I am 6' 3" and pretty much all legs and arms and I am either front wheel to low or too high, I do get it right sometimes but way to inconsistent.

I need to improve my jumping technique (table tops, ski jumps, doubles, etc) as I am running good speed but losing time on the jumps.

Any pointers, links, etc would be really appreciated.

Thanks

Chris

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Hi

Never been that good a jumps but a few weeks ago I landed heavy on the front wheel and then my head. Have lost all confidence since then.

My problem is I don't know if it is my suspension set up or my body position or both... My gut feeling is its my body position. I am 6' 3" and pretty much all legs and arms and I am either front wheel to low or too high, I do get it right sometimes but way to inconsistent.

I need to improve my jumping technique (table tops, ski jumps, doubles, etc) as I am running good speed but losing time on the jumps.

Any pointers, links, etc would be really appreciated.

Thanks

Chris

The most important part of the jump is where the bike actually leaves the ground, where you have the compression and rebound part of the jump. What gives you control at this critical part of the jump is your body movements and throttle control. Along with this body movement and throttle control is timing. The timing is so critical that the body movement and throttle control has to be an automatic reflex reaction. This is why it takes so much time and practice to learn to jump well. Key into the compressing and rebound part of the jump, move your body back a little as the rear wheel kicks up and blip the throttle a little at the same time. This will cause the front wheel to stay level or come up a little. If the front wheel is too high don’t move back as much or give it as much throttle. If you want the front end lower it’s just the opposite; don’t blip the throttle as much and don’t move back as much. When you want to accelerate after the landing it’s best to land with the throttle on. I have 2 Technique DVDs that cover Jumping and Whoops and more available to download. You can see a free DVD preview of these and many others at: www.gsmxs.com or you can visit www.mxraceschool.com for complete DVD downloads.

DVD-home-page-pic-take-4-fi.png

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You should try get your suspension tweaked. Im the same height as you and I actually overjumped a jump by 16 feet, like I jumped over the hole landing...

So I lost my confidence alot, but then I got my bike dailed in, and it made me much more confidence. I also tryed to ride with my legs more straight (not completly straight) and lean more with my upperbody because of my height.

Now I jump all the jumps on my track with ease 👍

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I had two back to back crashes off jumps, really gnarly stuff, landed on my head, broke my leatt brace, knocked out, ya know bad stuff. It took me a few laps days after each crash to just get it out of my head and kinda figure out what happened and how to let it not happen in the future.

One thing about jumps that disturbs me is the commitment level needed. You have to be committed and when I mean committed, I mean if someone cuts in front of your path, you'll run them over (not literally, but you understand what i mean). If you are tentative approaching a jump, you will most likely not be in the right body position and in the right frame of mind to take the jump.

I also feel that big bore bikes 450's/500's/525's etc and beginners, make for a bad combo. I'm making an assumption that the OP is riding a big bore bike due to his weight and size. They're so easy to ride that a lot of times, people ride over their skill level because its easy. That goes right back to the subject of commitment and understanding what that entails.

I agree with Gary about the physical act of jumping, but there is so much more to it then the physical act of jumping. Just because you know how to jump, doesn't mean you will be able to repeat that when the time comes. I ride a lot and honestly, I still get tense when I jump, even though I enjoy it. There is something about flying that is difficult to get my head around and ya know what, my answer to your question is simply; practice, practice, practice and honestly, if you don't feel comfortable doing something, don't do it. Its much better to take your time then it is to crash and get hurt. I know, I've done it and I have the permanent effects of body damage to prove it.

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You should try get your suspension tweaked. Im the same height as you and I actually overjumped a jump by 16 feet, like I jumped over the hole landing...

So I lost my confidence alot, but then I got my bike dailed in, and it made me much more confidence. I also tryed to ride with my legs more straight (not completly straight) and lean more with my upperbody because of my height.

Now I jump all the jumps on my track with ease 👍

i over-jumped a 90ft tabletop and landed flat, compressed a vertebrae in my back and i didn't really ride for about 4 months, went back to that track on the weekend and hit that jump 2nd lap around, so it wouldn't scare me. i had lost my confidence in doing the big jumps, but hen i just went out and did it and gained my confidence again:thumbsup: i got my riding technique sorted so i would take more of the impact in the needs instead of the back, and landing with the throttle on to drive away from the jump, over jumped it again but not as much, landed with the throttle on and i was fine:ride:

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Thanks for stories, guys. I am riding a CRF 250 so not the big bore stuff. I definitely don't give 100% commitment every lap and as I get tired through the moto, even less commitment... But I guess I need to practice over the off season to get some confidence back and I will get the suspension dialed in.

Thanks again.

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I had the same problem then I started to tweak suspension. As more experienced guys said it's very complex but if you put more rebound on the shock, the bike won't kick that much and it gives you more confidence to hit the jump without rolling off the throttle.

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work your way up small to bigger all the while compensating with suspension changes. I have had bad experiences with landing hard or rebounding funny that messes with confidence. if your bike is dialed things wont seem so hairy.

oops pretty much what he said ^^^^^^

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I lost all my confidence on jumps as well. A year ago I Hit a kicker in the lip. Went over the bars which resulted in two broken femurs. A broken pelvis in three spots and a broken c4 vertebrae. Not good........

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Thanks for stories, guys. I am riding a CRF 250 so not the big bore stuff. I definitely don't give 100% commitment every lap and as I get tired through the moto, even less commitment... But I guess I need to practice over the off season to get some confidence back and I will get the suspension dialed in.

Good, well at least your probably on the right bike.

I've been riding a lot of 250f's recently and one of the things I've had to change in my riding style is all about dealing with commitment off the lip of the jump. On the lil 2 stroke, you can pin it up a face and let go of the throttle when you've reached the proper velocity because the rear wheel won't stop when you let go of the throttle. If you do that same thing on a 4 stroke, the rear wheel will stop and it will put you into a nose-dive situation if your not careful. Being successful at riding a 4 stroke means, you really need to be smooth on the power and leave the jump face on the throttle. It takes some time to get use to, but once you do, I have a feeling you will be more confident in your jumping.

You should practice your max moto length on a regular basis. So if you normally run 6 - 8 lap moto's, you should be on the track practicing that and getting your body familiar with that length of riding. I do a lot of training related to just that, staying on the track as long as possible, riding to the point where I can no longer hold the bike anymore.

As I always say, in motocross there is only one thing separating you from the ground and its not the tires, its the suspension. So getting your suspension dialed in is a very good idea, I think you should really spend some time with someone off-season getting it more plush and setting it up to not beat your body up as much, that way you can run longer moto's and feel more comfortable on the machine. I recently gave up trying to get some plushness out of my suspension myself and dropped my stuff off to Factory Connection, can't wait to get it back!

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you sound like me, real lanky. You have the advantage of really being able to move around on the bike, soak up jumps with your legs, and suck up/extend the bike out to hit specific spots on landings. Also when you get tired, it makes getting out of position real sketchy and you can get way out of wack.

Before you get all crazy with bike set up, try to get some picture or videos of your body position. My guess is your probably too upright. When your riding do you feel the handle bars pulling you?

jump confidence is something that comes with practice, and if you practice when your too tired, you don't focus on proper/safe technique and can endanger your self. A few short motos with good body position and control over jumps will make you more comfortable then an entire day full of boner airs and endos.

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Thanks again. The points about throttle on when you take of and land is interesting and makes sense. This is something I can defo think about when I am next on the bike.

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body positioning is key as well. Being taller myself it took me a while to figure out where to be on the bike to get the bike level. Coming from a bmx bike where if you lean back off the lip you will stay front wheel high, I quickly found the opposite to be true on a mx bike. The farther back I was the more the front dropped on me, due to the shock acting like a spring off the lip. I found that smooth constant throttle with my body positioned head over the bars body over the middle, or very slightly forwards, I could keep the bike level on almost any jump and was a good safe position to start hitting jumps.

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Thanks for making this thread. Reading all the replies has gave me lot's of insight in the way I tackle jumps.

At times I feel apprehensive coming up to 2 jumps in particular at the track I frequent. I come up to it with the intention of clearing it, but something in my head says "I don't thinkso" and I loose my confidence and don't attempt to try and clear it the rest of the day. The other jump I'm scared of is a huge step up. I tried clearing it on my YZ250F (now have a YZ450F) and came up short and hit the face of the hill and fell off the back.

When I head out this Saturday. My main goal is to make these jumps and get rid of the demons holding me back.

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Just go easy. The learning curve is a long one and it takes time. My thing was that I had to be more forward than I thought. When you are back there is no control and you boner air it every time. When you are over the head set you can really control it and make adjustments. When you take the subframe off the bike you realize that to be centered on the bike is to be way forward...its just the way they are made now.

Add n 4 stroke engine compression and its even more important. I have watched too many people (dear friends) almost widow their wives/girlfriends by decellerating or not keeping on the gas and augering into the ground. Its not right. You have to really prepare yourself mentally. Keep us posted.

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