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Which oil for XR400

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Hi All

I have always used semi synthetic 10 w 40 in my XR600 with no problems, I read in a mag that you shouldn't use it in a XR400 (only non synthetic oils) because the clutch is smaller and will make it slip, anybody had this happen or any thoughts?

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Use a motorcycle oil of your preference and keep it clean. Automotive oils - do not contain the requiste additives and synthetic automotive oil will make your clutch slip. Change it often - that is the key, along with a clean air filter.

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Thanks for the info.

Air filter every ride , oil changed ever 400 miles and oil and filter every 800 miles, I have always used Morris Multivis 10w40 semi sythetic ( it is UK based ), never had clutch slip with it, but just wondering if it would on the XR400 as the article says it has a small clutch.

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I think you just opened a can of worms.

Automotive oils - do not contain the requiste additives and synthetic automotive oil will make your clutch slip.

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I think the last post answered the question.

The newer car oils designed for "high efficiency" have additives that can cause clutch slippage. Also the newer car oils have lost some of the additives that help protect sliding surfaces like cam followers (newer cars have roller cams).

For air cooled engines or extreme use there is an important spec that is not on the oil bottles, it is High Temperature High Shear (HTHS) measured at 150 degrees C. The requirement really jumps for 15W-40 and heavier oils, that is why oils such as 15W-40 Rotello T and the 20W-50 oils are used in air cooled motorcycles. These high values are also available in some 40 weight synthetics such as Mobil 1 0W-40, look for the ACEA A3 spec because not all Mobile 1 oils with less than 15W rating meet the spec. A good syn can provide the same high temp protection while being thinner than a dyno oil at low temps, good for startup, and nice clutch action.

You are always safe using a JASO-MA spec oil with a wet clutch, Shell claims Rotello T meets the spec and from other's experience we know there are quite a few non motorcycle oils (Mobil 1 is one example) that also work well with wet clutches.

But be aware that there are quite a few different Mobil 1 formulas and not all may be wet clutch friendly.

You can also do a web search for the spec sheet on a candidate oil; any HTHS value equal to or greater than 3.5 is good for engine protection at high temps.

http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/MotorOil/Oils/Motorcycle_Oil_FAQs.aspx#FAQs1

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I think the last post answered the question.

The newer car oils designed for "high efficiency" have additives that can cause clutch slippage. Also the newer car oils have lost some of the additives that help protect sliding surfaces like cam followers (newer cars have roller cams).

For air cooled engines or extreme use there is an important spec that is not on the oil bottles, it is High Temperature High Shear (HTHS) measured at 150 degrees C. The requirement really jumps for 15W-40 and heavier oils, that is why oils such as 15W-40 Rotello T and the 20W-50 oils are used in air cooled motorcycles. These high values are also available in some 40 weight synthetics such as Mobil 1 0W-40, look for the ACEA A3 spec because not all Mobile 1 oils with less than 15W rating meet the spec. A good syn can provide the same high temp protection while being thinner than a dyno oil at low temps, good for startup, and nice clutch action.

You are always safe using a JASO-MA spec oil with a wet clutch, Shell claims Rotello T meets the spec and from other's experience we know there are quite a few non motorcycle oils (Mobil 1 is one example) that also work well with wet clutches.

But be aware that there are quite a few different Mobil 1 formulas and not all may be wet clutch friendly.

You can also do a web search for the spec sheet on a candidate oil; any HTHS value equal to or greater than 3.5 is good for engine protection at high temps.

http://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/MotorOil/Oils/Motorcycle_Oil_FAQs.aspx#FAQs1

Great post, thanks. No BS needed.

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I always just use the Honda GN4 (?) stuff reccomended in the manual. Cost a little bit but it's not outragous. With the XR, I only do about 2 -3 oil changes a year so no biggie. I use Rotella T in my pumpkin cuz it needs the oil changed more often and it's only 20/gallon at wally world.

Like Chuck said "You are always safe using a JASO-MA spec oil with a wet clutch". <<< Thats the main thing to look for.

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Bah. Don't need motorcycle oils. Don't need car oils. Not a big fan of synthetics either.

I use dino Diesel oil - Rotella T 15W-40. Diesel oils are the best thing going for high-performance motorcycle engines.

JayC

Edited by jayc250x

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Bah. Don't need motorcycle oils. Don't need car oils. Not a big fan of synthetics either.

I use dino Diesel oil - Rotella T 15W-40. Diesel oils are the best thing going for high-performance motorcycle engines.

JayC

Well maybe the next best!👍

I use to run GN4 oil but found Shell Rotello T 15W-40 provided better clutch action and a longer time before shifting became notchy (indicating shear breakdown of the oil). The T oil is a fleet service oil and uses a high quality base stock with a strong additive package designed for long engine life in diesel engines. I ran the equivalent Delo 400 in my cars since the early 90s with very good results. The SAE specs for High Temperature High Shear (HTHS) for 15W-40 oils is very much higher than lower classes of oils and that provides extra protection for our hot running air cooled engines. The 15W-40 and thicker oils have a High Temperature High Shear (HTHS) spec that is very much higher than lesser oils like 10W-40 or 10W-30; the HTHS is measured at 150 degrees C and IMO very important in an air cooled engine that is run hard. The only oil that is better at high temp is the 20W-50 oils used in air cooled twins.

The problem with these dyno oils is they are very thick at lower temps. The ACEA A3 spec requires a HTHS >3.5 (same as 15W-40 oils) and a few syn oils meet this spec, Mobil 1 0W-30 is one.

So the possible oils that I know of that have good HTHS specs besides the 15W-40 or 20W-50 dyno oils but have better flow at ambient temperatures are Rotello T6, Mobile 1 0W-40, and Mobile 1 racing 4T oils.

I tried Mobile 1 0W-40 in my XR and it provided much better clutch action than the Torco 20W-50 dyno oil or the Rotello T.

The specs are available online for these oils so do your research. Viscosity above 13 at 100 degrees C, viscosity below 100 at 40 degrees C, and HTHS (@150C) of more than 3.5 is IMO a good oil.

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