Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Shock spring recommendation - 07 250xcw

Recommended Posts

I have a pair of Racetech .44 fork springs from my old DRZ that are the same part# for my 07 250xcw. I'm 6'2" 235lb fully geared up with water and hope to use these springs (??).

After much reading relative to shock spring rate, one thing is for sure that some prefer straight rate and some prefer progressive rate. All seem to agree howver that front/rear balance is crucial. Assuming the .44's are adequate, what rate straight shock spring would provide the optimum balance for me? 9.0?

Off-road only...no moto. Intermediate skill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recruit, i ran 9.0 and 44's in my 05 200 for some time. The 200 is sligjtly lighter and i weigh slightly more geared up, 240. I ended up with a 9.2 out back to run a little less preload. It supported me a bit better in the g outs and big hits.

I believe you are on the right track.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Recruit, i ran 9.0 and 44's in my 05 200 for some time. The 200 is sligjtly lighter and i weigh slightly more geared up, 240. I ended up with a 9.2 out back to run a little less preload. It supported me a bit better in the g outs and big hits.

I believe you are on the right track.

Thanks gmoss. Is it a general rule to run as little preload as possible to maximize use of the entire spring length?

Also, Slaven's website indicates their 260mm length springs are a direct replacement for ALL linkless models that come stock with a 250mm spring. The extra 10mm enables additional adjustability. Is this significant or just stick with the stock 250mm length?

Anyone out there have a 9.0 or 9.2 spring they'd like to sell?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Length of the spring is nothing to worry about. I like to have 3-5mm preload on the spring. With 9, i had 7-8mm preload. Personal preference relly. The 9 just felt a little soft, mushy, especially on big hits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fork numbers sound right to me. I'm slightly heavier than you and I"m using .46s up front on a 2007 200 XC-w.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm about the same weight geared up and I have 44's in the front. They seems just about right although I had to revalve to get the action right. I have 8.6 in the rear and have always wanted to try a 9 but haven't found a reasonably priced used one yet. I can get the sag right with the 8.6 but I want to try running less (zero) preload. The PDS shock is very sensitive to spring changes. The damping goes up exponentially as it compresses so if you have too much sag your already in the stiffer portion of the damping right off the start. Stiffening up the spring keeps the shock working in the correct portion of its travel and feels smoother initially and obviously keeps the sterring geometry right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was 21 plus gear and ran 46 and 92 on my 200, then a revalve and 8.8 with the 46, Gmoss and i exchanged views waaay back and he thot the lighter spring was best back then but hemorphed into what i used, then I went to softer like he used originally.

So.... I would say around 9.0 for the rear is a good start point. 46 or 44 is trial and error.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've put a WTB ad up here on TT and at KTMTalk for a 9.0. I'd lean towards a plusher ride so the 9.0 may be better than a 9.2 in my case. It's not uncommon for us to ride 16 hours or more in 2 days.

Sounds like the 44's will be a good match too relative to front/rear balance. That's good news as they've been collecting dust for a while now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well an 8.8 is in the mail. I couldn't find a 9.0 so hopefully the 8.8 will be a good match for the 44's.

If it's a little light and therefore needs too much preload, of course the other way around it is to "subtract" a few pounds from the payload! 👍

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 8.8 is on with race sag at 119mm, 32mm static and 8mm of spring preload (235 lbs fully geared/watered up). Far better than the 7.6 that came with the bike. I still have to put the 44's in the forks.

Am I splitting hairs to tighten the preload a little more thereby reducing race, albeit static sag too? In other words is race sag the most important setting with static and preload of lower importance?

I was shooting for 115mm race, 35mm static with 5mm preload. Looks like a 9.0 would be better but the 8.8 seems pretty close.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The 8.8 is on with race sag at 119mm, 32mm static and 8mm of spring preload (235 lbs fully geared/watered up). Far better than the 7.6 that came with the bike. I still have to put the 44's in the forks.

Am I splitting hairs to tighten the preload a little more thereby reducing race, albeit static sag too? In other words is race sag the most important setting with static and preload of lower importance?

I was shooting for 115mm race, 35mm static with 5mm preload. Looks like a 9.0 would be better but the 8.8 seems pretty close.

You are close, but have a lot of preload on the spring. It will likely feel a little mushy on the big acceleration bumps. 9.0 or even 9.2 with less preload. The added preload will drive the front end more with the extra stored energy.

I just sent my susp off for some work and it turns out the 8.0 I thought I bought was an 8.8. :busted: No wonder it feels stiff. hahaha However, he said the valving was soft soft that I need the spring to keep the shock up in the stroke. Seems the previous tuner just softened it up a lot for running in the rocks, too soft to where it offers little support.

Keep an eye out for a deal on one of the other springs and experiment. 9.0 may be good for ya. FTI shoots for 115mm rider with around 37 or so static, and I like 5mm preload or a little less.

Look forward to hearing how it performs for you in comparison.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You are close, but have a lot of preload on the spring. It will likely feel a little mushy on the big acceleration bumps. 9.0 or even 9.2 with less preload. The added preload will drive the front end more with the extra stored energy.

I just sent my susp off for some work and it turns out the 8.0 I thought I bought was an 8.8. :busted: No wonder it feels stiff. hahaha However, he said the valving was soft soft that I need the spring to keep the shock up in the stroke. Seems the previous tuner just softened it up a lot for running in the rocks, too soft to where it offers little support.

Keep an eye out for a deal on one of the other springs and experiment. 9.0 may be good for ya. FTI shoots for 115mm rider with around 37 or so static, and I like 5mm preload or a little less.

Look forward to hearing how it performs for you in comparison.

Thanks gmoss. Was the 8.0 supposed to be for your 144/200SX? Since we are about the same weight, guess the lighter spring is due to having a super light bike?

I'm putting the 44's in right now and my memory bank from DRZ/Showa days seems to recall the narrow end of the springs goes down. Is this correct in KTM/WP land too? If so, the black spring guide is too wide. Slavens talks about grinding the splines on the guide to fit fatter springs in one of his videos. Can I just install the narrow end of the spring up and skip the grinding?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My bike is the newer chassis, which takes a lighter spring. I ran a 9.2 on the chassis like yours.

All the springs i have installed have not had a narrow end. There is a process to installing the springs in the oc forks, you have to get the process right to get it together right. Never had to grind anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Got the 44's in today. Realized they were the stock springs from my old DRZ/Showa forks and not Racetech brand. Anyway, these springs (Showa brand I guess) are definitively narrower at one end and required some grinding of the spring guides. I watched Slaven's video again and he mentioned grinding would not have been necessary if they were WP springs.

Grinding was pretty painless and am hoping to do some test riding late this week if the weather holds out.

If a 9.0 or 9.2 rear spring pops up for cheap over the winter, I may still hop on it to get the rear sag/preload closer to ideal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The weather was great today (55 and sunny) so headed to the Mounds near Flint for some test riding.

The heavier springs definitively made a difference, especially the shock spring.

Started with the shock compression and rebound clicker at their existing settings (both 28 clicks out). The bike rode higher, didn't wallow near as much and just felt more confident with the heavier springs.

Then opened both the shock compression and rebound clicker all the way (34 and 45 clicks respectively). Lots of mush! In fact, it felt somewhat similar to the way it rode with the old springs. A buddy was with me and stood and watched. He noticed the same. The rear tire was up and down allot and the rear of the bike lower through a whooped area. I could lift the front end easier but it just wasn't an overly confidence inspiring ride.

Next closed both the shock compression and rebound clickers all the way. MUCH better than both clickers fully open. The bike just felt more confident. While going through whoops, I noticed the seat closer to my butt when hitting the tops of them which was a good thing. Lifting the front end was tougher.

Then set both clickers 15 clicks open. The bike still felt planted just not as harsh.

Onto the forks, the compression clickers were then set to fully closed. I thought the bike would wash pretty easy but wasn't bad at all. Backed off 10 compression clicks and felt perhaps a little better but honestly was pretty well spent too. We ended up shooting the breeze with a couple guys with a Jeep crawling rig before sundown and called it a day. It was pretty cool watching this rig trying to get up an incline and through a boulder garden but I digress.

While there's some fine tuning and will still keep an eye out for a deal on a 9.0 or 9.2, I can say the bike rides better for my heavy butt! :busted:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a rule of thumb; when you install stiffer springs you should increase the rebound damping to compensate for the change.

CoKTM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As a rule of thumb; when you install stiffer springs you should increase the rebound damping to compensate for the change.

CoKTM

Thanks coktm. That makes sense. It will probably be Spring before having a chance to ride again and make adjustments. :busted:

From the little testing so far, it appears more rebound and possibly compression (?) will suit me. In a way, it was good to see how uncontrolled the bike felt at the softest settings prior to going to much firmer settings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I played with the clickers today while riding with my son. Just had the forks done and the shock dyno'd. Needless to say the shock needs valved as well, but can't afford it right now.

For me, going soft on the compression yields a harsher ride with no support on hits. Softer on the Rebound helps some on the midvalve feel, but then gets chattery if I go too far from where my tuner set them.

I ended up back close to his settings after playing with them. Counter intuitive but many think going softer helps when you actually end up with harsher because it rides too low in the stroke. Other thing I find is that adjusting sag or preload on the shock greatly affects how the forks feel, just one turn today made a big difference in how the forks felt. I noticed the same thing with my last bike.

I probably should have had the shock done first since it drives the front, but oh well..

Hard to tune when my shock is so far off with valving and spring rate. argh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I played with the clickers today while riding with my son. Just had the forks done and the shock dyno'd. Needless to say the shock needs valved as well, but can't afford it right now.

For me, going soft on the compression yields a harsher ride with no support on hits. Softer on the Rebound helps some on the midvalve feel, but then gets chattery if I go too far from where my tuner set them.

I ended up back close to his settings after playing with them. Counter intuitive but many think going softer helps when you actually end up with harsher because it rides too low in the stroke. Other thing I find is that adjusting sag or preload on the shock greatly affects how the forks feel, just one turn today made a big difference in how the forks felt. I noticed the same thing with my last bike.

I probably should have had the shock done first since it drives the front, but oh well..

Hard to tune when my shock is so far off with valving and spring rate. argh.

Purely a hypothetical question but is the shock responsible for perhaps 75% of overall handling and the forks 25%? I can say the relatively large change in shock spring rate with only a small change in fork spring rate was quite noticeable :busted:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...