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So What's your excuse?

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So a tire cost 80.00 (we know some are cheaper..... some are ALOT more expensive) and KnobbyKnife cost 65.00.

Talk to me... What is your excuse?

KnobbyKnife is too expensive?

Sharpen tires? How do you do that?

Your are skeptical......It seems to good to be true?

You own your own tire changing machine?

Never heard of KnobbyKnife? That's easy KnobbyKnife.com

Money is not an issue?

Other?

thanks for your time... I'm curious to see what the answers will be.

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I can run a s12 for about 10 hours and have it still a very good edge on it. If i buy them from rocky mountain i can sell them used for about 10 dollars less than a new one. Then i just buy a new one. Ft tires last all season and still look new at the end of the year.

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By the time I change my tire (rear) the knobs are worn down to about 25% of their original height. Making them sharper would just be a waste of time for me as they are much too short.

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Usually when my tires are toast, its because there is no knob height left and the outside edge has knobs physically cracking off. Sure, using a blade to clean up the rounded front edge of a knob will give you back some traction. But it also reduces the over-all knob size, which means the knob will bend more, meaning it will wear out even quicker on a soft or intermediate tire. I haven't experimented with hard tires yet... They seem to not ever wear out! 👍

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I'm with woods-rider. My fave tire is the Dunlop 952 rear and it works great until it's almost bald (25% or so). Sharp knobbies aren't that big a deal on wet rocks, knob height is. I can see sharpening a front, but after a year or so the knobs are still in decent shape but the carcass starts breaking down and turning different. A hot knife and the time to wield it just doesn't pencil out for me as a trail rider. I can see how a motocrosser might get some use out of one though.

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It doesn't seem that any benefit would be worth the time and money. More so the money as I have lots of time. Acceleration is not a big problem for me in the woods.

I don't race and I do change my own tires... once every year or two.

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I don't think anyone doubts that it works, but most people don't need it. I wear down my tire pretty far and then switch it around. By the time both sides are rounded, there is barley any tread left anyways. Nothing to sharpen..

Edited by KJ55

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I've tried the knobby knife.

I ride in the desert foothills and washes. There is a lot of sharp granite that is hard on the tires. My typical Sat and Sun loop is about 25 - 30 mi. After 10 rides (250 - 300 mi), the front of the knobs on the rear tire are pretty rounded with about a 1/4 radius and has poor traction on loose dirt. That's only after 6 weeks of riding, even when I used a MAXXIS Desert IT, an MX71, or a D952!:ride:

I've taken off the rear tires and flipped them around and get an immediate, noticable improvement in straight line traction. Then, about 10 more rides and the tire is toast after 3 months of use.:worthy:

I can usually get an extra ride or two out of the tire by spending time to sharpen the front of the knobs, but the radius is so large, a lot has to be taken off. However, the traction improvement is much better than any perceived loss in handling due to changing the shape of the knob. I agree with KJ55, by the time I've rounded both sides, the lug isn't very tall anymore. That makes it difficult to ride the loose sandy sections and climb hills with loose sand and rocks.

I've found a better benefit for using it. Often, some of the adjacent lugs only have about a 1/4" deep groove between them, when new. This disappears quickly and affects the rear end sliding in turns on loose dirt. I sometimes re-cut these with the blade parallel to the plane of the tire.👍

Bottom line, I always keep new tires in the garage, learned to change them myself, and accepted it as the price of riding tough gnarly terrain.:worthy::ride:

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As others have said, by the time I would think about sharpening my tire's knobs, they're already very short. Cutting off more of the knob at that point is counter productive, and generally I just replace the tire anyway...

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I usually just buy the hardest hard terrain pack non-directional tires at $60 a piece and just flip the rear when needed. The fronts last so long, they actually develop side wall cracks before the tread knobs wear all the way down. The only problem I have with the hard pack terrain tires is slick mud on top of a hard packed trail. It is like trying to ice skate with each ice skate on the incorrect foot - the bike goes absolutely in every direction but the way I'm pointing - Kind of like trying to ride on wet leaves on top of an unknown surface - fun 👍.

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Hmm, cutting edges of knobs reduces contact on hard surfaces in case the OP thinks the tire is good as new for the same conditions. Not so

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So a tire cost 80.00 (we know some are cheaper..... some are ALOT more expensive) and KnobbyKnife cost 65.00.

Talk to me... What is your excuse?

KnobbyKnife is too expensive?

Sharpen tires? How do you do that?

Your are skeptical......It seems to good to be true?

You own your own tire changing machine?

Never heard of KnobbyKnife? That's easy KnobbyKnife.com

Money is not an issue?

Other?

thanks for your time... I'm curious to see what the answers will be.

Buy tires that are made from Jesus skin and dont wear? http://www.motoz.com.au/

Done. Easy. Have them on the 450 and havent had to replace them for about 7 months now, work like new:worthy:

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I've wanted to get one but the price is a litle steep. I'm a tire flipper and love a sharp knobby but I haven't ben able to bring myslf to buy one as I'm too cheap 👍

Now if it included a tire groover for the same price or a litle less I might bite.

But I've just recently switched over to the MotoZ tires as well and so far it doesn't seem a sharpening will be necesary with this design....

But grooving is something I could always play with.

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I've wanted to get one but the price is a litle steep. I'm a tire flipper and love a sharp knobby but I haven't ben able to bring myslf to buy one as I'm too cheap :ride:

Now if it included a tire groover for the same price or a litle less I might bite.

But I've just recently switched over to the MotoZ tires as well and so far it doesn't seem a sharpening will be necesary with this design....

But grooving is something I could always play with.

Has to be the gnarliest looking tire to date, roosts hurt from them I have heard 👍

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I'm glad you guys are having good luck with your Motoz as my experience was the opposite. The rear started chunking almost immediately and after 5 rides it was just about like riding a bald tire. The front never hooked up and would put me in the dirt with no warning and started losing the side knobs after the 6th or 7th ride. I'm not real inclined to try them again.

To the OP, I don't have an "excuse". Having an excuse implies I have been doing something wrong when I haven't! 👍 Now, I think the knobby knife is a great idea for those that want to get every little bit out of their tires but it just isn't cost or time effective for myself. I normally get a year out of a set of tires and that is enough for me.

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