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Hello, can anybody tell me how to position your body to go fast on a straight. I'm only asking because when i tried going fast on a straight i was standing up, got headshake, lost control of my front wheel and crashed. So now i'm assuming it's wrong to be standing up but how do you do it. Are you meant to sit towards the front of the bike or the rear or what? I have no idea but i want to know because i don't feel like i can go very fast on the track anymore from fear of crashing again. 👍 Thanks for any advice.

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Stand up on the balls of your feet. You want to stay low on the bike with your head forward but your butt should be back. Look at you tube vids of Barcia or Eli Tomac. See how they poke their butts out over the rear fender and get down. They bend at the waist. The important thing is to never be static....that is you should always be flowing with the bike.

On those fast straights (that are almost lame because you do nothing but wind your motor out) you have to be ready for the bike to get kicked. Last time I went to a fast track there was a straight that had a random bump in it that I never saw. It tossed the bikes rearend up and sideways a bit. I was in a position where I didn't get tossed because I didn't have my waist over the clamps- just my head.

We should start a thread about how the styles are changing these days. The young guns seem to be crouched down just hovering above the saddle. The classic position sees riders standing up taller in the classic attack position.

Anyway. Remember to have your legs bent just slightly from locked ready to absorb. Poke that butt out and squeeze your calves to the frame so you are secure. Elbows up (nothing crazy) and helmet over the clamps. Let the bike do its thing under you and don't death grip it. Feel the flow my son and thank for reading.👍

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So u do this on every type of terrain then sand and hardpack? I put my bike on its' stand and got on it in the position u described and i've gotta say it felt strange to me because i've never been on it like that before. I've always stayed central on the seat but i suppose it's something i'll get used to.

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Hello, can anybody tell me how to position your body to go fast on a straight. I'm only asking because when i tried going fast on a straight i was standing up, got headshake, lost control of my front wheel and crashed. So now i'm assuming it's wrong to be standing up but how do you do it. Are you meant to sit towards the front of the bike or the rear or what? I have no idea but i want to know because i don't feel like i can go very fast on the track anymore from fear of crashing again. 👍 Thanks for any advice.

It's hard to say where your body position should be on a fast straight cus body position is more like body movement always changing according to the conditions.

Straights are usually the easiest but because of the speed you can really crash hard. Of course most of it depends on the soil condition and the room you have for mistakes. If you’re speeding through the trees over rocks, tree roots, ruts and mud you better keep her under control the entire time. Another straight condition may be over big uneven bumps. Whatever the condition are following are some key points.

A. Scan the ground as you’re going along and see all the details. At the same time keep your focus out far enough ahead of you that you are ready for what’s coming up. This takes the kind of concentration to light a news paper with a magnifying glass in the sun.

B. If it is at all rough you should be standing on the pegs in the central body position and make the bike go exactly where you want it to go. The thing that is most likely to through you off course is hitting something with your front wheel that you didn’t see.

C. Stay in the right gear (in the meat of the power) and if it’s really technical keep your foot on the rear brake, not just to slow down fast but to give you more control. Think about it; the only control you have over the M/C is body movement and the five controls (front and rear brakes, clutch and throttle and the gear shift). What else could there be? But there are 47 Absolute Techniques that go into these two categories. Check out my Motocross Practice Manual for all of them.

Going fast on the straights is kind of like jumping doubles. You don’t jump distances you don’t have control over and you shouldn’t do speeds over rough ground that you don’t have control over. If the fear is there it’s most likely there for a good reason. When you get enough seat time and confidence the control will be there and the fear will not. In the mean time you may consider paying attention to that fear, it’s a survival instinct.

You can see a free Motocross Techniques DVD preview titled "Body Positions and Movements" and/or order online at; http://wp.gsmxs.com/dvd-1-body-positions-and-movements/

If you want the download version find it at; www.mxraceschool.com

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Not sure what people think about this, but I learned through doing some suspension testing the last time I was out that if you have your front rebound set really slow (way turned in) that over somewhat uneven terrain there is a higher tendancy for headshake. I would deduce that this is because the front wheel isn't geting back down to the ground in time from it's ocmpression stroke over a bump, which in turn is keeping the front wheel lighter longer.

So consider a suspension setting as a possibility as well?

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Well when i got the bike i had its suspension lowered to its lowest level so it was like that when i crashed. It's been to the garage since and i've had it's suspension set higher so idk whether that'll help or not.

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