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Recommendations for quality trailers?

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Hi all -- I'm new to the forum. This seems to be one of the only places online where you can discuss trailers. (at least that I've found)

Anyway, I'm looking for some recommendations on good quality trailer manufacturers for car hauling. I know about the main brands (Wells Cargo, Haulmark, Pace, etc.) but am trying to avoid paying for the brand name.

What I would like is a high quality trailer, including things like tubular steel frame (vs. c-channel), welded side doors (vs. bolt ons), single piece roof, etc.

Can anyone recommend a less well known brand of trailer that has all or most of the quality of a Wells Cargo without the brand name premium? (Ideally with delivery facilities on the west coast)

Thanks.

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Get what ya pay for,IMO.

I have a haulmark that 10-12 years old with countless miles on it and its as sturdy as the day I bought it. However I haul motorcycles not cars.

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I to have a Haulmark. Bought it 2000, 24ft that we haul bikes in. Still a solid trailer.

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I just went through the research and decision phase and decided on an Interstate trailer from trailers plus. The cargo mates were also very competitive, but my local dealer had an unreasonable markup. I also studied Pace, Continental Cargo, and Wells Cargo. You will find that most of the trailers are very similar. I ended up buying a 24' extended height monster (I haul cars, including lifted trucks). The "upgrade" options were very close to materials cost, ie add 12v battery for $90. I bought an interstate simply because it was $1000 less with equivalent materials, but that was because of the dealer. I vote Interstate or Cargomate, dont skimp on axles or LED lights because it pays off in the long run.

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there's almost no diff until you go up to aluminum

do yourself a favor and get one with trailer brakes, makes towing them much less stressful

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there's almost no diff until you go up to aluminum

Yes, there is.

Thickness of wall sheathing, frame size and material, coatings, fastenings, wood used in flooring (many of the lower price point trailers use non-treated wood), wall stud spacing, floor support spacing and material, wiring gauge and protection, etc.

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maybe on big trailers but not on small ones, when I bought mine I measured the frame rails and they were all the exact same

even when I worked at featherlight the trailer walls were as thin as they could be, I built trailers on the custom assembly line

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maybe on big trailers but not on small ones, when I bought mine I measured the frame rails and they were all the exact same

even when I worked at featherlight the trailer walls were as thin as they could be, I built trailers on the custom assembly line

Was it the same rated steel?

Just cuz the metal is the same thickness doesn't mean it's the strength.

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I wont get into it with you, all i'll say on this is they are all basically the same from what I've seen, and I used to build trailers for one of the best trailer companies in the US.

pay attention to the distance between floor joists, and make sure they sealed the seams on the top good, and splurge for trailer brakes, it really does make a big difference

I bought one from a local company, single axle with brakes, 6x12 v nose, fully wired for a generator, with lights/outlets and finished inside, walls & roof, ramp rear and regular door with camper latch on the side, it works great for us.

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Was it the same rated steel?

Just cuz the metal is the same thickness doesn't mean it's the strength.

I wont get into it with you, all i'll say on this is they are all basically the same from what I've seen, and I used to build trailers for one of the best trailer companies in the US.

pay attention to the distance between floor joists, and make sure they sealed the seams on the top good, and splurge for trailer brakes, it really does make a big difference

I bought one from a local company, single axle with brakes, 6x12 v nose, fully wired for a generator, with lights/outlets and finished inside, walls & roof, ramp rear and regular door with camper latch on the side, it works great for us.

Chckenhauler, I understand what you are getting at, but I am withMega. After getting on my back underneath the brands mentioned above, and after crawling all over mine to install e-track and paint, there are minor differences but they were very similar. Same thickness aluminum wall, same 3/4" plywood floor, same brand radial tires, and dexter axles. Now some brands dont have equivalent materials on the bargain model, but if you add options to make them equivalent, you pay about the same price.

To the original poster, there are a few must haves in my book that are sometimes options- including radial tires, a spare, and rear loadlights. A spare tire was a $70 option and the rear cargo loading lights were only $30. That is a bargain.

I belive brakes on any trailer 3500lbs and above are required in WA, but if your state does not require it, pay the extra $100. It is well worth the safety and comfort.

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Chckenhauler, I understand what you are getting at, but I am withMega. After getting on my back underneath the brands mentioned above, and after crawling all over mine to install e-track and paint, there are minor differences but they were very similar. Same thickness aluminum wall, same 3/4" plywood floor, same brand radial tires, and dexter axles. Now some brands dont have equivalent materials on the bargain model, but if you add options to make them equivalent, you pay about the same price.

That's where I was trying to go with that, kinda got sidetracked.:thumbsup:

You have to take the time to add in the upgrades, options, etc so you're comparing apples to apples.

To the original poster, there are a few must haves in my book that are sometimes options- including radial tires, a spare, and rear loadlights. A spare tire was a $70 option and the rear cargo loading lights were only $30. That is a bargain.

I belive brakes on any trailer 3500lbs and above are required in WA, but if your state does not require it, pay the extra $100. It is well worth the safety and comfort.

I do believe the 3500 lb threshold rule is a Fed Law (which means the states should have a similar law on the books or risk loss of Fed Hwy Funds). Same goes for tandem axle (gotta have brakes).

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Thanks for all the replies and feedback. I ended up going with an Interstate Cargo trailer -- their "Interstate Car Carrier" brand. It has brakes on both axles, rear load lights and seemed to be well reviewed by various folks around the internet.

I appreciate all the help!

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