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high speed video to record suspension action

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Hi,

I would be interest in hearig about anybody's experience using a high speed video camcorder to record suspension action.

For example:

- what camcorder did you use

- how did you set up to get the recordings

- what were the frames per second

- what software was used to view the recordings

- did you find it useful and learn anything new

- were you able to actually use it to analyze the suspensions performance and make improvements

-etc

Kevin

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I think i was the first to use it here on TT.

It's an EX-F1

I'm using 300fps and experimented with 600fps. But 300 was enough.

I learned few things from watching it, less then i was hoping :thumbsup:, but i think it helped me to clear some doubts that i couldn't understand otherwise.

Yes it's very good to analyze what it's happening, for example, once the rider complained that the back was coming out on hard dirt curves, but the vids proved that the front was washing and the corrections for this was the cause for what he felt.

You can see some of my vids, http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=706866&highlight=300fps

Now i really want a data acquisition :ride:)

Edited by floting

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I think the ex-f1 is still the only consumer grade camera in that price range that offers 300fps at a decent resolution.

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I use a canon for made a 300 fps and see on pc with video deluxe premium 17.

It s good to undestand the suspension working .the reb of fork and shock and you can see when you have an idraulic lock

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Thanks for the replies. Will have to check out the EX-F1.

Now my question is, what would you expect to get out of data acquisition?

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Now my question is, what would you expect to get out of data acquisition?

first I would measure typical speeds of different fork/shock actions

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That makes sense. Find out the approximate velocities of the various bumps and obsticals on the track. Such as, what are the velocites for the forks and shocks on:

- jump faces

- jump landings

- thru the woops

- acceleration bumps

- braking bumps

- etc

Does anyone have any ides of these velocitie?

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That makes sense. Find out the approximate velocities of the various bumps and obsticals on the track. Such as, what are the velocites for the forks and shocks on:

- jump faces - absolutely low speed! add some bypass to your clicker and it bottoms out

- jump landings - hitting the landing or overjump :ride:

Does anyone have any ides of these velocitie?

I have data aquisition,but not a portable one :thumbsup:

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How exactly does that work not being portable?

- 230Volt supply

- big

- heavy

- too expensive to destroy...

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The suspension velocity one can see with high-speed camera, no problem, but it's easier with DAQ. If i'll find a little time this days, i'll post a clip so everyone could see an calculate the velocity.

I want DAQ first and foremost to see how it's influenced the front by the back and vice-versa and how much. But i want to logg together with velocity and travel the acceleration of the front and back. So it's needed a 4 channel DAQ, 2 position transducers and 2 accelerometers. Then we will have real data to analyze.

If the market will get better i will put together this system, but as the things are now i can't justify the investment.

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The videos were very cool, but how do you translate that to actual fork or shock velocities.

i would say a shock dyno.

Edited by GDI70

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The videos were very cool, but how do you translate that to actual fork or shock velocities.

If you knew what the forward speed of the bike was, and had the right editing software, you could calculate axle and rod velocity...and even acceleration. Just a function of time and distance. :thumbsup:

Of course, you could also run some acquisition equipment (linear potentiometer) and then clock/time it with the camera.

That said...the bigger question is what would you do with the information...as it needs to be translated against the terrain and what the internals of the suspensions are doing under those conditions?

The greatest challenge in suspension set-up/design is translation.

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If you knew what the forward speed of the bike was, and had the right editing software, you could calculate axle and rod velocity...and even acceleration. Just a function of time and distance. :thumbsup:

Of course, you could also run some acquisition equipment (linear potentiometer) and then clock/time it with the camera.

That said...the bigger question is what would you do with the information...as it needs to be translated against the terrain and what the internals of the suspensions are doing under those conditions?

The greatest challenge in suspension set-up/design is translation.

Not to mention the vast input of the riders body position as it relates to the suspensions action, throttle control and more.

:ride: This is what I do like about video it does show this relationship

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That said...the bigger question is what would you do with the information...as it needs to be translated against the terrain and what the internals of the suspensions are doing under those conditions?

The greatest challenge in suspension set-up/design is translation.

agree 100%

at least you need a dyno to test your components for the determined speeds.

that may help you, but will it work on the track...

Edited by kawamaha

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watching some of the vids i have to question if a rider slams into the face of a whoop its going to use a lot of travel and rebound a decent amount.

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the dyno is a good tool, but to have one that can measure the speeds accurately is another story. the jgr dyno measures upto 8m/sec, the factory showa dyno goes to 11m/sec. now, whose got the money for that bad boy?

the linear potentiometer is a good tool. (excluding the butt dyno-you can't put a price on that!) race tech sells one for quite a bit of change; a potentiometer, not a butt dyno.

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