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Which bike to look into for my old lady.

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Im currently looking at gettin my girlfriend a bike this winter to start off riding next spring. She has never been in control of a dirtbike so she is not too good with a clutch. I am also looking for something that will be bulletproof. She is around 5'6'' 125 lbs not too worried about seat height she is all legs. Thanks for the advice in advance :thumbsup:

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You might try a Honda CRF150F...very beginner friendly, bulletproof like the XRs (basically is an XR), and small and light enough for someone her size to handle. If she was a little bigger, I might suggest a XR200, but that bike may be too heavy. Another option may be a TTR125 big wheel. My friend has one for his son and they are good bikes...similar to the CRF150F. It also depends on your budget.

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Moto Rider suggested some good bikes. A TTR125 big wheel may be on the small side. I would go for an XR200.

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Either you start with a fofo bike like a TTR 125, KLX 140 etc etc. Get one with electric start, no substitutes. They will fall over ALOT and nothing can turn you off quicker then having to kick a flooded bike over till shes blue in the face. Buy used, they hold their value well and shes going to crash and break stuff. Now, if she has a little experience (my second girlfried was) I bought a good used 06 YZ 125. You can lower it, cut the seat, easy to start and she can grow into it. The power band can be a little rough at first but they will get used to it. All in all she might not like riding at all and now you have a second bike.

Start in a big grassy feild and let her ride around and around and around. Do long wide corners and bring them in tighter and tighter when shes ready. Practice lots of take off/stoppin routines. lay the bike over and show her proper technic on how to pick it up, balance on one/two feet, lay out a few things and make a small course in the field. If she misses a corner she can just go wide where as if its tight, she panics and runs into shit.

Oh, and good luck. I have taught two girlfriends how to ride and both the same way, they are both very good riders now. Consistency is key. It can be a real test of your realtionship too.

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I bought my wife a KLX140L (big wheel). She's around 5'3" and this bike has the shortest seat height of all the bikes stock. She can touch with the balls of her feet, she could probably use another 2 inches of legs. This bike also happened to have fully adjustable suspension and rear disc brakes, no other brands did. Is this crucial or necessary - no?, but it was also the cheapest out of the bunch. I bought a brand new 2011 in July of 2011 for 3200 OTD. Yes she has dropped the bike and it'll probably depreciate quite a bit, but I know this bike will last forever and be most reliable. These things are great beginner bikes, this bike is hard to stall. It'll chug up any hill in any gear for an average sized person. This bike is a lot of fun to ride around the camp. I know my wife will not outgrow the power of this bike for a long time. This bike is also super quite, probably my favorite of the whole thing.

As the person earlier suggested about the 125 2-stroke, only do this if the girl has riding experience. If your girl is learning to use a clutch, that is not the bike to practice on. It is no fun to help kick, or pick up a bike that is too big for the person. You can also turn someone off of riding on a bike like a 125 when learning.

You might try a Honda CRF150F...very beginner friendly, bulletproof like the XRs (basically is an XR), and small and light enough for someone her size to handle. If she was a little bigger, I might suggest a XR200, but that bike may be too heavy. Another option may be a TTR125 big wheel. My friend has one for his son and they are good bikes...similar to the CRF150F. It also depends on your budget.

If you want to pay top dollar for old technology, your choice.

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As the person earlier suggested about the 125 2-stroke, only do this if the girl has riding experience. If your girl is learning to use a clutch, that is not the bike to practice on. It is no fun to help kick, or pick up a bike that is too big for the person. You can also turn someone off of riding on a bike like a 125 when learning.

I'm curious about this. I'm looking into a 125 for my wife. She can drive a 6-speed car, think she would be Ok? I'm trying to get her into the sport, not turn her off of it.

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I'm curious about this. I'm looking into a 125 for my wife. She can drive a 6-speed car, think she would be Ok? I'm trying to get her into the sport, not turn her off of it.

Not really the same as a car. The lack of bottom end make them difficult to ride easily. Do I recommend it, yes if she has some experience. My girlfriend has a DRZ 400 so she had some experience with using a clutch. The nice thing is that the technology is updated and she has grown into it. Maybe a KTM 200? The down side is the price is going up. Stick with something small like a Kawasaki 140L (large wheel) till she gets the hang of it and then move into something bigger in the future.

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As a girl, I'd say if shes serious and she wants to learn really bad you should get something a little bigger.

I am a girl and I ALWAYS knew I wanted to ride a bike. I knew how to drive a 5 speed car, which actually i think DID help, especially with starting to get going.

I started on an 85, but thats too short for your "old lady"(LOL) so I'd say a 125 would be good. Learning on a 2t will teach her technique that will benefit when she switches to a 4t. After 5 months on my 85 I now ride my hubbys 250f, and yes I kick start it myself and pick it up myself. I'm 5'3 130lbs.

I'd say be supportive of her while learning, but let her do it on her own, aka let her kick her own bike. what happens if she falls and you're not there to kick it for her?

imo 4t's are too heavy.

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E-start, for sure.

Used KLX140L or CRF150F.

If / when she is ready to move on, just sell it. Better than starting out (& struggling) with a 125 2T with a tall saddle and no torque.

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Im currently looking at gettin my girlfriend a bike this winter to start off riding next spring. She has never been in control of a dirtbike so she is not too good with a clutch. I am also looking for something that will be bulletproof. She is around 5'6'' 125 lbs not too worried about seat height she is all legs. Thanks for the advice in advance :thumbsup:

kawasaki kdx 220

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E-start, for sure.

Used KLX140L or CRF150F.

If / when she is ready to move on, just sell it. Better than starting out (& struggling) with a 125 2T with a tall saddle and no torque.

/thread

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You would have to lower the KDX for her height. They are tall bikes...I owned one.

Also, a KDX has alot of low end torque and can pull the front end up easily...could mean trouble for a complete newbie.

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As the person earlier suggested about the 125 2-stroke, only do this if the girl has riding experience. If your girl is learning to use a clutch, that is not the bike to practice on. It is no fun to help kick, or pick up a bike that is too big for the person. You can also turn someone off of riding on a bike like a 125 when learning.

If you want to pay top dollar for old technology, your choice.

I agree with the 125 MX comment...its really not a good complete newbie bike. No experience operating a [motorcycle] clutch and snappy power could get ugly very quickly. It will only lead to frustration and likely backfire on you...op.

As far as the top dollar for old technology comment...you can buy a 2005-2007 CRF150 around here for $1500-$1600. Why would you spend $3-$4K on a bike that is likely to be have the hell beat out of it during the learning curve? Also, there is no guaranty that she will like riding. So, if you buy a new bike and she doesnt like it, you will eat alot of depreciation. Lets not forget that the CRF150 is the offspring of the XR...likely the most reliable low maintenance dirt bike ever built.

BTW - Disc brakes dont mean didly to a newbie.

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Thanks for all the advice guys :thumbsup: I think I am gonna lean more towards a TTR125 or something along those lines. Like I said before she has zero experience one a dirtbike so I dont want to buy a bike too big for her to ride and her to get hurt or injured and never want to ride a bike again. Thanks again to all :ride:

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I agree with the 125 MX comment...its really not a good complete newbie bike. No experience operating a [motorcycle] clutch and snappy power could get ugly very quickly. It will only lead to frustration and likely backfire on you...op.

As far as the top dollar for old technology comment...you can buy a 2005-2007 CRF150 around here for $1500-$1600. Why would you spend $3-$4K on a bike that is likely to be have the hell beat out of it during the learning curve? Also, there is no guaranty that she will like riding. So, if you buy a new bike and she doesnt like it, you will eat alot of depreciation. Lets not forget that the CRF150 is the offspring of the XR...likely the most reliable low maintenance dirt bike ever built.

BTW - Disc brakes dont mean didly to a newbie.

I'm the type who would rather pay double now and never worry about something, than buy something cheap and worry if someone "beat the hell out of it" prior to my usage. The CRF was the most expensive used and new bike at least where I live. Check prices on used KLX's. The Honda dealership was not even willing to negotiate, on the terms of, "well it is a Honda:worthy:". BS. Same attitude that Toyota dealerships carry.:busted:

The learning curve - yes my wife has dropped the bike a few times, but scratched plastics are the least of my concerns at this point. My wife will never excel the capabilities of this bike, so this initial investment should last a very long time. My wife rode prior to getting the KLX, but I see your concern of not wanting to continue. If that was to happen no worries to me.

Disc brakes probably mean nothing to a newbie (maybe true), but why pay more money for a bike that has older technology in more than one aspect, just because? No thanks.

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Thanks for all the advice guys :busted: I think I am gonna lean more towards a TTR125 or something along those lines. Like I said before she has zero experience one a dirtbike so I dont want to buy a bike too big for her to ride and her to get hurt or injured and never want to ride a bike again. Thanks again to all :busted:

Not a bad choice, if the TTR125 was a little cheaper, and a little shorter we probably would have purchased a 2011. The dealership was also not willing to negotiate at all. Bummer. :bonk: Then we looked at the KLX and were glad we left Honda and Yamaha behind.

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I started my GF out on a CRF230, she's 5'11" so the 230 is short enough she could peddle her way through tough spots if needed. The e-start is a real confidence builder, restarts in challenging terrain is a non issue. After a year she was ready for better suspension and we moved her to a KDX200, she picked up a LOT of speed, but I think she would have really struggled with the KDX the first year.

I'd get her a torquey 4t with a seat height that allows her to plant both feet flat on the ground (XR100, CRF150, KLX140, etc.). Let her gain some confidence and see if she's aggressive enough to move to a more capable bike the 2nd or 3rd year out. If you go with a used XR/CRF/KLX, you'll get most if not all your money back when you need to move on.

The worst thing you can do (IMO) is to put a new rider on a bike that is too tall with peaky power, you run the risk of turning them off to the sport before they get the skill to really see what it's all about.

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