Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Bel Ray 80w-90 In EXC 200?

Recommended Posts

Recently had to pull my PV clutch mechanism and now need to replace my fluid. I stop by a local power-sports place and bought some BelRay 80w-90 for the gearbox, but noticed that its a GL5 and the motor calls for GL4 type fluid. In the past I have had issues with swapping these types out in my rally car due to sticky LSDs, but am not sure about the bikes clutch. Any insight would be appreciated.

Thanks

LP

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

80\90 is a Hypoid oil for shaft drive not a 2 stroke gear oil. A 75 wt. 2- stroke gear lube would work better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Recently had to pull my PV clutch mechanism and now need to replace my fluid. I stop by a local power-sports place and bought some BelRay 80w-90 for the gearbox, but noticed that its a GL5 and the motor calls for GL4 type fluid. In the past I have had issues with swapping these types out in my rally car due to sticky LSDs, but am not sure about the bikes clutch. Any insight would be appreciated.

Thanks

LP

Maxima makes a manual tranny lube, its called MTL, it comes in 75, 80 and 90. I use the MTL 80, its equal to what the mfg called for, ie the motor oil. Not sure if yours is designed for bikes, but being made by Bel Ray... Unless like Fred mentioned, hypoid, maybe a shaft drive bike???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been using Belray gear oil in my 200's for years and it works great.It was designed for that purpose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thats funny because ktm manual called for 80 hypoid oil in the bigger 2strokes years ago.

Maybe the old Dura Lube days? Hypoid is a rear end oil but Dura Lube had trans oil that weight. You could put 10/40 in there and it would work. Just depends on how well you want it to work. What is in the manual is only a recommendation anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neither of you know anything about oils. particulary gear oil. ill leave on that note

Well, if you know so much, why didnt you answer his question? That is why he came in here. I just pointed out there is manual tranny oils for motorcycles in that weight (which is close to 15/50 engine oil), I didnt want to give the go ahead on his oil because I wasnt sure if it was compatible with a wet clutch, thinking maybe is was for a diff only. I suppose he can read the back of his bottle better than I. :thumbsup::ride:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The manual calls for "engine oil 80w (shell gear EP 80)

'91 manual says 80 hypoid oil. cant remember exact year seems like '92 but theres another year manual that says shell spirax 80 which is gear oil. to best of my knowledge shell doesnt have a straight 80 anymore (that ktm book was writen some years ago). its now called spirax 80w90. gear oil is for hypoid, spur, bevel gears etc. which is whats in a bike tranny and every other kind of tranny. theres also cylinder roller bearings in a axle and automoblie tranny, which is the same bearings in alot of bike trannys. 80w90 operating temp viscosity is nearly the same as 10w40 probly closer to 20/50. point is any type of oil will work in these bikes and saying gear oil is only for shaft drive seems a foolish statement. tranny fliud, gear oil, motor oil, hydraulic fluid, they will all work fine. ive tried everything but hydraulic stuff but i hear it works great. hydraulic oil is used in tractor trannys with gears, bearings and such. many pick up trannys over the years used gear oil and some still call for it today. '04 tacoma manual says GL5 gear oil in there manual tranny, 80w/90 if i recall. same spur gears and bearings as dirt bike. only diference is bike has clutch plates but gear oil works just fine in wet clutch. your bike wont know the difference so use what you want. buy $10qaurt amsoil for all i care

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If anybody wants to read the label on the Bel Ray 80w90 they'll notice that it says "not reccommended for wet clutches".

Take it back and exchange it for some 75 or 80 weight gearsaver. Or send the 80w90 to me, I've got an empty bottle sitting here to remind me to get some more. It works great in bikes with seperated clutch/transmissions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gear saver 80 it is... The "80w-90 hypoid reads "for heavily loaded transmissions and final drive units including LSDs..." I just assumed a wet clutch is similar to a plate type LSD.

Thanks

lp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If anybody wants to read the label on the Bel Ray 80w90 they'll notice that it says "not reccommended for wet clutches".

Take it back and exchange it for some 75 or 80 weight gearsaver. Or send the 80w90 to me, I've got an empty bottle sitting here to remind me to get some more. It works great in bikes with seperated clutch/transmissions.

Thanks for clearing that up motovita. Over the 30 years I worked in the motorcylce industry I found that a light weight oil worked best in a KTM. In 1993 they would not start in gear with the recommended Dura Lube. I tried Silkolene 75wt in the trans. And guess what my bike would start in gear all the time. What KTM recommends is not all ways the best. As I said earlier 10/40 would work just fine. Just what ever you use change it every few rides and you will be fine. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
'91 manual says 80 hypoid oil. cant remember exact year seems like '92 but theres another year manual that says shell spirax 80 which is gear oil. to best of my knowledge shell doesnt have a straight 80 anymore (that ktm book was writen some years ago). its now called spirax 80w90. gear oil is for hypoid, spur, bevel gears etc. which is whats in a bike tranny and every other kind of tranny. theres also cylinder roller bearings in a axle and automoblie tranny, which is the same bearings in alot of bike trannys. 80w90 operating temp viscosity is nearly the same as 10w40 probly closer to 20/50. point is any type of oil will work in these bikes and saying gear oil is only for shaft drive seems a foolish statement. tranny fliud, gear oil, motor oil, hydraulic fluid, they will all work fine. ive tried everything but hydraulic stuff but i hear it works great. hydraulic oil is used in tractor trannys with gears, bearings and such. many pick up trannys over the years used gear oil and some still call for it today. '04 tacoma manual says GL5 gear oil in there manual tranny, 80w/90 if i recall. same spur gears and bearings as dirt bike. only diference is bike has clutch plates but gear oil works just fine in wet clutch. your bike wont know the difference so use what you want. buy $10qaurt amsoil for all i care

It wasnt the gears anyone was concerned over, it was the wet clutch is what we where concerned with. If it mention hypoid only, we know its not for bevel gears and probably not compatible with a wet clutch either. We havent even gotten into friction modifiers.

http://www.smartsynthetics.com/articles/motorcycle_oil_technical_facts.htm

Motorcycle crankcase oils are specially formulated for motorcycle applications that have wet clutches. Most automotive oils are not suitable for use in motorcycle engines. A premium quality motorcycle specific oil typically has higher levels of anti-wear chemistry such as zinc and phosphorus than some automotive oils do, which are critical in protecting high RPM and high load and engines from wear

And as it turns out, looks like the oil the original poster had was meant more for automotive type differentials and certainly not a bike transmission with a wet clutch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It wasnt the gears anyone was concerned over, it was the wet clutch is what we where concerned with. If it mention hypoid only, we know its not for bevel gears and probably not compatible with a wet clutch either. We havent even gotten into friction modifiers.

http://www.smartsynthetics.com/articles/motorcycle_oil_technical_facts.htm

And as it turns out, looks like the oil the original poster had was meant more for automotive type differentials and certainly not a bike transmission with a wet clutch.

this is directly copied and pasted from the shell website regarding their 80w90 gear oil. here is the link if you care to see for yourself http://www-static.shell.com/static/usa/downloads/lubricants/cs5861_42_sh_spirax_hd_flyr.pdf

Suitable for hypoid, spur, bevel, helical, spiral-bevel

and worm gears in heavy-duty truck and passenger car

differentials, transmissions, final drives, transfer cases

and steering mechanisms

your valvoline, qaker state, penzoil, etc gearoil bottles are gonna say something similar. i can only speak for shell gear oil but it does no harm to the clutch plates so far in my real world experience. but you never know, maybe i have some slight clutch damage that only a chemical engineer could see under his microscope

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
this is directly copied and pasted from the shell website regarding their 80w90 gear oil....

Ok, but you know he was asking about his "Bel Ray" oil, right????:thumbsup:

I looked at your link, it did mention, trucks, tractors, cars, truck, farm equipment, but didnt mention motorcycles.

I see no mention of wet clutch applications on your post???

http://www.smartsynthetics.com/articles/motorcycle_oil_technical_facts.htm

Motorcycle crankcase oils are specially formulated for motorcycle applications that have wet clutches. Most automotive oils are not suitable for use in motorcycle engines.

Using any oil in the gearbox is going to work, but it may not be designed for it. Heck, I can cool my bike with salt water too.

We are going to have to agree to disagree I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The oil in question "Bel Ray 80w 90" was never intened for a wet clutch. That was what was asked. Now if were talking about the old sintered cluches it might be a different story but we are not. In a 200 a 75wt trans oil would work best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ya well ATF doesnt say "for motor cycles" on the side of the bottle either. whats your response to the thousands of people using it in their dirtbikes ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×