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Long distance towing. First time

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Taking a trip from Delaware to Oklahoma for the week of Thanksgiving. Taking the Toy Hauler (Raptor 365LEV) to stay in while we are there.

I've towed plenty but nothing more than 6-8 hours away. I plan on winterizing the unit beforehand and then de-winterizing when we get to our full hook up site (50 amp) and then winterizing before we head back. The trip is somewhere in the 24-26 hour range and we will stop to shower at truckstops unless the weather is warm enough to not worry about pipes freezing (hence the reason for winterizing).

Is there anything that I should plan for that would be different than a normal 3-4 hour trip? Any insight on how to find the "best" nicest truck stops along the way? The wife is not feeling the whole truck stop shower so to get her to agree, she only wants the finest.. Is there a national chain of truckstops that I should look for ?

Help, Please...

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24-26 hours ? that is 1 day. does she normally shower more than once a day ? are you planning on getting pretty dirty in the truck during the trip ? you could wash your hair in a sink at an interstate highway rest area if you needed to.

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What ?

Hauling no toys? Just a mobile hotel room?

Leave the trailer at home and stay in fine 150$/nite hotel rooms.....you will save money.

Trailering is a bitch I put up with to get heavy toys to riding location.

Think of the xtra wear, fuel and slower speeds and time etc. :thumbsup:

holiday traffic will be heavy extra anyhow.

U know fuel price is going to spike over the holidays.

just my thoughts......

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I'm agreeing with the hotel idea...but being it's a holiday weekend, if you don't already have reservations, you might be SOL.

Truckstops...Flying J, Love's, Petro, TA, Pilot, they all have decent, clean shower facilities. Essentially, the same thing you'd find in your bathroom at home-a private room with a lock on the door, toilet, sink, mirror, plugin for your shaver, curling iron, etc and a shower.

I would start with an in-depth inspection of both tow vehicle and trailer.

On the top of the list would be tire condition and pressure including spares, check trailer wheel bearings for lube condition and quantity, brakes, cooling system hoses, belts, levels, etc. Carry at least a quart or two of oil and some coolant, not to mention a healthy stock of washer fluid (get into some slop, and it goes fast).

Of course, the usual tools, jumper cables, make sure you have a jack to lift the trailer and change a flat, etc.

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Thanks, for the info. The Hotel option is out of the question as we are also carrying 5 dogs and 2 hawks. My wife is a Falconer and this is for the most part a hunting trip.

The plan is to drive 3-4 hours on the night of the 17th, then all day Friday and arrive some time on Saturday.

I bought this unit for traveling and appreciate the comments on fuel and saving but fortunately that is not an issue at this point. :thumbsup:

Jumper cables, and fluids are all accounted for. The truck (2008 F-450) will be going in for the 50k service next week.

I plan on taking an air compressor to blow out the lines for the return trip since the weather is unpredictable and will most likely get down to freezing.

I will write down all of the truckstops that were mentioned above and keep them for reference. Thanks CH!

The RV site is $80 a week for full hook ups so 150/night x10 nights =$1500, (about makes up for fuel costs), for a cramped hotel room. So I figured we would take our time getting out there, not pretending that we are driving a sports car and be responsible. We will have more creature comforts and be better suited.

Thanks again to everyone.

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I think that you're perspective will change once this trip begins. I left Yorktown, Va in 2001 and drove to Billings, Mt stopped in Iowa and slept in a truck stop for 4 hours. It took me just a little ove 2 days, but it was just me.

Towing across country pulling the car with the wife and dog pulling 10 hour days averaging between 600-750 miles a day. Oklahoma is a long way away, but to answer you question.

Tire Chains!

I covered 1100 miles once, Coos Bay, Or to Billings. The wife got pissed cause I only stopped once for fuel and subway. It took 18 hours.

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I think that you're perspective will change once this trip begins. I left Yorktown, Va in 2001 and drove to Billings, Mt stopped in Iowa and slept in a truck stop for 4 hours. It took me just a little ove 2 days, but it was just me.

I always like to plan on the conservative side. I have been known to drive until I run out of gas without stopping but I dont like to put that on the wife or the dogs.

Being a former Marine, being on time is still instilled in my lifestyle. So when I set the time frame I like to plan and account for the unknown.

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I always like to plan on the conservative side. I have been known to drive until I run out of gas without stopping but I dont like to put that on the wife or the dogs.

Being a former Marine, being on time is still instilled in my lifestyle. So when I set the time frame I like to plan and account for the unknown.

Roger that:thumbsup:

Thanks for your service.

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pre-trip inspection of the obvious, and the not so obvious. I have done a denver to southern california trip solo (not towing) in 13.5 hours, (total stopped time on 3 fuel/bathroom stops was 24 minutes of that 13.5 hours)

When pulling my 33' trailer on long trips, I tend to make frequent stops for fuel and while fueling I take a reading on hub temps, tire temps, do a visual walk around for anything that doesn't look right. I've found that 200 mile increments keeps the family happy, and my posterior gets a break.

+1 on lots of windshield wash, as well as spare oil/coolant/etc.

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Thanks for your service.

Thank you

I will buy plenty of windshield wash this weekend.

200 miles sounds like a good round number. I hate searching for 5th wheel friendly gas stations when I'm low on fuel. Id rather top off a half tank of fuel than tear down a small gas station out of necessity.

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The RV site is $80 a week for full hook ups

Damn, that's cheap...just made some reservations for my parents in AZ recently, and that was $249/wk!

but to answer you question.

Tire Chains!

From DE to OK, shouldn't need any chains.

And if it's that bad, it's time to park (I don't believe any of the states he'll be traveling through have chain requirements).

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Unless it's really cold you may not need to winterize as you have planned. I think all your freshwater stuff should be inside. Inside should stay warm enough to prevent freezing during traveling if you had it warm while sleeping. Depending on the temp you could empty black and gray tanks after use along the way, then dump some antifreeze down the toilet and shower, since those tanks are outside.

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Having made similar trips between the coasts, I suggest you plan for bad weather. If you hit weather, you can add days depending on the severity. At most large truck stops near cities, there are hotels that cater to the traveler. The wife and I have spent serval nights in these hotels with no problems. Typically, the interstates get cleared pretty fast after the weather has cleared and during smaller weather situations, the roads stay clear, just slower. For time estimates, I plan on 50 mph. This generally takes into consideration, breaks, fuel stops, etc. I don't use chains. If it gets that bad, I am off the road. Take your time and enjoy the scenery.

Eagle1911

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Dogs in the back seat of the 450 (crew cab) crated.. And the birds will be in their boxes in the RV, strapped down or the bed of the truck depending on temperature.

Thanks again for all the advice and pointers. We are excited to make this trip and it starts in a little over a week.

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Some hotels will accept dogs and birds. I stayed in a Holiday Inn for a month with 2 birds once. And we still take our dog with us everywhere we go. 5 dogs and 2 hawks. Hmmm, that may be an issue. Not certain how the birds will react to the cold weather, but most likely, you could keep them in the trailer over night. If the dogs are small, you may be able to get them into a hotel, but not certain a hotel would accept 5 at one time.

While traveling, I would keep the birds inside the truck or trailer. Temperature would drive that decision. I would not put them in the back of the truck. I think the wind turbulence would cause some issues. It isn't as calm back there as it looks while traveling.

Have a safe trip.

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