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pivot log cross?

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A lot of that is time and experience. You need good clutch and throttle control. You get that through practice. You need enough rpm for the engine to have enough power to pivot on the rear axle when you hold back on the handle bars with enough force to not allow the entire bike to move too far forward when you rapidly engage the clutch. Do like the kids say (and I like to say) Pop a wheelie!

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Shouldn't make much of a difference with a heavier bike, the whole point is to make the bike to the work.

A lot of techniques like this are just getting the stones to do it, then you'll find out it's easy... Or if you're like me you might mess up a few times... But I'm kind of a chicken and it helps to just commit to it. I haven't tries this before, but after seeing the video I want to try it out.

I remember trying to learn 180 wheelie pivots on my trials bike. I was always afraid of trying them, but then I just decided to try it out and learned how easy it is! Now I just need to get the balls to try it on a full sized bike:smirk:

My point is, sometimes it's easier than it looks. My advice would be watch that video a few times. It does a good job of showing exactly what is happening. Then, if you can pop wheelies and are good at power sliding the rear, give it a try! Just make sure once you go to do it that you commit to doing it instead of trying half way and falling over... The worst that can happen is falling over and maybe scratching or denting something.

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If one end of the log is higher than the other (rarely are they level in the real world) angle in on it with the front wheel toward the high end of the log. That way when/if your frame comes down across the log it'll tip the bike toward you vs away from you.

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At first, try it just like the last take of the video. Pull up parallel and close to the log [As you gain confidence try it with the front wheel at the log and the rear at a 5 degree angle then try 10 degrees]. Stop. Put your foot on the log. Cover the rear brake. Feather the clutch out while increasing revs a little. Don't over do it. Lift and swing the front wheel to the side over the log. If the front comes up to far control it from looping out by hitting the rear brake. As you improve - put all the steps together at an increased pace.

As you feel comfortable with the method where you stop next to the log. Work up to trying the following: While standing approach the log at speed pulling up parallel and close to the log [later with the rear 5 and 10 degrees away from the log]. Hit the brakes hard with heavy bias on the front. Use the rebound of the front end to begin the loft of the front end. Continue to cover the rear brake. Feather the clutch out while increasing revs a little. Don't over do it. And swing the front wheel to the side over the log. At the same time your foot will drop to the log as the bike's front end falls from vertical towards the log. If the front comes up to far control it from looping out by hitting the rear brake. The point of doing it this way is that it will take less energy to loft the front wheel because you are using the energy of the compressed forks to loft the front wheel. Keep doing this approaching the log at a higher rate of speed requiring more front braking - this will make the move even easier because less throttle is require to loft the wheel and your momentum will carry you over the top of the log.

As the speed of your approaches increases, and your control improves it will become obvious that you do not need... nor will you want to put your foot on the log. At the end of the day you need to be able to do either of the three variations of the move to handle logs.

Hope this helps.

Edited by salgeek

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Very good explanation! I'll definitely be referencing this when I try this maneuver... Now I just need to find a log...

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If one end of the log is higher than the other (rarely are they level in the real world) angle in on it with the front wheel toward the high end of the log. That way when/if your frame comes down across the log it'll tip the bike toward you vs away from you.

This is a good rule of thumb. I've been working on this move for a while and I've found that when needing to just turn around in the trail i try to use this technique and it has made doing it over obstacles much easier. Start small. Try turning the bike over 90 degrees while planting a foot on a rock. Then move onto doing it over stuff

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try it on a real log though, not those wimpy things in the vids...

had to laugh listening to the news tonight about the storms in the NE, they said "trees the size you could put your arms around were down everywhere". LOL, as if those were big trees

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