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sand tracks technique!!!

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Ive been riding a lot of sand lately, and notice how different the rhythm is to harder packed tracks. ive gotten used to it but noticed that im CONSTANTLY pulling up on the bars to get the front end to float better over the nonstop rollers. just wondering if its just me or i have a setup issue?

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Nope, not just you. Sand takes a lot more back muscle, but you could try lowering the forks in the clamps a little if you didn't already to make the front a little lighter.

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Move da ass back.

ill keep that one in mind:thumbsup:

im glad that its not an issue with the bike, i will try moving the forks down some more though...

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Try to stand up as much as you can, It makes the hits much softer

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where i grew up racing down in n. cal. thats all we had was SAND tracks. i does take more upper body strength for sand, my dad alweays told us boys slide as far back on ur seat as u can and still maintain. And twist that throttle! it'll come to ya.

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When i ride sand tracks , i find that standing helps a lot as mentioned above , i stand almost the entire track if i can , as well as going a couple of clicks stiffer on the fork compression adjusters , it helps keep the front end up !

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heck you dont only have to stand but you have to WORK in order to keep speed. i do stand as much as possible as was mentioned its just all the dead lifting i have to go through to keep the bike blitzing over obstacles, my backs gonna be HUGE for next season!!! :busted:

will also try going a couple of clicks in on the compression but im hesitant on this because there are rough/choppy down and uphill sections too, dont want to compromise too much

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Yep I agree with everything said above and will just add; speed is a killer in sand. People assume to ride in sand, you basically ride like normal, but more towards the back of the bike to keep the front light. But in reality, riding in sand is more about understanding sand as a medium and what it does to your bike. The way most of us have been taught is to understand that sand is a constant drag on the machine and because of this drag, throttle and especially braking is extremely different. You can apply throttle much earlier in your turning with less consequence, especially when it comes to berms and ruts. If you focus on maintaining speed and using your lower body to manage the actual turning of the machine, you will probably go a lot quicker. The moment you slow down too much and have to manhandle the bike through the drag, you get worn out.

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If its real choppy , then also go IN on the rebound on the forks 1-2 clicks , it will take way some of the feedback you get thru the bars

so you mean slow down the rebound? wouldn't that make the chop worse? i know it would be better for the rollers but wouldn't the harshness be magnified over chop?

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Yep I agree with everything said above and will just add; speed is a killer in sand. People assume to ride in sand, you basically ride like normal, but more towards the back of the bike to keep the front light. But in reality, riding in sand is more about understanding sand as a medium and what it does to your bike. The way most of us have been taught is to understand that sand is a constant drag on the machine and because of this drag, throttle and especially braking is extremely different. You can apply throttle much earlier in your turning with less consequence, especially when it comes to berms and ruts. If you focus on maintaining speed and using your lower body to manage the actual turning of the machine, you will probably go a lot quicker. The moment you slow down too much and have to manhandle the bike through the drag, you get worn out.

well said, i like to think of it as a different rhythm. but i dont get tired, i just find myself pulling up on the bars A LOT to keep big hits from rollers transferring through the forks and onto my body... i just hope the sand doesn't ruin my technique on the hard stuff

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well said, i like to think of it as a different rhythm. but i dont get tired, i just find myself pulling up on the bars A LOT to keep big hits from rollers transferring through the forks and onto my body... i just hope the sand doesn't ruin my technique on the hard stuff

Sand is actually a fantastic learning tool, so is mud. You'll find a lot of good riders and pro's seek out sand and muddy conditions to practice because they are the hardest to get right and keep a good pace.

Sand is a lot of fun to ride in, I really like it a lot because of the lean angles and how much speed you need to carry. If you do it right and get in some good laps, it just feels epic! :busted:

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I really like it a lot because of the lean angles and how much speed you need to carry

took the words right outta my mouth :busted:

i did notice that sand DEMANDS you to hold your speed into a turn or else you get gobbled up. a good rhythm in the sand makes me feel like a hero, but you have to be consistent and find good lines too even get a rhythm going. im gonna be training on the stuff throughout the winter depending on how the weather holds up. i just hope that i wont get used to the sand too much that ill lose my rhythm on the hard stuff. i can already see myself braking too late into a turn and washing out...

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so you mean slow down the rebound? wouldn't that make the chop worse? i know it would be better for the rollers but wouldn't the harshness be magnified over chop?

With sand i have found the IN helps on braking bumps , for example i started at 12 on the rebound this was coming off a hard pack track , , to get the bike to stop beating me to death in the breaking bumps and other harsh square edge bumps , i turned the rebound IN , , i ended up at 10 on the Rebound , and i forgot to change it back when i went back to the hard packed track and the bike felt even better , so i left it at 10 and enjoy the ride more , now i have re-valved my bike so its pretty soft , as i had a Tech do it and the bike beat me to death so i have been messing with it myself , but i can tell you that going IN help me in the sand , as well as stiffer on the comp clickers

Dont criticize the riding as i am old , the kid i end up chasing i am older than his father , but this is the sand track i ride , its very rough (the video makes it look smoother than it actually is) just watch my front fender to see how rough it is , the track is very unforgiving you will see when i get to the end of the back straight going towards the corner , it kinda blurs the video its so choppy , going in on the rebound helped this tremendously

http://vimeo.com/30722277

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took the words right outta my mouth :busted:
:busted:

a good rhythm in the sand makes me feel like a hero, but you have to be consistent and find good lines too even get a rhythm going. im gonna be training on the stuff throughout the winter depending on how the weather holds up. i just hope that i wont get used to the sand too much that ill lose my rhythm on the hard stuff. i can already see myself braking too late into a turn and washing out...

Motocross is all about rhythm, so it should be no difference in the sand. Getting use to the sand won't hinder your hard pack riding skills at all. In fact, you'll have a better understanding of maintaining speed if you practice in the sand more often.

Ohh and at least out here, the sand tracks are much more forgiving when you crash, so pushing the limits is always fun!

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heh, i dont know about it being more forgiving on the body; i broke 2 collar bones and 5 ribs on sand in the past (thats why i need more training on it :busted:) but the rythm is definitely more free flowing. i need to flow a lot more to keep my speed, especially through turns. i can see how this can be a plus for training in general.

450xjim i will try going in on the rebound as suggested and see how it works, i can see it helping on the rollers but im not so sure about the chop. nice video, you can tell your standing a lot from your shadow:smirk: and the track does look pretty smooth in the video but then video tends to do that, i wish i could get a gopro to show off the track im at, its very retro in that its mostly natural terrain lots of hills with one step up, 3 jumps, and a table top.

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heh, i dont know about it being more forgiving on the body; i broke 2 collar bones and 5 ribs on sand in the past (thats why i need more training on it :busted:) but the rythm is definitely more free flowing. i need to flow a lot more to keep my speed, especially through turns. i can see how this can be a plus for training in general.

450xjim i will try going in on the rebound as suggested and see how it works, i can see it helping on the rollers but im not so sure about the chop. nice video, you can tell your standing a lot from your shadow:smirk: and the track does look pretty smooth in the video but then video tends to do that, i wish i could get a gopro to show off the track im at, its very retro in that its mostly natural terrain lots of hills with one step up, 3 jumps, and a table top.

Yea the track was very rough , it was much harder than the video lets on , and yes , i do stand a lot , sometimes in the corners as well , there are only a few spots on that track that i sit at all , and even then its only for a brief minute at most , and at my age its easier to stand as sitting tends to beat my back more

as far as camera , i have seen some people tape their cell phone to their helmet (dont crash) as they usually have enough memory to show more than a few minutes of video , or look on EBay and get one cheap , i paid $150 for mine (its the non HD , but the HD had not come out yet when i got mine) brand new at the Honda Dealer in Oregon where i bought one of my bikes , so there are deals around , just have to keep your eyes open for them

I see them on EBay for $50 -$100 all the time

Its not the 5 mega-pixel one (3 mp)but its cheap

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200671135945+

Here is a 5 mega-pixel one (same as what i have)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260885089810+

This is what i use to search for stuff on EBay , its called PicClick for EBay , just type in what your searching for and if its there it will find all the ads on EBay with your search , use different words as it will bring up different adds , like GoPro , or Go Pro , or GoPro Hero , or Helmet Cam , and you can view your search by Ending Soon , or Lowest Price , etc

http://picclick.com/

Below is the search where i found the 2 posted above

http://picclick.com/?q=GoPro+Hero&minAsk=min+price&maxAsk=max+price&zipCode=zip+code

Edited by 450XJimDirt

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