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Brake fluid and coolant changes

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Hi I have an 08 drz400s with 16000+ miles on the bike. It still has the original brake fluid and coolant in it. Original brake pads as well which seem to have a lot of life left based on the thickness of them and the rotor condition. The manual suggests changing the fluid every 2 years. Is it really necessary? It looks clean to me. What do you guys think?

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I change all fluids every season, but you might get away with it every 2 yrs.

Suzuki rec. changing the hose after 5 yrs.

You can't control the quality of oil just by looking at it..

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It does not take very long to change the fluid and it is really easy to do. I would replace it for the 45 min. of work (if it is your first time) and the $7 bucks.

Don't worry about getting a mighty vac, just get some tubing from the Pep boys and a old water bottle. Drill a hole in the cap of the water bottle and put one end of the tubing in the bottle and the other on the bleed nipple.

The coolant change is even easier if you check the DRZ FAQ, just did that myself last night. Get yourself a $10 bottle of water wetter and 2 gallons of "distilled water" at grocery store. 1 gallon to flush and the other to mix up for the new fluid. It will not take the whole new gallon.

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I agree.....takes little time to change the brake fluid and coolant. Worth swapping.

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Glycol-based brake fluid starts to absorb moisture from the moment it is put in the system. The fluid attracts moisture through microscopic pores in rubber hoses, past seals and exposure to the air.

B/F can also break down over time from excess heat that is created from within the brake system

Moisture contaminated brake fluid can do lots of internal damage and can be very costly for repair..So Yes, Definitely replace ....

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I am so tempted to say something that I shouldn't, because I like riding my bike more than working on it and some day I'll pay the price for this. I ride till it snows and then it's to cold to work on my bike until spring. At which time, its warm enough to ride again. Okay I'll say it. I've only changed the brake fluid and coolant once in 13,000 miles. My drz is crying from pain and suffering.

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Hi I have an 08 drz400s with 16000+ miles on the bike. It still has the original brake fluid and coolant in it. Original brake pads as well which seem to have a lot of life left based on the thickness of them and the rotor condition. The manual suggests changing the fluid every 2 years. Is it really necessary? It looks clean to me. What do you guys think?

As has been pointed out.. YES it’s important.

The degraded performance or damage done by old brake fluid is not obvious to the rider until it’s too late.

I.e. the wet fluid boils and you lose breaking, or the corrosion is done and things start leaking.

Other then DOT 5 Silicone brake fluid, the others are hydroscopic ,, they absorb moisture. Brake fluid that has absorbed moisture will boil at a much lower temp.. And that “wet” fluid, causes corrosion inside the system.

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Wow ok so I guess the answer to my question is a strong YES...I will be changing it very soon. Sounds like it is fairly cheap to do.

thank you.

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I like my mighty vac. It makes it so much easier to change fluids in all my vehicles.

I agree and have one myself, but I was just trying to make it cheap for him the first time. You never know he might do it on a regular basis if he likes the difference in the brake feel.

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Never use distilled water with anitfreeze, always use tap water.

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Never use distilled water with anitfreeze, always use tap water.

So with open mind I respond with my experience, 30 years of professional reading, instruction in power sport, industrial, military, aftermarket power sports manufactures and team mechanics, as well as a few published cites supporting a different personal opinion then yours on using Tap water to mix coolant..

Love to hear your opinion and supporting facts supporting use of hard water (tap water)

Maxima Brand:

Coolanol is a ready-to-use 50/50 blend of premium quality anti-freeze and deionized water

PEAK brand:

Can I mix ordinary tap water with antifreeze?

Yes, tap water is commonly used for mixing with antifreeze, however, deionized water or distilled water is preferred. Do not use water softened with salts to mix with antifreeze.

Independent research lab:

Antifreeze should be mixed with distilled water (tap water contains high amounts of minerals such as calcium and iron that can precipitate and coat internal parts) at the ratio of one part antifreeze to one part water.

From another independent manufacture of the base ingredients used in automotive coolants:

Using “hard” water out of the tap can cause scaling in the engine. Tap water is purified for drinking by chlorination, which kills germs but can cause corrosion in the engine. Even if you carefully measure the amounts of tap water and antifreeze to get the right blend, using tap water is not a good idea. Tap water also contains dissolved oxygen, calcium, magnesium, and other contaminates besides chlorine and chlorides that can significantly degrade corrosion inhibitor performance.

Castrol brand:

Coolant should not be mixed with hard tap water. Hard tap water has excessive calcium and magnesium deposits that can cause scaling, which will result in inadequate heat transfer. To avoid scaling, use only soft or de–ionized water that is not treated with salts or chlorides, when mixing water and antifreeze. (OEMs publish limits in parts per million (ppm) for hardness, chlorides, sulfates and total dissolved solids for the water used to dilute antifreeze.)

MAXSAFE Brand coolant:

Tap water is commonly used for mixing with antifreeze, however it must meet ASTM D-4985. Deionized water or distilled water is preferred as it has fewer reactive chemicals such as Magnesium, Silicate, Chloride, Oxygen, resulting in optimum coolant life and performance. Do not use water softened with salts to mix with antifreeze. Also, do not use well water as it normally is very high in mineral content.

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