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YZ250F Woods Bike - Potential Problems?

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Hey guys, I'm lookin' hard at getting my son a yz250f for primarily harescramble racing and trail riding. He's been on 2-strokes all his life but I think he'll ultimately be most successful on a 4t with the linear power delivery and traction and I think he's ready to get on one now.

The biggest reason the YZ and not a WR is weight. He's 14. He'll be fine with the height and power - he currently rides and has been racing a KTM 200 in 2hr harescrambles and even does fine on my RM250 now and then - but he already struggles a little when things get muddy and after going down a few times has to start picking up the bike. So I'm thinking with the lighter YZ he'll struggle less.

I've been reading up various recent models and I think a new left over '09 or '10 will be cost effective. I'm already pretty confident that I should get the forks/shocks revalved and I'll need to add some armour and handguards.

The thing I'm most worried about was a review of the '10 where the testers commented that it wouldn't be a very good woods bike in the tight sections because the bike wanted to "choke and die" . . .

REVIEW

That sounds like something I definitely don't want. Based on the review "choke and die" and "flameout" are related.

Is this really a big problem? Can someone explain to me what it's about?

Is there a way to reduce or eliminate "flameout"? I seem to remember that more flywheel weight will keep the motor rolling a bit better and reduce flameout . . . am I right about that?

Your feedback is important to me, thanks ahead of time.

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One other thing worth mentioning . . . I'm sure folks have come up with ways to reduce the weight on a WR250, if someone could summarize and conclude if it's really worth tryin it or not, that would also be very helpful.

Thanks!

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If you don't need E-Start, a YZ-F with a WR tranny, upgraded suspension, flywheel, and protection (BB, skid plate, etc) should do the trick. My YZ-F doesn't feel light compared to other enduro machines, but that's a whole other forum topic.

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The WR is the bike to get with E-start. You can take the lights off if necessary. We have YZs and a WR, the YZ is lighter, but without e-start, its less convenient. The gearing options are wide open with the WR. YZs like 13X50 or 51 and are limited to a slow top end in open sections with that gearing. WRs have 13X52 with a wide ratio tranny and can be geared down lower with a larger rear sprocket. Plus the WR is already sprung softly, where the YZ is not. My WR fork has a stiffer spring set and feels like my KTM 300 EXC and is about the same weight.

With that said, I installed a WR tranny in my YZ, and with the light flywheel, it will absolutely fly thru some the gnarliest stuff around and is not limited to top speed. I had the suspension revalved 3 times before we got it right. It is not the weapon for tight, rocky, or for wet riding conditions. The heavier flywheel of the WR is a saving grace in some conditions.

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I'm not sure about the flame out but I'm sure that proper jetting and a heavier flywheel will solve that problem. A WR is hard to beat in the woods. A lot of guys race YZs in the woods too but with e-start, a kickstand and wide ratio tranny combined with the softer suspension really makes it fun to ride. You can strip it down and put YZ plastics on it plus other little tricks here and there such as lighter aftermarket parts but it's the nimbleness of the ride that makes it feel light. I think it would be cheaper to get a WR and make it lighter than it would to get a YZ and make it woods ready. Plus what ever you can get the best deal on is a big factor as well.

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Yes, a FWW and proper jetting makes the YZ250F a woods tractor. Mine lugs very very low without flame out. JD jetting and air screw setting. FWW keeps it chugging too. Makes it easier to bump start too. Kickstarting a properly jetted bike is easy.

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http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=959364&page=4&highlight=electric+start+2010+yz250f

Check this thread out as a idea. The one real down side about the YZF that I found was that it is a bottom end only motor and doesnt rev out very far. You do alot more shifting then lets say a Kawi. They are super relabile though and work quiet well. I really enjoyed mine but I was just to heavy.

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the YZ250f is an awesome woods bike when set up correctly. Mine has athena big bore, wr gears (3rd, 4th, and 5th), rekluse exp, promoto kickstand, mylar's radiators, and the usual armor. Yamaha motors are very relaible too, short of a flat tire mine has never let me down during a race.

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I just traded my 2008 WR250F in on a new 2011 YZ250F because of the weight factor (the WR250F is 30 pounds more in weight). I did not care for the extra weight of the WR250F for tight riding conditions. The e start is not worth the weight to me and I just don't stall the bike enough to need it. Go sit on a new WR250F and then sit on a new YZ250F and the weight difference is shocking.

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Only thing i have on my 250f is a skid plate and radiator and handguards. Its been in the woods 80 percent of the time since it was new, I used stock gearing forever and just now went to 13/50 and its a much happier bike in the woods with that setup. As far as E start I have never felt it was needed my bike starts 1-2 kick hot all the time infact I make my buddy with a crf250x mad because my bike starts faster than his e start bike after laying it down.

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I bought a yz250f brand new in 2007 and use it about 90% of the time in the woods. I have never had any issues with the bike choking out in the woods. After some slight suspension adjustments and a front sproket sized 1 tooth smaller the bike handles the woods very well. The sproket change gave me added low end torque to lift the front wheel over any obsticle (not real worried about top end when riding through 30'' wide trails). I love riding my yz, especially compared to my fathers 04 WR. But the WR is def a nice trail bike.

As far as the E Start goes, I don't need it at all. Was at Durhamtown Plantation in Ga. last week, and even in 40 degree weather the bike would start in about 2-3 kicks first thing in the morning! Once it's warmed up 1 kick is all you need. So much easier to start than my little brother's CRF250. Your son is young, he can handle the kickstart.

I'd go with the YZ.

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I bought a yz250f brand new in 2007 and use it about 90% of the time in the woods. I have never had any issues with the bike choking out in the woods. After some slight suspension adjustments and a front sproket sized 1 tooth smaller the bike handles the woods very well. The sproket change gave me added low end torque to lift the front wheel over any obsticle (not real worried about top end when riding through 30'' wide trails). I love riding my yz, especially compared to my fathers 04 WR. But the WR is def a nice trail bike.

As far as the E Start goes, I don't need it at all. Was at Durhamtown Plantation in Ga. last week, and even in 40 degree weather the bike would start in about 2-3 kicks first thing in the morning! Once it's warmed up 1 kick is all you need. So much easier to start than my little brother's CRF250. Your son is young, he can handle the kickstart.

I'd go with the YZ.

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Good feedback guys . . . I did sit on a newer YZ250F and a WR250 and, yes, lighter feeling. I also compared the weights on yamaha-motor website and there's an appreciable weight difference.

I'm sure the question has been asked concerning what year is better so I won't ask it directly, but are there any years that I should stay away from?

My understanding is that the Yamahas are noted for their reliability, that's important to dad!

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Just be aware, these are "high strung" race bikes, and care and attention to details is what makes these bikes run well. The drill is to change the oil often, every 5-8 hours, and keep the air filter clean and sealed up. Get an hour meter, the best $35 you will spend.

They hold minimal qtys of oil, so it breaks down quickly. Dirt wears the coating on the valves. I've had great luck stacking filters. I use a TwinAir with another single element filter on top of that. Make sure there is no dust in the rubber boot when you clean the filter, make sure the boot is attached to the carb securely, and change the oil filter at least every other oil change. I change mine at every oil change. Oil and filters are cheap compared to the resulting damages. Good luck.

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Well if you ride with younger riders and constantly have to stop, get off, help the lil' guy, get back on, start up, ride 10 yards and repeat then a kickstand and e-start is a blessing.

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The last two comments are very true. A YZ and a WR are both race bikes and have high general maintenance (oil, filters, etc.). If you want a low speed trail bike, you may be better off with the TT.

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The last two comments are very true. A YZ and a WR are both race bikes and have high general maintenance (oil, filters, etc.). If you want a low speed trail bike, you may be better off with the TT.

Or not. These high technology super strung out race bikes are quite managable maintenance wise when trail ridden only. You must remember that these are Yamahas. They DID factor longevity into its design unlike other OEMs.

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Or not. These high technology super strung out race bikes are quite managable maintenance wise when trail ridden only. You must remember that these are Yamahas. They DID factor longevity into its design unlike other OEMs.
But they still are high maintenance, just not that hard of maintenance. If you ride every week or even several time a week you are going to be spending a few hours on it. Cleaning, oil changes, filter changes, other little things you need to mess with. But the positive is that this routine maintenance keeps them purring.:busted:

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