Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

2012 ktm 250xc

Recommended Posts

Anyone riding a 2012 250XC having issues with the bike not wanting to turn?? I'm hearing from several sources that they have tried the XC and experienced the same thing. I've also heard that Factory Connection has tried longer shock shafts etc. I'm having a difficult time getting mine to turn in the tight trees. The front end is not very well planted either. It want's to push badly and it just wonders all over the place. I've slid the forks up in the clamps to the second line, set the sag to 100mm. I'm borderline spring rate on the rear. 100mm rider sag gives me about 25mm free sag. Any suggestions are welcome.

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a 2009 250 XC and this is the ONLY issue I have with the bike. The front end never feels planted and often feels like it is on the verge of washing out. I had the front (and rear) suspension done. Not sure what the problem is... (probably me :busted:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2007 and earlier frames are my favorite because they turn so well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tighten up the compression on the fork! That will help it turn!

Right now, per Factory Connection recommendations, I have the front fork compression set 18 clicks out (from full hard). KTM standard setting is 15. For reference, max out is 36 clicks.

So are you saying I should set it at FEWER clicks out (something like 12-15)? Or even fewer than that?

Also, I have the fork tube height set at 2 mm (again per FC recommendation); I may raise them another 2 mm in the triple clamps, and see how that feels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Right now, per Factory Connection recommendations, I have the front fork compression set 18 clicks out (from full hard). KTM standard setting is 15. For reference, max out is 36 clicks.

So are you saying I should set it at FEWER clicks out (something like 12-15)? Or even fewer than that?

Also, I have the fork tube height set at 2 mm (again per FC recommendation); I may raise them another 2 mm in the triple clamps, and see how that feels.

on my 2011 300xc I found the clickers make a big difference on how well it turned. When I turned the clickers out( less compression) it didn't turn nearly as well as when they were turned in (more compression damping)

Turn the compression 5 out from full hard and see how it turns. Then keep backing them out until you get a good balance between comfort and cornering. I found when my forks felt harsh I just needed to ride faster! Ha Ha!

I put a scotts damper on my bike and it was the single biggest improvement to the front suspension! It settled the front end down and made it more rideable!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
on my 2011 300xc I found the clickers make a big difference on how well it turned. When I turned the clickers out( less compression) it didn't turn nearly as well as when they were turned in (more compression damping)

Turn the compression 5 out from full hard and see how it turns. Then keep backing them out until you get a good balance between comfort and cornering. I found when my forks felt harsh I just needed to ride faster! Ha Ha!

I put a scotts damper on my bike and it was the single biggest improvement to the front suspension! It settled the front end down and made it more rideable!

Thanks - I will definitely give that a try :busted:.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found on my 12 300XC that I have to be aggressive and it will turn.. But I agree the short steering stops suck. I plan on removing the jamnut and using washers to gain some turning radius. i have already taken a few off trail excursions because of the steering stops..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 2012 KTM 250xc. I did a revalve before I rode it, ditched the MX 51 front (useless tire). Im 205, expert rider and from my experience to date, sag is critical with KTMs. I had the same issues with my 08 and both 09s. As for my 2012, I started with 100mm after my revalve, 3 hrs later I adjusted for 98mm, Ive been running 98mm for the last 2 1/2hrs with great results (I put the X-trig adjuster on, OMG!!! Where has it been my whole life). I run my forks on the first line and have my rear wheel slide back about 1/2 of the way in the adjusters. After Hr 3 I also installed a GPR steering damper (on number 2 setting) and added a click to the front suspension (im 17 clicks out from all the way in). The steering damper helps with the nervousness of the KTM chassis. In all my KTMs I found the frames are a real aggressive geometry. As for the steering stops, I leave it stock. I very rarely hit them but it has happened. In those cases its aggresive throttle control or a foot plant. I also run my bars in the upper triple clamp holes, stock bar width. Im quite impressed with these new KTMs and feel they are a hands down improvement over the earlier models I had. I will keep you updated when I adjust for 96mm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a 2012 KTM 250xc. I did a revalve before I rode it, ditched the MX 51 front (useless tire). Im 205, expert rider and from my experience to date, sag is critical with KTMs. I had the same issues with my 08 and both 09s. As for my 2012, I started with 100mm after my revalve, 3 hrs later I adjusted for 98mm, Ive been running 98mm for the last 2 1/2hrs with great results (I put the X-trig adjuster on, OMG!!! Where has it been my whole life). I run my forks on the first line and have my rear wheel slide back about 1/2 of the way in the adjusters. After Hr 3 I also installed a GPR steering damper (on number 2 setting) and added a click to the front suspension (im 17 clicks out from all the way in). The steering damper helps with the nervousness of the KTM chassis. In all my KTMs I found the frames are a real aggressive geometry. As for the steering stops, I leave it stock. I very rarely hit them but it has happened. In those cases its aggresive throttle control or a foot plant. I also run my bars in the upper triple clamp holes, stock bar width. Im quite impressed with these new KTMs and feel they are a hands down improvement over the earlier models I had. I will keep you updated when I adjust for 96mm.

Excellent information - thank you very much for sharing!

When I get home, I'll double check the rear SAG, but IIRC, Factory Connection recommended 120 mm, which did seem like quite a bit (though the rear is a FC progressive rate spring). I'll need to do some experimenting, but good to know it can be sorted out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Excellent information - thank you very much for sharing!

When I get home, I'll double check the rear SAG, but IIRC, Factory Connection recommended 120 mm, which did seem like quite a bit (though the rear is a FC progressive rate spring). I'll need to do some experimenting, but good to know it can be sorted out.

Why a progressive spring and 120mm? Im not a suspension expert, but from what my suspension tuner said, im sure that you should be running a straight rate spring. The progressive springs are for the non-linkage KTMs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The '09 250 XC is a PDS / non-linkage system; according to Racetech and FC, the progressive spring is the way to go.

http://www.racetech.com/articles/ktm.htm

I like it, but am absolutely no expert when it comes to suspension. I think a reduction in SAG and a few other adjustments might be an improvement. Test and tune, test and tune...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The '09 250 XC is a PDS / non-linkage system; according to Racetech and FC, the progressive spring is the way to go.

http://www.racetech.com/articles/ktm.htm

I like it, but am absolutely no expert when it comes to suspension. I think a reduction in SAG and a few other adjustments might be an improvement. Test and tune, test and tune...

Ahhh, sorry two different bikes. As for your 09, yes 120mm is alot if sag. I ran my 09s between 105-107mm depending on the course, had my rear wheel slid about 3/4 of the way on the adjusters, still ran my forks on the first line and a steering damper on both of them. I found no matter which year of KTM, the steering damper has to be the second biggest improvement after suspension. I also ran my chain pretty slack with about 3 fingers from bottom of chain to slider. I also was running maxxis ITs, which had a stiffer side wall and were wider, I didnt like them though but they wore like iron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ahhh, sorry two different bikes. As for your 09, yes 120mm is alot if sag. I ran my 09s between 105-107mm depending on the course, had my rear wheel slid about 3/4 of the way on the adjusters, still ran my forks on the first line and a steering damper on both of them. I found no matter which year of KTM, the steering damper has to be the second biggest improvement after suspension. I also ran my chain pretty slack with about 3 fingers from bottom of chain to slider. I also was running maxxis ITs, which had a stiffer side wall and were wider, I didnt like them though but they wore like iron.

No worries :busted:. What types / aspects of riding did the steering damper help to improve the most? I haven't really noticed any head shake, but I don't do a lot of WOT high speed riding.

I see someone also mentioned changing the front tire. After 2.5 years on the OEM front, maybe it's time...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No worries :busted:. What types / aspects of riding did the steering damper help to improve the most? I haven't really noticed any head shake, but I don't do a lot of WOT high speed riding.

I see someone also mentioned changing the front tire. After 2.5 years on the OEM front, maybe it's time...

Not so much headshake, but it slows down the aggressive steering nature of the KTMs. In my experience, the KTM is quick to turn in causing you turn before you hit the rut (were talking a fraction of a second). So intead of railing the rut, your falling into it, then accelerating. The other aspect I love about the damper is deflection, the KTMs are stiff bikes (maybe due to tighter tolerances?). When I hit small trail junk, the KTMs sans my '12 all want to deflect slightly, the dampers help emmensly in this area.

And yes, 2 1/2 years on the tire, that could be a huge problem. Rounded knobs combined with a broken down sidewall would have a major effect on handling!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! Now I just need to keep myself from doing EVERYTHING at once, so I can truly evaluate what worked and what didn't :busted:.

I was on the fence about new tires this winter - now I'm definitely picking a set up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks! Now I just need to keep myself from doing EVERYTHING at once, so I can truly evaluate what worked and what didn't :busted:.

I was on the fence about new tires this winter - now I'm definitely picking a set up!

IMO, get the new tires first, then play with your suspension. After you get the suspension to where you like, add the steering damper. Its like a icing on the cake. I went through a 08 and 2 09s and now my '12 KTM so I had a few to learn from and test with but this '12 has been a whole new area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly what I was thinking. I know this is a topic for another thread (and there are plenty of them - I searched), but what tires do you recommend?

I ride mostly mx on a track that is loose dirt (sort of loamy) with a decent amount of small rocks. The other track I ride is a mix of hard packed dirt and loose dirt, also with small rocks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Exactly what I was thinking. I know this is a topic for another thread (and there are plenty of them - I searched), but what tires do you recommend?

I ride mostly mx on a track that is loose dirt (sort of loamy) with a decent amount of small rocks. The other track I ride is a mix of hard packed dirt and loose dirt, also with small rocks.

lol, well I have to say Goldentyre for the reason that I get support from them but my back up option is the Dunlop MX 51 rear and MX 31 front. Its a solid tire combo. If I was paying out of my own pocket that Dunlop combo is what I would be running.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×