Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Sand track cornering

Recommended Posts

Hey, I am sure this has prolly been gone over a million times but... in a sandy loam corner do you guys stay the line? What I mean is do you ride through the turn front and back tire and make a deep, single rut? Or do you start coming in about 10 inches with the front tire and let the rear tire drift into the rut... or where ever it goes? I think i am looking at the corner too much when my front and rear wheel are in the rut and I am looking out of the corner when I shorten the corner a bit with the front and slide into the rut. Im sorry if I didn't explain that right... you all prolly understand what I mean though. Thanks for any input! :busted:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you talking a bermed corner ??, a flat corner ??, a uphill corner ??, is it tight or sweeping ?? , as the way the corner is will depend on how you can go thru it , especially in sand , and was the corner/s wet or dry as that makes a big difference as well , wet sand will hold a rut and your bike better than dry , that will blow out and make you push , so all this makes a difference

Some corners i dont get in the ruts because sometimes it slows me down , sometimes going into the rut then cutting out and across it part way thru works better , it is more actual corner dependent and rider dependent as riders attack corners differently though its the same corner

Need more specifics on the corner/s (at least i do)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flat approach, corner has made a berm you can stick in well, soil is dry but not like sugar sand. Sorry for lack of info, I just kind of blurted the question w/o thinkin it through. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to ride outside of everyone elses lines because if you commit yourself to only 1 line thru the corner (say a rut) then if someone crashes in front of you , you will struggle thru the corner , so i usually try a slightly different approach and follow thru/exit each lap , that way no matter what happens i know the fast and slow way around the turn

I tend to not use front brake in corners ,(its a old habit and i find i can still corner decent without it) and so i approach them a little differently than most i also usually stand if at all possible , i stand almost the entire track , i brake before the corner (rear brake only), and just power thru the corner ,, i try to keep both feet on the pegs , i rarely stick out my foot/leg , once in a while , but not generally , sometimes dragging my rear brake to hold me in the corner as i accelerate and usually only use ruts to guide the first part of my turn then i turn into the turn tighter , i am not real fast compared to some 20 year old kids , but watch this video (below), it shows what i am talking about , this track has some corners like you mentioned , i use the ruts to start my turn , but get out of it real quick usually (depending on the depth of the rut), the first lap i was seeing how the bike reacted as i had just changed suspension settings and was not concentrating on technique , more of seeing how the bike felt , the second lap in the video (it was actually the 4th lap) when the guy passes me is when i ride harder and you can see the lines i select in the corners , makes for a fast corner speed(usually) i mess up near the end in one corner because i was tired , at least for me its faster to ride corners this way , as i can change lines without thinking about it , comes in handy in traffic , i am older than you so i am most likely slower , but the kid i was trying to catch on the second lap , i am older than his father , if that matters any

http://vimeo.com/30722277

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey thanks for the info! Being that after I watched your video, I see that I have left ALOT of relative info out of my question. Track width, style, and bike is going to play a roll in getting to the answer of my question. I think I will haul my bike to work and go an get my buddy to video me on a section of his course. That would be prolly the best way you can see what I am talking about. Thanks, it may be a day or so. :busted:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hey, I am sure this has prolly been gone over a million times but... in a sandy loam corner do you guys stay the line? What I mean is do you ride through the turn front and back tire and make a deep, single rut? Or do you start coming in about 10 inches with the front tire and let the rear tire drift into the rut... or where ever it goes? I think i am looking at the corner too much when my front and rear wheel are in the rut and I am looking out of the corner when I shorten the corner a bit with the front and slide into the rut. Im sorry if I didn't explain that right... you all prolly understand what I mean though. Thanks for any input! :busted:

In soft sand you can't steer with just the front wheel. As you begin to steer with the front wheel you have to get on the throttle. That will take a lot of the demand off steering with the front wheel and you'll actually be steering with the front and rear wheels. Don't put any unnecessary weight on the front wheel either. You can still sit in the front part of the seat but don't have your body position too far forward. Keep the front end light. Many times it helps to lower your forks in the triple clamps which will raise the front end so it won't steel so quickly. Try it in 3mm increments.

Check out the free preview of my Sand and Grass Cornering Techniques DVD and/or order it online at; http://wp.gsmxs.com/motocross-sand-grass-techniques/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Gary! Im going to post a vid of the corners I'm talkin about, I'm trying to figure out which is best out of the two ways i'm doing these corners. I have a mostly sand HS coming up at the end of this month, need to win my class and i'm trying different stuff to see which is best. Thanks again for your reply!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Reply with:

Sign in to follow this  

×