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effectiveness of shock compression adjuster

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I'd like to hear what anyone has to say about their shocks compression adjuster (not so much the rebound, but just the low speed and high speed compression clickers).

For example, what is the usefull range of clicks for the low speed screw and what's the useful range of the high speed nut. Does anyone run the low speed screw in the 2 - 4 out range, and if so, how does that work. Or do you tend to run the screw out towards the end.

And what's the opinion of the effectiveness of the high speed nut.

thanks,

kevin

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low speed comp showa or kyb - small effects for big qty change.

Rebound major effect per click either brand in both comp and reb.

highspeed on kyb almost worthless.

highspeed on showa has good range.

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kyb high speed problem is the very stiff spring!!

low speed comp have a good effect , important when you go near all close (wrong)

hi speed on showa make a big difference , if you like the bike 2.5 out and try 1 out you can t ride , the bike beat so much on pegs. i think is more important a good hi speed settings then low speed if i must choise one of that.

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kyb high speed problem is the very stiff spring!!

low speed comp have a good effect , important when you go near all close (wrong)

hi speed on showa make a big difference , if you like the bike 2.5 out and try 1 out you can t ride , the bike beat so much on pegs. i think is more important a good hi speed settings then low speed if i must choise one of that.

The kyb problem is it's placement of preload...not necessarily the spring.

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Yeah, I just installed a set of FC light HS spring along with the associated HS plate or valve. It made the shock work more progressively and without the jarring, excellent. I like my shocks to operate in the middle of the range otherwise the valving is off with either extreme and should be altered. The reb adjuster has a much greater affect than the low speed.

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The kyb problem is it's placement of preload...not necessarily the spring.

What's the best way to change that? - have a lighter spring on the way.

Agree KYB has no sweet spot for HS.

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Sorry, but do any of you guys mind explaining what the high speed nut does? I ride HS and I'm always playing w/ my suspension. I always just turn the high speed nut 2.5 turns out and leave it, but I'm not sure what I', looking for and what its doing for my damping..

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This is regarding the shocks low speed and high speed compression adjusters.

The reason I started this post and asked this queston is that when out testing, some/most riders don't seem to notice any difference when making reasonable adjustments to either the shocks low speed or the high speed compression adjusters. Reasonable being +/- 5 to 6 clicks. They might notice if you compare full open to full close, but that's about it.

When you do a series of dyno tests to compare the click range of the shock compression adjusters, you can see the exact amount of change in force, and where the changes take place. Small changes to the clickers don't really make much of a change in force.

This fits in with another post I had about coming up with a general consensus on the number of shims that need to be changed for a rider to notice the difference. Once you decide on a number of shims, you can dyno test a shock, then remove that number of shims to see how much the force numbers changes. You can look at the percent of change.

For example, and I'll make up some numbers to illustrate.

Lets say the shock needs three face shims to be added or removed to be noticed. We would dyno the shock and record the numbers. Lets say the numbers are:

low speed = 106

mid speed = 639

high speed = 1224

Then we remove the 3 face shims and get:

low speed = 102

mid speed = 613

high speed = 1175

This would be about a 4% change.

So I ask myself, what does this have to do with the shock compression adjuster. Nothing. Well, actually it does. We could dyno test the shock and see how much the clickers affect the compression force. Then we could make a percent comparison and gain a new perspective into how small shim changes relate to compression clicker changes.

I'll make up some numbers. For example, lets say the shock compression clickers are set at lc-10 and hc-2. For comparison we'll just use the same numbers as above:

low speed = 106

mid speed = 639

high speed = 1224

Then we'll go stiffer by going to lc-2, hc-0 (full close). We might get something like this:

low speed = 109

mid speed = 656

high speed = 1246

This is about a 2 - 3 % change.

Thats it.

Edited by kevinstillwell

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did you say when i ride my bike 2 hc out and close all turn it s only 3% different and most rider feel a very hard difference ????mhhh that something wrong

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Sorry, but do any of you guys mind explaining what the high speed nut does? I ride HS and I'm always playing w/ my suspension. I always just turn the high speed nut 2.5 turns out and leave it, but I'm not sure what I', looking for and what its doing for my damping..

I could explain what a KYB HS adjuster does, for technical reasons. now that your name makes me think you have a showa shock and its been said that on showa shocks the HS adjustment works different, I don't know if it makes sense...

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I'll make up some numbers. For example, lets say the shock compression clickers are set at lc 10 and hc 2. For comparison we'll just use the same numbers as above:

low speed = 106

mid speed = 639

high speed = 1224

Then we'll go stiffer by turning the low speed to 2 out, and the high speed nut we'll turn all the way in (closed). We might get something like this:

low speed = 109

mid speed = 656

high speed = 1246

This is about a 2 - 3 % change.

Thats it.

I can stop a shock from bottoming on a seat bounce with a 1/2 turn in on HS if the main stack is close. Can also feel the difference LS 5 out vs 12 out.

So i find it hard to believe its only a 2-3% change? My testing tells me at least 10 to 15% depending on the brand of shock. The Showa adjuster having the best range.

When I tested a softer FC adjuster spring, it felt like I went 2 sizes smaller on the clamp shim on the main stack, the shock really went soft. It had me thinking? If you have a shock thats beating you up, put in a FC adjuster spring if your not into re-valving.

Edited by 455

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this was a good thread also kevin!! did you come up with more numbers?

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I have so many numbers by head spins. I might put some up later, once I have it figured out how to group and identify the forks and shocks. See thread titled "How to group forks and shocks ?"

Edited by kevinstillwell

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455 stated, "I can stop a shock from bottoming on a seat bounce with a 1/2 turn in on HS if the main stack is close..."

That is typically how I adjust my HS (KYB) clickers. Coming out on the HS until I bottom on a seat bounce, then turn back in.

I DON'T GET IT THOUGH!!!

I don't see how going up the face of a jump is high shaft speed?

Can someone clarify this concept please?

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On lading the bike comes down but the track is fiat or downhill, on a jump face, the bike goes into the face as the face ramp increases in steepness, so you can expect the shaft speed to be twice as fast

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Mog,

I can understand that. The bike is going into the face. Therefore, it's accelerated shaft speed.

I always thought of sharp edge, eaten up track, accelerating bumps as High Speed hits.

Thanks,

Gerry K.

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on a jump face, the bike goes into the face as the face ramp increases in steepness, so you can expect the shaft speed to be twice as fast

Sorry, it doesn't work that way. Shaft speeds into the face of jumps are relatively slow. We need to hear from someone who has measured the shaft velocities when seat-bouncing.

Edited by kevinstillwell

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Sounds like once the low speed orifice reaches max flow (hydro locks) the high speed circuit opens and begins to flow. I too control seat hop bottoming with the HS adjuster.Works quite well.

Perhaps a jump face is "mid speed" :thumbsup:

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