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What is a decent but cost conscious, micrometer and telescoping gauge manufacturer?

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I am looking to measure the cylinders on my bikes. I don’t think I need to spend big bucks, and I know you get what you pay for, but I would like to get good readings for my engine cylinders. Any Ideas? I am certain that a machinist would point to the high dollar brands but is this really necessary for the occasional measurement?

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I'm partial to my Starrett micrometers & telescoping gages. But I'm a machinist, & use them daily...... :busted:

That said, you could probably get an "*OK/accurate enough*" measurement with something from, say, Enco...... then have a machinist buddy double check it for ya.....

Jimmie

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I use cheap digital calipers for most things (and they are surprisingly accurate when checked against my certified Starretts) but when you need real precision such as cylinder bores you will never regret the purchase of Starrett micrometers. My preference, and the cheapest, is outside mics and telescoping gauges.

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Starrett is the best. I inherited a full set of antique micrometers from my grandfather and they still work like new. I also bought a Starrett Dial Caliper at a pawn shop for $20. I use it at least a few times a week and would be at a loss without it.

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I don't have much experience with them personally, but I know that Fowler and Spi used to be two of the higher quality imports.

They are definitely not the quality of a Starrett, Mitutoyo, or Brown & Sharpe, but they are also not the price.

Personally, I think the quality of the big 3 has been dropping over the last 10 years or so :busted:

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I am looking to measure the cylinders on my bikes. I don’t think I need to spend big bucks, and I know you get what you pay for, but I would like to get good readings for my engine cylinders. Any Ideas? I am certain that a machinist would point to the high dollar brands but is this really necessary for the occasional measurement?[/quote

Snap on inside Micrometer

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I used to be a machinist, we tested several mics years ago, the Chinese and Polish mics are generally only off .0001-.0002 over the entire scale (with standards), Mitutoyo and Starrets seem to be .0001, the only brand we found that was dead on was Etalon.

Any of these mics are more accurate than the telescoping gauges, which require a lot of feel to get an accurate reading. I would recommend getting a decent quality mic in the size(s) you need, and an inexpensive dial bore gauge (I think I paid around $99 for mine). The dial bore gauge will be easier to get an accurate reading than the telescoping gauge.

http://www.sjdiscounttools.com/fow72-646-400.html

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Similar to the OP here. Trying to increase my shop abilities and quality of maintenance. Got good quality micrometers (Starrett, B&S) from the stash of a retired machinist, but need something to check cylinder bores for wear and out of round (some vintage bikes w/sleeves, some newer w/plated). Not exactly NASA here and don't have a boatload to spend for something I'd use 2-4x per year...but don't want junk.

At a professional tool store nearby, found a MEDA 5675010 dial bore gauge for $75 which has accuracy to 0.01mm. Shop manuals indicate bore/etc measurements to 0.001mm (e.g. 67.400-67.415mm). It appears this gauge isn't accurate enough.

Read a bit and looked at HF snap/telescoping gauges that were, unfortunately, very poor quality (very gritty, locks didn't work).

At the same tool place, Starrett inside mics go for ~$175 (found one on CL for $100), ~$400 for a dial bore gauge with 0.001mm accuracy.

The $75 bore gauge accurate/good enough? Inside mics instead?

Thoughts appreciated...thx!

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Starrett,Browne & Sharpe,Mitutoyo are all good stuff. For measuring cylinders I prefer a bore gage over snap gage and micrometer. BTW redlined if a tool is off by .0001" or .0002" across the range it needs to be cleaned and adjusted then it will be dead nutz.

Pick up what ya can online via CL or eBay. For infrequent home use anything made in USA or Japan will do a great job. As far as cost what does a new engine cost if you screw the measurement up by using substandard tools? For engine work you need good,accurate repeatable tools and to measure in thousandths it won't come cheap. If inaccurate it will be far from occasional. Some things are just worth doing right or paying someone to do it for you.

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Appreciate the input, T.Rex. From what I've read, an inside mic appears to be accurate for bore measurement, just not as easy to use as a bore gauge.

Not trying to totally cheap out - I like to purchase good quality and it's apparent the cheap bore gauge and snap gauges aren't the ticket - but would a quality (Starrett) inside mic do the trick as well as a decent bore gauge?

$200 difference...

Thx again!

Chuck

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Yeah inside mics are good but require some experience and feel to use well as they only use 2 points. A good bore gage uses the 2 measuring points and 2 additional that stabilize and center the gage in the bore. That's the biggest advantage of a bore gage,easy repeatability. No matter what you use always verify the tool with an accurate micrometer. I keep one away from others just for that purpose.

Whatever you use take care of it,keep it clean,lubed,adjusted and never lend it out. If a friend wants to use it do it for them. Keeps friends your friends.

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