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how to take rust off a chain?

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I brought home my first streetbike yesterday, a 1982 GPz 750 (been riding street and dirt for awhile, but this is the first streetbike that is MINE) and the chain has some surface rust on it. It is an almost new O-ring chain with a bit of surface rust due to sitting for 4 years, what is the best way to clean it off without damaging the o-rings?

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personally i wouldnt want to put any type of penetrating lubricant or solvent on the chain, because it may "creep" past the seals and dissolve the grease thats sealed inside the o-rings.

I dont run O-ring chains so keep in mind that its just speculation, but it makes sense to me.

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Maybe some fine sand paper? I love those GPzs, I may buy an 1100 off of my dad next summer. Is yours a turbo?

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Submerge it in kerosene for about an hour, remove from kero and steel brush it to remove the rust. If it's just superficial surface rust, I wouldn't worry about it. If you are concerned with damaging the orings, then just buy a new chain.

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Exactly. If its superficial, a quick clean up and you're good to go. If its more then that, ditch the chain, its garbage, and buy a new one.

And I wouldn't use any sandpaper or steel brushes, or anything that would scratch the metal, right off the bat.

It will surely remove the rust, but it will also scratch the hell out of the chain leading to even more almost instant rust on it as soon as you are done with it. Not to mention you risk damaging the o-rings.

Try soaking in kero or something similar first as suggested, then brushing with a nylon brush or similar if the rust is still there.

You maybe surprised how much of the rust comes off just from that.

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personally i wouldnt want to put any type of penetrating lubricant or solvent on the chain, because it may "creep" past the seals and dissolve the grease thats sealed inside the o-rings.

I dont run O-ring chains so keep in mind that its just speculation, but it makes sense to me.

not ANOTHER "don't use wd40" thread.. holy cow :busted: Do a search, many use nothing but wd40. this is from someone that uses NOTHIN BUT wd40.. ever.. on o-ring chanins, on roadracing bikes (33 class championships) and outdoor harescrambles on dirt bikes (A-class)..

word to your mother. LOL (little Vanailla Ice lingo, have NO idea why i said that).

TO THE O.P.! Just spray that thing down, a good douche of WD40, and run the friggin thing. It will be fine. From THERE, considering you will not be spraying WD40 every ride (as i do on my race machines). you should soak it with oil per the manual.

Submerge it in kerosene for about an hour, remove from kero and steel brush it to remove the rust. If it's just superficial surface rust, I wouldn't worry about it. If you are concerned with damaging the orings, then just buy a new chain.

im with this guy, just get another chain. There are plenty of decent $50-75 alternatives. I would be careful with a steel brush on the o-rings. It can be done, just use it on the outside of the plates. No need to brush the rollers! they will get shiny from running on the sprockets soon enough.

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not ANOTHER "don't use wd40" thread.. holy cow :busted: Do a search, many use nothing but wd40. this is from someone that uses NOTHIN BUT wd40.. ever.. on o-ring chanins, on roadracing bikes (33 class championships) and outdoor harescrambles on dirt bikes (A-class)..

word to your mother. LOL (little Vanailla Ice lingo, have NO idea why i said that).

TO THE O.P.! Just spray that thing down, a good douche of WD40, and run the friggin thing. It will be fine. From THERE, considering you will not be spraying WD40 every ride (as i do on my race machines). you should soak it with oil per the manual.

im with this guy, just get another chain. There are plenty of decent $50-75 alternatives. I would be careful with a steel brush on the o-rings. It can be done, just use it on the outside of the plates. No need to brush the rollers! they will get shiny from running on the sprockets soon enough.

I said in the thread i dont use o-ring chains anyway. And i dont care who is running them, i STILL suggest that its a bad idea.

Theory of a O-ring chain is to SEAL in the grease. WD-40 etc is a PENETRATING SOLVENT. Solvent = dissolves grease. If the chain is brand new, and the o-rings are sealing perfectly, then sure i can see using wd-40. However this chain is obviously AGED, meaning the integrity of the o-rings is SUSPECT and therefor using a SOLVENT is a bad idea.

IF you dissolve all the grease from your o-ring chain, then why not just use a standard chain and save the weight and BS.

With all that said, in the end im in agreement with you, get a new one.

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I'd hose it down with WD-40, then wash it good with soapy water to get the majority of the rust off. You could also wipe it down good with a rag soaked in Kerosene, then wash it with soapy water.

Dry it, spray it with chain lube (I prefere Maxima Chain Wax), and ride it.:busted:

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The surface rust will not hurt anything just ride it.

Or

Put kerosene on a rag and wipe it down.

Or

I think I remember oven cleaner may work also. Just do not use anything that will damage the seals and the grease with in them. So put on the oven cleaner on a rag and only get the cleaner on the outside metal surface of the chain. NOT on the Orings! Rinse chain well and then dry and lube.

Or

If you have money to burn...Help our economy and buy a Diamond brand chain

Edited by SuzukiDRZ

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(The) Theory of a O-ring chain is to SEAL in the grease.

No it's not. Take a look at how an o-ring chain is constructed- there is an o-ring between the plates but nothing to keep dirt out or grease in from where the roller or inner plate rides on the pin. The o-ring is there to keep dirt from between the plates only. -Which is why so many people use light oil on o-ring chains with good results; the oil keeps the o-ring lubricated to repel dirt and penetrates under the roller to help lubricate the roller and plate on the pin.

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No it's not. Take a look at how an o-ring chain is constructed- there is an o-ring between the plates but nothing to keep dirt out or grease in from where the roller or inner plate rides on the pin. The o-ring is there to keep dirt from between the plates only. -Which is why so many people use light oil on o-ring chains with good results; the oil keeps the o-ring lubricated to repel dirt and penetrates under the roller to help lubricate the roller and plate on the pin.

makes sense, like i said i dont use em, i was misconstrued on the application of the rings.

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I have one of these

http://www.bustersdirtshop.com/product.php?productid=10388&cat=43&page=1

You could probably use some WD 40 and any nylon bristle brush to get most of it off.

I go totally brain dead and set the bike a stand and start it and kick it in gear and let it idle and hold a wire brush to the chain. Yes it is stupid and it could end bad but what the heck.

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The chain on my RMX had only 2 rides on it when the motor blew. The bike was parked outside for 5 years in the elements and the chain got pretty rusty. When I decided to bring the bike back from the dead I soaked the chain in ATF for a month and it came out looking brand new. Been running that same (NON o-ring)chain for a year and a half now with no problems

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RK CHAIN

Q How should I maintain my non-O-ring chain?

A Doing routine maintenance on any chain is a crucial step to getting the maximum wearlife out of your chain. You should clean and check its adjustment every 400 miles (sooner if the chain gets excessively dirty). Use Formulated o-ring chain cleaner or other similar product to keep dirt from building up around link plates and rollers. You can hose off a non-O-ring chain, but be sure to use a moisture displacement product (like WD40) after the chain comes in contact with water. After your chain has been cleaned you should apply a quality chain lube. Wipe away any excess lube, so that it does not attract dirt.

Q How should I maintain my O-ring chain?

A. Doing routine maintenance on any chain is a crucial step to getting the maximum wearlife out of your chain. You should clean and check its adjustment every 400 miles (sooner if the chain gets excessively dirty). Use formulated O-ring chain cleaner or other similar product to keep dirt from building up around link plates and rollers. Don’t use a wire brush or pressure washer. If your chain comes in contact with water, be sure to use a moisture displacement (like WD40). Lubing an O-Ring chain is vital for maximum wearlife. All RK O-Ring chains are injected at the factory with a lifetime supply of internal lubricant. The purpose of an O-Ring lube is to keep the chain from rusting and the O-rings from drying out. Use a lubricant specifically designed for O-Ring Chains.

Q. Will I need any special tools to install my new chain?

A. We recommend that every RK Chain be installed using a chain tool. Some tools, like RK’s UCT4060, combine all the parts needed to break the chain, cut it to length and clip or rivet the connecting link. Using tools that weren't designed for chain installation and/or removal may damage your chain and/or cause a dangerous situation.

Q. How much should I flare the rivet pin when installing a rivet connecting link?

A. The flare can be as little as 0.152mm to 0.5mm but should never be over 0.7mm. The rivet pin should be flared just enough to keep the sideplate on, but not flared too much to bind the link. When using the RK Chain Press-Fit/Rivet Tool you should be able to feel when you've reached the right flare. Below are examples of a good rivet link installation and an example of a bad rivet installation.

Good Rivet Installation

Bad Rivet Installation

Good even flare. Note the cracked side and the overly flared "mushroom" edge.

Good Rivet Installation

Bad Rivet Installation

Q. Can I use a connecting link from a different type of chain?

A. No, you should only use the connecting link for your specific chain. If you have lost your connecting link please contact your dealer for a correct replacement.

Q. Is it OK to add links to a chain if it’s too short?

A. RK does not recommend adding links to a chain if the chain is too short. You should purchase the correct length instead.

Q. Does RK or Excel sponsor riders?

A. Yes, Both RK and Excel sponsor riders of all levels. Most riders submit their resumes in September/October. RK Excel's sponsorship window will open in October and close in December. You must submit your resume during those times if you want to be considered for sponsorship. You can also send your resume through MXSponsor.com

Q. Where can I purchase half-links?

A. RK stopped producing half-links 15 years ago. To our knowledge half-links are not produced by any aftermarket motorcycle chain company. Home improvement stores have been reported as selling half-links but please DO NOT USE on motorcycle chains! The material and tensile strength rating of the half-link and the material/tensile strength rating of the chain do not match. Using a half-link can cause a very dangerous situation and is NOT recommended by RK Chain under ANY circumstances!

Q. Is it normal for a new chain to stretch after the first few rides?

A. Yes, it is normal for all chains to stretch a small amount. You should adjust your chain alignment and tension to OEM specs for your motorcycle/ATV. Check again after the first 50 miles and again after 200 miles. If you are riding off-road, check the chain before every ride.

Q. How do I know when my chain has elongated beyond its service life?

A. Besides the obvious signs of long-term wear, rust, "hooked" sprocket teeth and bound links; There is a mathematical formula for determining when the chain needs to be replaced. Below is an example using a 120 link, 520 pitch chain.

A= # of Links (We'll use 120 for an example)

B= .625 for 520 pitch chain. (Measurement of center of pin to center of pin)

C=.03 (ratio of wear)

(A x :busted:=Y

(Y x C)=Z

(Y + Z)=X

X=When the chain exceeds this length - replace the chain!

Example:

(120 x .625)=75

(75 x .03)=2.25

(75 + 2.25)=77.25"

You should replace this chain when its length exceeds 77.25".

Q. What does RK stand for?

A. RK is an abbreviation of Rolle Kette. Which is German for Roller Chain.

Q. How can I get a copy of the RK or Excel logo to get some graphics made?

A. Please download the Logo Use Permission Form and return it to us. We will respond within five business days. Click here to download the form.

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