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Searching for a certain dirt bike rack...

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I remember seeing an ad online a few years ago for a dirt bike rack system that mounts on the floor of a van, pickup truck or trailer. This particular design had a pair of fishhook shaped metal clamps that locked down over the footpegs of the bike when a pedal was depressed. I've searched and searched and can't locate any websites that have it advertised. Does anyone remember the name of a dirt bike rack/holder device like I have described above? It was really cool and it would probably have helped my search efforts if I could have actually remembered the name of the thing! :busted: I do remember their website having a video that demonstrated how it worked. Seems like all you would need is a wheel chock in addition to their dirt bike rack/holder. No tie-downs were required which is what made it so neat. I remember them saying that you could adjust it for various footpeg heights, etc. Any help on locating this device would be appreciated.

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The two that you guys posted links to are even better than the one I saw a while back! Thanks a lot. I think it would be really nice to have one of these type systems mounted on my trailer floor.

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What's wrong with tie downs?

What's wrong with the desire to use a system that is faster, easier, more secure, eliminates the need for a fork support and undesirable pressure on fork seals?

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What's wrong with the desire to use a system that is faster, easier, more secure, eliminates the need for a fork support and undesirable pressure on fork seals?

Tying your bike down won't cause your fork seals to fail.

The pressure in the forks is exponentially higher when you actually ride the bike than when it's tied down.

The camlock system puts pressure on your suspension also.

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Tying your bike down won't cause your fork seals to fail.

The pressure in the forks is exponentially higher when you actually ride the bike than when it's tied down.

The camlock system puts pressure on your suspension also.

I realize that the camlock system also requires some pressure as well. Agreed on that aspect of it. But why do so many people make references to fork seals being damaged during transportation if a fork support isn't used with tie-downs? Not trying to argue the point with you, I am trying to learn more about the situation because I find it to be an interesting topic. The products in the videos still seem like a really neat way to transport a bike to me.

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I realize that the camlock system also requires some pressure as well. Agreed on that aspect of it. But why do so many people make references to fork seals being damaged during transportation if a fork support isn't used with tie-downs? Not trying to argue the point with you, I am trying to learn more about the situation because I find it to be an interesting topic. The products in the videos still seem like a really neat way to transport a bike to me.

I think because that's what they've been told by their friends cousins brothers roommate.

And of course the companies that sell fork braces and other tie down methods.:busted:

I've toted bikes tens of thousands of miles tied down tightly the old fashioned way (hook the bars, snub up against something solid and tighten) and haven't had a fork seal fail because of that. I've had several fail due to degradation of the sealing material, worn fork bushings, damage (tears) to the sealing material from foreign substances getting in there, and seals shredded by damaged fork tubes.

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I keep my bike tied down 24/7 and haven't had my fork seals leak yet! I think that DIRT ind lack of maintenance would be the #1 culprit of failures for most parts on a dirtbike. If the "pressure" from using tie-downs blows your seals, why don't they blow EVERYTINE that you land a jump, or "bottom" your forks out?

As far as tying the bikes down be their pegs...use a couple turnbuckles and D-Rings to do what you want...it's cheaper that what those "machined" units are and does the same thing.

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I keep my bike tied down 24/7 and haven't had my fork seals leak yet! I think that DIRT ind lack of maintenance would be the #1 culprit of failures for most parts on a dirtbike. If the "pressure" from using tie-downs blows your seals, why don't they blow EVERYTINE that you land a jump, or "bottom" your forks out?

As far as tying the bikes down be their pegs...use a couple turnbuckles and D-Rings to do what you want...it's cheaper that what those "machined" units are and does the same thing.

My own personal opinion has always been that fork seals would have to be subjected to much higher amounts of stress and strain during riding than during transportation. I would think that by the forks rapidly going from being extended in mid-air to becoming compressed during the landing off a big jump, the seals themselves would undergo the most tension and compression during this type of repeated cycling of their material. What you're saying does make sense to me and seems very logical. I always clean my fork components very thoroughly after riding and I think that this has really helped prevent me from having fork seal issues over the years. A fork support does seem to help prevent the front end from bouncing too much over rough roads and causing a tie-down to come unhooked. I'm sure that I could fabricate something similar to one of those machined units for a lot less money. Good discussion guys! :busted:

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A fork support does seem to help prevent the front end from bouncing too much over rough roads and causing a tie-down to come unhooked.

I will admit, I started using a fork support for this reason about two years ago, not for the fork seal protection.

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I will admit, I started using a fork support for this reason about two years ago, not for the fork seal protection.

Soft - ties on the bike and a carabiner on the truck...never will come undone... and I have hit some dips and witnessed my rear tire catch air through rear-view mirror.

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Soft - ties on the bike and a carabiner on the truck...never will come undone... and I have hit some dips and witnessed my rear tire catch air through rear-view mirror.

I do that inside my trailer, that's when I really went to using a fork brace...one of those things where you can't just look in the rear view and see everything's OK.

If it's picking up your rear tire over bumps, try moving your tiedown points lower and more in line with the forks. This will put downforce on the whole bike, and less of a pulling forward force (which can cause your rear tire to become unloaded).

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If it's picking up your rear tire over bumps, try moving your tiedown points lower and more in line with the forks. This will put downforce on the whole bike, and less of a pulling forward force (which can cause your rear tire to become unloaded).

when i haul solo, usually run soft-ties between the triples so it holds it in place with less downward pulling and center bike in the back of the truck. But hard to that with 3 bikes in the back. The side of bike closest to side will not have enough leverage to hold bike.

The dips I have hit are on Cayuse pass between Hwy 410 and White Pass...very bad road to haul on. Now I know where the dips are.

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I have the moto cinch system in my truck, it works great. way faster and easier then messing with tie downs and honestly i think its more secure as well. tie downs work but they they are a hastle to store and take way longer to tie the bike in compared to the moto cinch.

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I have the moto cinch system in my truck, it works great. way faster and easier then messing with tie downs and honestly i think its more secure as well. tie downs work but they they are a hastle to store and take way longer to tie the bike in compared to the moto cinch.

How are they to remove? Do the bases get in the way of using your truck to haul other things, like lumber?

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A fork support does seem to help prevent the front end from bouncing too much over rough roads and causing a tie-down to come unhooked.

A buddy told me he uses bungee cords on each tie down from hook to hook to keep tension on the straps so they don't come loose and fall off. That was one of those "why didn't I think of that" moments.

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