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Starting In cold weather

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Hey guys, I have a 06 CRF450r that usually starts on the first or second kick. I like to ride in the mornings but it is below fifty and I have to kick the thing for half our or better to get it started. Any tips that anyone could share to help start this thing quicker would be appreciated. Many thanks and good riding my TT friends!

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Give it about 5 or 6 twists of the throttle to prime it with gas. Turn the choke on and give it a couple of kicks without touching the gas again. If it starts and then dies after a few seconds give it 2 more twists of the throttle and repeat.

When it gets colder it takes more fuel to get the bike running. Also if its a lot colder you may need to look at going a size bigger on your pilot and main jet. Colder air requires more fuel.

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Twist the throttle about 3 times,usually this squirts enough raw fuel into assist starting in cold weather,when the machine is cold.

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Colder weather requires more fuel , you will need to do as stated and prime it , or jet richer on the pilot or turn OUT your fuel screw !

Jetted properly , it will start easily , mine takes 1/4 - 1/2 turn out on the fuel screw from 100 degrees to 45 degrees

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It does take more fuel when cold. When I had my 06 I would do 2 twists then kick it twice, then 1 twist, kick twice and keep going 1 twist every two kicks, never had to kick more than prob 10 times to get it going. Some of my friends on older 4 strokes would bring a propane torch and heat the cylinder/head on real cold days which seemed to really help on a bike that wouldn't start.

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I have a ‘06 CRF450r as well and ran into the same issue. It seemed to be expedientially harder to start when cold and seemed to get progressively more difficult over time, although it started okay when it was nice and warm out. Because it was so gradual it was less noticeable and I would just fight with it a little more each time, but would eventually get it fired and forget about it until the next time. Towards the end, I found myself sticking a space heater next to it for about thirty minutes in the garage and then starting it. I would let it warm up and hope it retained enough heat to still start when I got to the riding area. I used all the typical methods already listed (three twists of the throttle, ect.). I know it sounds cliché, but I ended up having to take it in to have the usual intake valves replaced as all Hondas seem to need eventually. Afterwards, it was much easier to start and would normally fire in three or four kicks with no problems, even when the temps were down in the thirties or forties. If you haven’t had your valves replaced/checked lately, I would consider it. This is just my two cents.

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My 05 was exactly the same way. Once warmed up it started 1st or 2nd kick no matter what the cold temps were. Only happened in the winter, summer no problems starting it when cold. Valves were in spec. As others have said try a few twists of the throttle when cold to prime the motor. Might need a richer pilot or a fuel screw adjustment to make it richer. On my YZ450F I run a one step richer pilot in the winter now and it runs good in the colder temps. Does it have allot of backfiring once its running? That could be an indication it is running lean.

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Minimal backfiring only when I let off the throttle at high rpm's. Thanks for everyone's feedback, I'm definitely going to try all the above.

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