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Not a DRZ question. Apologies. Bent frame?

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This is not a DRZ question. I apologize for posting it here. But there is a lot of experience on this forum and I have learned quite a bit here which undoubtedly has something to do with my SM passing the 14,000 miles mark without a single problem.

I had my son’s 250 Ninja in the shop following a crash. Fork bent (both tubes) to the back and to the side. Shop writes up an estimate to replace fork, wheel, and minor stuff. All covered by insurance. Got the bike back after repair and the wheels are still grossly misaligned: front is off by 3” to the left.

Called the shop to discuss the problem. Service manager tells me to call the insurance and find out what they want to do. Bike is back in the shop and I am told they are waiting for specs from Kawasaki to evaluate the problem.

Questions:

• What is acceptable as far as wheel misalignment

• Does not the shop have a responsibility to complete the job once they undertake it

• Could it be a bent frame or steering column

• Course of action, ideas, suggestions

Thanks

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Questions:

• What is acceptable as far as wheel misalignment

• Does not the shop have a responsibility to complete the job once they undertake it

• Could it be a bent frame or steering column

• Course of action, ideas, suggestions

Thanks

  • Very little-- Not sure I've ever seen a published spec.
  • Yes
  • Yes to both
  • Shop needs to finish the job-- BUT, an option if your insurance will cover is to ahve a second shop inspect.

Crash bad enough on a little Ninja to bend both fork tubes like that.. frame, triple clamp, and other damage likely.

Call your insurance adjuster, tell them you are VERY concerned for your sons safety due to the issues with the repair, request to have the bike inspected by a different dealership.

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Can you further define the mis-alignment. When a front wheel gets against the fork stops hard enough to bend the fork tubes it will also bent the triple clamp. So when straight tubes are installed the wheel will be straight and the handle bars not straight ahead (or bars straight and wheel not). If that is all it is, it is pretty easily fixed with a new lower triple clamp. If the problem is more than that, some careful frame analysis is needed from a frame specialist. Cost could turn a repairable motorcycle into an insurance total.

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Thank you all for for your responses.

Can you further define the mis-alignment.

I ran a string along the wheels to evaluate the misalignment using the rear wheel as a reference. Here is what I got:

NinjaWheelAlignment.png

and it looks like this

IMG_9594-1.jpg

Thanks again

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Thank you all for for your responses.

I ran a string along the wheels to evaluate the misalignment using the rear wheel as a reference. Here is what I got:

NinjaWheelAlignment.png

and it looks like this

IMG_9594-1.jpg

Thanks again

oh wow. ya, that's totally not a fixed bike. unacceptable.

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Holly crap. And the shop tried to deliver the bike like that?

Needs to be looked at by a frame specialist. Who evaluated the original damage? And did the estimate for repair? Yea the insurance guy needs to get back in on this. Obviously the original evaluation was not comprehensive enough.

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waiting for specs ~ like that is going to in any kind of spec .Think you should show this to the insurance company that is definily not safe . my guess bent frame

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Who evaluated the original damage? And did the estimate for repair?

We took the bike in, described the crash, and how the front end looked bent. The shop then wrote a first estimate that included only cosmetic stuff: all the cowlings (it is a used bike with scratches all over), 2 mufflers (there is only 1 on a 250 Ninja), the radiator (no visible leak). But nothing on the front end.

So I called the shop and reiterated what I thought was the real damage (front end). The service manager said that they would look at it again. The shop issued an updted quote with all the cosmetic stuff of the first estimate plus: 2 inner fork tubes, 1 wheel, and the seals and oil to rebuild the fork (but no triples).

The cost ended up slightly above the book value of the bike. At this point it would have been a total loss. I wrote a fax to the insurance including the revised quote and outlined what the estimate contained:a lot of cosmetic stuff and the real damage. Also told them that I did not care about the cosmetic stuff but only wanted the bike to be made safe.

We agreed to meet at the shop: the shop guys (mechanic who did the estimate, service manager), insurance adjuster, my son and I. The adjuster saw the damage and worked with the shop service manager to clean all the cosmetic stuff off the quote as prior damage. In the process they added the upper and lower triples. The repair cost was now slightly below book value.

Funny thing is that I asked about possible damage to the frame and/or steering column and the "experts" said no. Only the fork. I also had asked the same question in the fax I sent to the insurance previously.

It took a call from the insurance to the shop for the shop to agree to look at the bike again. The bike has now been back in the shop for almost 3 weeks. Last week the shop gave me the line about waiting for alignment specs from Kawasaki. I will call the insurance and the shop again today or tomorrow. I am pondering my next move. Any suggestion?

I would hate to see the bike be declared a total loss after been "fixed". Which brings up the question (again): does not the shop have an obligation to fix the bike once they undertake the repair?

One more word. My sincere thanks to you guys for taking the time to help out, share experience, and offer advice.

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Which brings up the question (again): does not the shop have an obligation to fix the bike once they undertake the repair?

.

That is a question for a lawyer.. But my guess would be, they are obligated to fully repair what they placed the quote.

I've had insurance jobs on my own vehicles many times over the years, and not once was any of those jobs limited to just the items in the original insurance estimation.. there has been additional damage every single time.. Though never on a bike, always truck, car, trailer.

Insurance has always covered the additional repairs.

If the Est did not cover a required part to complete the repair, get with your insurance company.. let them deal with the shop.... again, speak to a lawyer.. sooner rather then later.. but I have always understood, the deal is with your insurance company, you entered in to a contract with them to facilitate the repair or replacement of the vehicle..

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Thank you all for for your responses.

I ran a string along the wheels to evaluate the misalignment using the rear wheel as a reference. Here is what I got:

NinjaWheelAlignment.png

Thanks again

Nice drawing. You draft/use CAD? Did a bit of drafting in highschool myself... still have my drafting table and arm. :busted:

As far as the bike, do you have to continue to use that same shop? Can you try a different shop to get a second opinion? Seems like that outfit you're dealing with now is trying to give you the runaround.

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