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what engines fit into a 1992 wr 200 chassis?

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I just bought a 1992 wr200 and need to get a new engine I was wondering if a y z 250 engine or a ktm 200 engine would fit

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Transmissions look hard, but they really aren't. What's the problem?

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won't shift out of 3rd and power cuts off at like 1000 rpms and leaks ALOT of oil

Get yourself a good manual and go to work on it. The little two strokes are simple and you can save a lot of money and hassle. The gear boxs look scary but really are not. The engine is so simple to rebuild you won't believe it. Looka t some of the you-tube videos to get a sense of what you need to do.

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I have the bike at a shop right now and they are diagnosing it. I would fix it myself but I'm 14 and tend to stay away from transmissions

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I have the bike at a shop right now and they are diagnosing it. I would fix it myself but I'm 14 and tend to stay away from transmissions

Perfect time to figure it out. Give yourself credit, us old guys aren't so smart and somehow we get it together.

Do you have a shop manual?

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It will be harder to stick a different engine in than it would be to fix the one that belongs in the bike.

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If all else fails, a Blaster motor should bolt up to the mounts, and I think the pipe connections are compatible at some level. The pipes will be totally different, but one of the Blaster engine building specialists could probably port it to work pretty well with the WR pipe. Don't know about space for cooling fins, etc. The WR should have a much larger carb, which will really help. I'd be surprised if mixing and matching parts between the two couldn't get a workable system.

Blaster gearing is actually pretty cool. It has a tractor-low first, which would be very interesting in a trail bike for mountain goat climbing, then the 2-6 gears are pretty close to stock YZ 1-5.

This is the one bike I think swapping a Blaster motor into would actually be a reasonable DIY project for someone without mad pipe building skillz. The WR pipe still goes up high, so using that pipe doesn't work to swap the Blaster motor into a more modern bike chassis, but I'm pretty sure it "should" work in the WR chassis. :busted:

If you're 14 and haven't been tearing things all the way apart for a few years already, you might need some help with a project like this. It's one of those things that someone with experience and know-how can work through pretty steadily, but could look like a brick wall to someone who hasn't been around the loop a few times. A lot depends on whether $100 seems like a lot of money to you at this point, given your financial support system for this hobby. That's for you to think about, I'm not asking and wouldn't suggest you discuss it online too much.

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get a clymer manual. definately worth it.

i may not know much but with a manual and the tools (not to mention the old braniacs on here that put up with my stupidity... :busted: ) i can get it done! so what i'm saying is, "if a retarted monkey with a stick can do it, so can you! :busted: i've never dug into trannys but i think the only hard part would be getting the shift forks to line up and getting it to line up in the cases!

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^ or you could just buy the bottom end from a bike (cases transmission and all) .. and put a new top on it.. but only from a reliable parts source! and then you've got an extra set of cases, crank, etc.

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Buy a good manual and fix it :busted:

Take your time and do it right and take a break once in awhile if you get confused. Its intimidating at first but you'll find figure it out.

Plus you couldn't ask for a better bike than a WR200 at your age :busted:

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If all else fails, a Blaster motor should bolt up to the mounts, and I think the pipe connections are compatible at some level. The pipes will be totally different, but one of the Blaster engine building specialists could probably port it to work pretty well with the WR pipe. Don't know about space for cooling fins, etc. The WR should have a much larger carb, which will really help. I'd be surprised if mixing and matching parts between the two couldn't get a workable system.

Blaster gearing is actually pretty cool. It has a tractor-low first, which would be very interesting in a trail bike for mountain goat climbing, then the 2-6 gears are pretty close to stock YZ 1-5.

This is the one bike I think swapping a Blaster motor into would actually be a reasonable DIY project for someone without mad pipe building skillz. The WR pipe still goes up high, so using that pipe doesn't work to swap the Blaster motor into a more modern bike chassis, but I'm pretty sure it "should" work in the WR chassis. :busted:

If you're 14 and haven't been tearing things all the way apart for a few years already, you might need some help with a project like this. It's one of those things that someone with experience and know-how can work through pretty steadily, but could look like a brick wall to someone who hasn't been around the loop a few times. A lot depends on whether $100 seems like a lot of money to you at this point, given your financial support system for this hobby. That's for you to think about, I'm not asking and wouldn't suggest you discuss it online too much.

From what I understand, the blaster is an air hammer and the WR200 was a water jug originally from a scooter application. I would think it to be pure luck if they bolt up and the countershaft lines up properly with the rear end, and the kickstart doesn't have any interference :busted:

Maybe, I've got no experience with this conversion.

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I have the bike at a shop right now and they are diagnosing it. I would fix it myself but I'm 14 and tend to stay away from transmissions

As others have said, get a good manual for your bike and give it a try. With what shops charge, you will very quickly surpass what the bike will be worth letting them figure it out.

As long as the cases are in good condition (read not cracked) you should be able to do everything to get that bottom end apart and inspected in a Saturday afternoon. Most parts are readily available as long as you don't need the cases. You really only need some basic tools and you can build a case splitter yourself.

If you have a digital camera (absolutely the best tool in my shop), take lots of pictures as you take it apart and make sure the pics are not blurry as you go. Those will help you get everything back together the same way it came apart.

Seriously, at 14 years of age, figuring out how to split cases and reassemble the bottom end will save you thousands over your riding lifetime. Not to mention you can use your knowledge and skills to make some money from riding buddies later in life who never learned to do bottom ends.

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From what I understand, the blaster is an air hammer and the WR200 was a water jug originally from a scooter application. I would think it to be pure luck if they bolt up and the countershaft lines up properly with the rear end, and the kickstart doesn't have any interference :busted:

Maybe, I've got no experience with this conversion.

Short versions:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamaha_Blaster

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamaha_DT200

Some Googling will get you the rest of the way.

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