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TXC 250, will it eat itself?

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Hello All,

So long story short, I walked into my Husky dealer and saw that their pricing is pretty sweet right now, $5,300.00 for a TXC 250. This is really tempting, but I do not know much about the bikes maintenance reputation. How long does a motor last.

This is also tempting because my second hand '04 CRF 250x needs a valve job, chain, new fork slider (scratched it pretty good), ect. I love that bike and enjoy my local 250 hairscramble race class, but how do these bikes hold up? I understand normal wear items like a chain and what not, but I am not excited another $800 into. If I buy this Huskey, will I have to spend $500 on a valve job in 50hrs?

How are yours holding up?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

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just like what Ride said.they hold up great.they are easier than most bikes to work on and pricing for parts is very reasonable!buy with absolute confidence,hare scramble the heck out of it and if you do well get HUSKY BUCKS!dan

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The bike that I was looking at was a 2011 txc 250, it is apart of the Hero's Ride Huskeys program that they are pushing now.

I am just tired of always working on my well worn CRF and I was hoping that the this Huskey did not need as much attention to the valves. It would be new and there would be no questionable history that I have to methodically work through. How many hours of use do you get before a rebuild? What does the manuel suggest vs. what are your experiences? My Honda is notorious for eating titanium intake valves, an experience that I hope to skip if I bite the Huskey bullet.

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I am just tired of always working on my well worn CRF and I was hoping that the this Huskey did not need as much attention to the valves. It would be new and there would be no questionable history that I have to methodically work through. How many hours of use do you get before a rebuild? What does the manuel suggest vs. what are your experiences? My Honda is notorious for eating titanium intake valves, an experience that I hope to skip if I bite the Huskey bullet.

bad Japanese made valves were a problem for quite a few 2004 model bikes,

husky redesigned the head for '05 and VERY few problems reported since,

the TXC is a slightly different design now, but yes it's a sound well engineered bike, but may need some set-up / dialling in,

others will add to this ( we don't get the TXC here - it's US markets only)

Charlie

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The x-light motor does not eat valves. The valvetrain in this bike is very solid. Been proven over and over.

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The brake in period is very important on these bikes. If done with restraint your 250 should last a very long time.

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Fred Andrew's Racing GNCC Hisqvarna team has been running pretty close to stock 3011 TXC250s and winning 3 hour cross country races in the process.

I'd have say if his team or riders can't kill the bike

, then it's a good bike.

2011 husky program is a great deal for anyone in the market for a good dependable race bike.

There I said it.

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Fred Andrew's Racing GNCC Hisqvarna team has been running pretty close to stock 3011 TXC250s and winning 3 hour cross country races in the process.

I'd have say if his team or riders can't kill the bike

, then it's a good bike.

2011 husky program is a great deal for anyone in the market for a good dependable race bike.

There I said it.

How do I get one of those 3011 txc250s?

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I had my x-lite engine apart. My only concern is with the cylinder head/cams. I have to wonder why the cams do not use bearings?

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I had my x-lite engine apart. My only concern is with the cylinder head/cams. I have to wonder why the cams do not use bearings?

Most every High-performance fourstroke engine built by every manufacturer doesn't use bearings, they ride on a pressurized film of oil. Not just MX bikes but inline 4 cylinder 180hp literbikes. This design is lighter and will wear longer than any roller bearing provided it never runs low on good clean oil and no debris. It's a plus, not a worrypoint.

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All my bikes have a bearing where the cam clamps to the head. This to me is a plus vs. oil film. Are we talking about the same contact area??

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Most every High-performance fourstroke engine built by every manufacturer doesn't use bearings, they ride on a pressurized film of oil. Not just MX bikes but inline 4 cylinder 180hp literbikes. This design is lighter and will wear longer than any roller bearing provided it never runs low on good clean oil and no debris. It's a plus, not a worrypoint.

TONS of bike use bearings on the cam. Some do not. Husky DOHC motors from 04 to 09 (250/450/510) current do...

rockers-1-M.jpg

Bearing less cam motors are fine as long as there is a nice supply of oil. Both systems can and will fail.

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TONS of bike use bearings on the cam. Some do not. Husky DOHC motors from 04 to 09 (250/450/510) current do...

QUOTE]

I'm well aware of the use of bearings on cams, it's cheap, requires less precise machining, and is generally only used on single-cylinder applications.

And it has been a common failure point. Husky DOHC motors loose that bearing with alarming regularity:bonk:. A rollerbearing WILL fail at some point, it is an assembly of moving parts. A plain bearing with oil clearance is way more reliable and will only fail if it loses oil. Trochoidal oil pumps rarely if ever fail, again only with dirt.

I'm defending the lack of a roller bearing in the xlite. It's an indicator of precise tolerances and a more advanced engine.

Not a single High-performance inline-four mc motor uses roller bearings.

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I agree was just point out the use of bearings as i thought you were assuming no one used them.

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It's all good!:busted: My CRF unicam uses bearings at both ends and is a neat design, I just prefer oil pillow!

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The reason I brought it up was if the engine runs low on oil you got a pretty good chance you're gonna ruin the head with the husky.

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Might have more than just the top end to worry about if that happens. I've seen situations in other engines where having too much oil will also cause starvation damage. Oil level too high can cause aeration in the oil (foam) due to a stirring action and the pump is not good at pumping foam. Don't know if that's possible on this motor, though.

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Might have more than just the top end to worry about if that happens. I've seen situations in other engines where having too much oil will also cause starvation damage. Oil level too high can cause aeration in the oil (foam) due to a stirring action and the pump is not good at pumping foam. Don't know if that's possible on this motor, though.

I paid $600 for a new cylinder I can only imagine that the head cost more. If I would have had to buy a new head I prolly wouldn't have put the bike back together.:busted:

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Might have more than just the top end to worry about if that happens. I've seen situations in other engines where having too much oil will also cause starvation damage. Oil level too high can cause aeration in the oil (foam) due to a stirring action and the pump is not good at pumping foam. Don't know if that's possible on this motor, though.

Good points and most motors can aerate their oil if too full. A siezed cam journal can most always be repaired by taking .002-.003 off the surfaces then having it re-line bored to restore concentricity. Run low on oil and loose the cam roller bearings and there are hardened parts getting pingponged around the motor, probably worse damage than a smeared journal.

I'm sure we can all agree that running ANY motor low/out of oil is no bueno, and will get you what your lack of maintenance deserves!

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