Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Spoke Torque Wrench Quality/Usability reviews? Tusk? Excel? Fasst?

Recommended Posts

I'm in the market for a real spoke wrench. One of type I assume the pros use, a torque spoke wrench. I see the tusk spoke torque wrench is much lower priced than the others, and also looks more modern design. I don't want to throw away my money and time though.

Has anyone used the Tusk spoke torque wrench and can give a review of its usability and quality? Should I spend the extra ~40 to get the Excel? Is that one good? Is the expensive Fasst the only way to go? Is there a better choice which I am not aware of?

Thanks for the help. :busted:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the Excel and love it. Never used another torque spoke wrench but any spoke torque wrench is better than no spoke torque wrench.

MAX!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got the excel one and it is great. $110 at motosport. It is very easy to use and comes with all the tips you should need. I noticed most of my spokes were to tight when I first bought this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me, these torque wrenches for spokes are a waste of money, unless you are actually building wheels. The main problem I see is that your spoke nipples will get contaminated through normal use from dirt and corrosion, rendering the torque values inaccurate. You would have to undertake a regular program of "nipple maintenance" (cleaning and greasing) to keep the spokes in good enough shape to use the torque wrench properly.

It's actually very easy to just give each spoke a tap after every other ride or so to check for tightness. If you do this you will never have any problems with wheels or spokes. If you should happen to buy a poorly maintained used bike, it's also very easy to "true" a bent wheel (for dirt bike use) by tweaking spoke tightness on either side of the rim. I've been doing this since the 70s (when wheels really sucked!), and this is all today's wheels need.

P.S. I would actually be surprised if "the pros" actually use spoke torque wrenches. I use torque wrenches for all kinds of things on dirt bikes, but for spokes you quickly develop a "feel" for how tight they should be with a little practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had the same thoughts. Although I've never used one, I can't believe the torque would remain accurate after a few rides/washes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could not have said it any better.

But to answer the OP question, both the Excel and the FASST wrenches are of very high quality.

To me, these torque wrenches for spokes are a waste of money, unless you are actually building wheels. The main problem I see is that your spoke nipples will get contaminated through normal use from dirt and corrosion, rendering the torque values inaccurate. You would have to undertake a regular program of "nipple maintenance" (cleaning and greasing) to keep the spokes in good enough shape to use the torque wrench properly.

It's actually very easy to just give each spoke a tap after every other ride or so to check for tightness. If you do this you will never have any problems with wheels or spokes. If you should happen to buy a poorly maintained used bike, it's also very easy to "true" a bent wheel (for dirt bike use) by tweaking spoke tightness on either side of the rim. I've been doing this since the 70s (when wheels really sucked!), and this is all today's wheels need.

P.S. I would actually be surprised if "the pros" actually use spoke torque wrenches. I use torque wrenches for all kinds of things on dirt bikes, but for spokes you quickly develop a "feel" for how tight they should be with a little practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The FASST is a very good one, I wouldn't look past it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To me, these torque wrenches for spokes are a waste of money, unless you are actually building wheels. The main problem I see is that your spoke nipples will get contaminated through normal use from dirt and corrosion, rendering the torque values inaccurate. You would have to undertake a regular program of "nipple maintenance" (cleaning and greasing) to keep the spokes in good enough shape to use the torque wrench properly.

It's actually very easy to just give each spoke a tap after every other ride or so to check for tightness. If you do this you will never have any problems with wheels or spokes. If you should happen to buy a poorly maintained used bike, it's also very easy to "true" a bent wheel (for dirt bike use) by tweaking spoke tightness on either side of the rim. I've been doing this since the 70s (when wheels really sucked!), and this is all today's wheels need.

P.S. I would actually be surprised if "the pros" actually use spoke torque wrenches. I use torque wrenches for all kinds of things on dirt bikes, but for spokes you quickly develop a "feel" for how tight they should be with a little practice.

Very good point about thread condition vs torque indicator accuracy. The way to really know WOULD be to ping each one to the same sound pitch, now that you helped me to think about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way to really know WOULD be to ping each one to the same sound pitch, now that you helped me to think about it. just so ya know the right "tune" of the "ping", you will be good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The way to really know WOULD be to ping each one to the same sound pitch, now that you helped me to think about it.
just so ya know the right "tune" of the "ping", you will be good.

That's the next question I was thinking, what is the correct note for the ping?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the next question I was thinking, what is the correct note for the ping?

I would think any ping is a good ping. When a spoke is loose it won't ping...it's more of a dull "thud' sound.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That's the next question I was thinking, what is the correct note for the ping?

I would think any ping is a good ping. When a spoke is loose it won't ping...it's more of a dull "thud' sound.

Agreed. Any ping is good, and I would not put much weight on the "note" (pitch), as that will be affected by dirt and all sorts of extraneous variables. A loose spoke is easy to hear. The sound is hard to describe--maybe a dull rattle--but you will know it when you hear it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

find a trued, ready to go wheel that has had the spokes torqued properly and ping on the spokes to get yur ear in tune with the right ping. Ifn ya got a decent guitar player in yur camp, he/she can help ya out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×