How do I Rebuild My 91 XR200 Rear Shock??!!!

I have searched everywhere, and have still not yet found a good write up on how to rebuild my xr200 rear shock.:busted:

It is a 91 and has the hose and remote reservoir. It is ment to be rebuildable.

My dad is an engineer so we have the tools and means. I will also be doing a 85 XR250 Rear shock as well. But I think they are pritty much the same.:busted:

Do I need to replace the Nitrogen Bladder?? or don't they wear out much??

Cheers.

Get a Honda shop manual, available on ebay. Also check out the part fiche for 91 to see an exploded view of the shock.

Edited by chuck4788
correct year to 91

from what i know about xr200s, the shock is not rebuildable. though ive heard that some suspension experts have done it

Thru 91 they have a remote reservoir and can be rebuilt. A circlip holds the seal head in place. I don't think 93 and on can be rebuilt, unless a rebuilder has a way to open the body and then reseal it.

Can you give me a quick idea of what to do.

There is no quick idea. You just have to get a manual and follow the directions. There are "how to's" on YOU TUBE, but it won't be for that exact shock. I've seen it done and it isn't too difficult, you just need to do a bunch of times to get it down. You will need to refill it with nitrogen. Last time I did it, I took it to a local shop and it was like 5 or 10 bucks. Personally I don't do suspension, because it's done so infreqently, it's hard to get good at it. That's why most people just send it off.

Basically, you really need a shop manual for this kind of work. It's not complicated, but the manual is specific on how this is done with damaging the shock. Sorry, but Chuck is right... get a shop manual. I can spend two hours on this forum describing the steps but it wouldn't make sense.

FYI, here is an example of a rebuild, which would be similar but not exact to the steps needed to rebuild your XR shock: http://www.gasgasrider.org/Sachs_Rear_Husky_610.pdf

KDXIdaho

Ive done a few and they are real easy.

I wote this after i did my first one. Be sure to get the manual before you tear it all apart.

Do a search and you sould be able to get plenty of info.

I just got done rebuilding my 86 shock and i'm doing my buddys 90 right now. The parts list you have should be all you need. The oil that came out of my 86 was horrible. Its a wonder it even worked. The manual didn't show how to disasemble the bladder. Its just like any later model shock, tap the cover (end with air valve) in until the snap ring is exposed. Don't scrach the housing when you remove the snap ring or it will cut the bladder when you remove it (honda has no bladder listing alone) Pull the cover out with pliers. The bladder will be attached to the cover. I had more crap in there than anywhere else.

When you grind to remove the shaft nut grind exactly what the manual shows and grind it flat. It makes it easier to stake on reassembly. If you chase the threads I think it is 12mm x 1.5. I only used at thread file. I was tight on reassembly but was ok.

I didn't refill the shock the way the manual shows. I held the shock body upside with the hose and can attached filled it with fluid and droped the piston assembly in. Pump untill no more air bubbles in the can, top off can and slide bladder in. Turn shock so that banjo nut it at the top, add approx 5 psi air to the bladder and bleed remaining air from banjo nut. Very messy but less possibliity of traped air.

I used mobile 1 atf.

Good luck its easier that it sounds.

I didn't disassemble the compression clicker either. Brake clean and compresed air worked fine.

Ive done a few and they are real easy.

I wote this after i did my first one. Be sure to get the manual before you tear it all apart.

Do a search and you sould be able to get plenty of info.

I just got done rebuilding my 86 shock and i'm doing my buddys 90 right now. The parts list you have should be all you need. The oil that came out of my 86 was horrible. Its a wonder it even worked. The manual didn't show how to disasemble the bladder. Its just like any later model shock, tap the cover (end with air valve) in until the snap ring is exposed. Don't scrach the housing when you remove the snap ring or it will cut the bladder when you remove it (honda has no bladder listing alone) Pull the cover out with pliers. The bladder will be attached to the cover. I had more crap in there than anywhere else.

When you grind to remove the shaft nut grind exactly what the manual shows and grind it flat. It makes it easier to stake on reassembly. If you chase the threads I think it is 12mm x 1.5. I only used at thread file. I was tight on reassembly but was ok.

I didn't refill the shock the way the manual shows. I held the shock body upside with the hose and can attached filled it with fluid and droped the piston assembly in. Pump untill no more air bubbles in the can, top off can and slide bladder in. Turn shock so that banjo nut it at the top, add approx 5 psi air to the bladder and bleed remaining air from banjo nut. Very messy but less possibliity of traped air.

I used mobile 1 atf.

Good luck its easier that it sounds.

I didn't disassemble the compression clicker either. Brake clean and compresed air worked fine.

Good info but Mobile 1 ATF? ATF is a light gear oil but is still way too thick for a shock, Honda specs a 2.5 wt shock fluid, I suggest Kayaba shock oil or Showa Suspension Fluid SS25, or equivalent. Honda, Racetech and others also have shock oil of similar viscosity. Check out http://www.peterverdone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Suspension_Fluid

But in the service manual it does state to use ATF or equivalent. So I could see the Mobile 1 as a upgrade, although to heavy of a oil. Myself I used Maxium Med.(7wt) And be ready to get your hands oily. Just doesn't seem any clean way to bleed all the air out.

But in the service manual it does state to use ATF or equivalent. So I could see the Mobile 1 as a upgrade, although to heavy of a oil. Myself I used Maxium Med.(7wt) And be ready to get your hands oily. Just doesn't seem any clean way to bleed all the air out.

Yes, ATF is recommended in the manual but I believe it is for the damper rod forks.

Three types of shocks on dirt bikes; damper rod forks, cartridge forks, and rear shocks. Each uses a different viscosity fluid. In general ATF is three times thicker than shock fluid, and cartridge fork fluid is about 40% thicker than shock fluid.

ATF is the recommended fluid for damper rod forks although a lot of folks have had good results with 7.5wt, even with emulators. The problem with using ATF or any oil based on the SAE label weight class is the viscosity is based on tests at 100 degrees C (212F) far higher than the operating temps in a fork, in addition each SAE weight class has a wide range of viscosity. So your idea of using a synthetic ATF is good because the syn won't thicken as much when at normal temps but still too thick for a shock. Peter’s Wikipedia article on suspension fluid is a good starting point. While the article has some complex formulas and the text provides good background info, it is the tables on oil viscosity at 40 degrees C (104F) that are important. http://pvdwiki.com/index.php?title=Suspension_Fluid

The problem with using 15wt or thicker oils in damper rod forks is they may make the bike feel stable but that can lead to hydraulic lock on sharp edge bumps resulting in harshness. The Racetech Suspension Bible (a very good read) says their track testing indicates that riders prefer the feel of over damp suspension, but turn better lap times when the damping is looser.

In general cartridge forks use 5wt class fluids and rear shocks use 2.5wt class fluid. All of the bike and suspension manufacturers, as well as 3rd parties such as Maxima, Redline, Racetech, PJ1, Spectro etc sell suspension fluid specific for the different types of forks and shock that will suit most uses.

Edited by chuck4788

Chuck, the manual realy does say to use ATF or equivalent oil in the rear shock. 1986-87 Honda service manual in the rear suspension section. That being said, the information you provide everyone with is very helpfull. That article on the suspension fluid is a real eye opener. One can truely see side by side how the oil performs.

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