Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

New to 2-strokes, Got a Question

Recommended Posts

Little background first. Grew up riding an XR250R. After school I wanted to start riding again and found an old XR500R. Bitch to start but was a blast to ride. Sold that when I moved up north and started riding street bikes. When I came back down south I picked up an '02 (or '03, can't remember) CRF450R. Wow, that was different. Loved having a tight & nimble chassis with real suspension compared to my old bikes. Power was dramatically different too. But in the woods I was always wrestling with it. Saw a guy on craigslist looking to trade his '01 YZ250 for a 450 thumper. I thought what the hell. I've always been curious about 2-strokes so I got in touch with him and made a deal. Bike is in great shape aside from the water pump seal going out the other day. I love the thing in the woods and am falling in love with the characteristics of the power delivery.

Here's my dilemma. I don't ride with any else who has a 2-stoke so I have no one to 'mentor' me in the proper way to ride the thing. I know I shouldn't use the engine for braking on descents. That's right isn't it? But should I be pulling the clutch anytime I'm off the throttle. I watched the video in the post below and he is pulling the clutch anytime he's off the throttle. In my opinion the guy looks pretty darn good. Is he doing that b/c he's good? Is it just the way some guys ride? Or is this the way anyone riding a smoker should be riding?

Any advice will be appreciated.

http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1025626

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

from what I understand is you pull the clutch in from high rev because you dont want to starve the crank of oil,like if your racing up a road wide open and decide to slow down instead of letting it coast with the throttle closed(high rev but not alot of fuel/oil passing throught the carb)you pull the clutch and the engine idles with the throttle closed and gets the proper oil/fuel for the rpms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I noticed from a four stroke to two stroke is that you need to keep it in the rpms more. But don't get me wrong a yz250 has more than enough torque if you need to lug it.

But the power is different. The four strokes have a more linear power band so its going to be smoother which you probably know. As for a two stroke the power curve is different. Its not as linear but like I said you can make it more linear if you by add a flywheel weight, get it ported by EG for what you want it to do.

Now as for riding I usually work the clutch more. I usually try to keep it in the rpms a little.bit. but one thing I noticed from my 09 yz450f is that the 2 stroke doesn't have engine breaking so you can carry your momentum much better and it doesn't stall as easy.....or at all hahaha.

Just get used to maybe working the clutch a little but like.I said when I had my yz250 07 I worked to clutch a little but not.much. the bike has plenty of torque. And I rode tight singletrack. Anything

Sorry for the essay hahaha

Thanks and god bless

Alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went from a 450 to an 01 yz250, then to an 05 yz 250. I struggled and it took me a year to figure it out. Here's my advice...

Who says that you shouldn't use the engine braking for downhills. Use it, its fine. Obviously, you have to be clutching if you aren't on the gas and you are in gear. But for downhills, I am usually most successful when I am powering down the hill and not just coasting. Find the right gear, for the speed you are going down and be on the gas very slightly. Then you won't need the clutch and will have more control

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched the video and it looks like he is feathering the clutch quite a bit, some call this fanning, and it is done to get the bike in high revs through tight trail. You are pulling the clutch so you can give a bit of throttle (and not have the bike lurching forward) coming into the corner and keeping the bike "on the pipe", and thus the revs are there when you release the clutch coming out of the corners. It is just a way to keep power to the bike without it being truly unbridled. I have a 125 I must do this with in order to ride well and keep the bike in and around its torque range to pull. I doubt he is doing it for torque as he is on a 250, but it still allows the bike to have its power when it needs it and when he is ready for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the responses guys! I know I don't use my clutch enough to stay on the pipe the way I want to but seat time will help that. I wanted to make sure I wasn't oil starving it if I used the compression braking of the engine. I know on long decel's to pull it in but was worried it might be all decel's. I've got some work to do. Thanks again for the help, great bunch of guys on here! :busted:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the trails and on tracks use the engine braking. Especially as you come into a corner. You don't want to freewheel into a corner. Downshift and use the brakes before you start your turn. You'll hear the chain and rear suspension chatter a little bit when you are doing it just right. (Actually, that goes for both 4 and 2 stroke bikes).

Woods sections and tracks won't hurt the bike at all.

On a fast 5th-gear-pinned fire-road section, pin it to get up to speed. When you are coasting through the longer faster turns pull the clutch in then get back in it as you sweep out of the turn. The same goes for long fast high RPM downhills. It will allow your engine to cool off a bit and keep it lubed properly.

Unless you are running 50:1 or something, you'll probably never have a single issue with this.

...But for downhills, I am usually most successful when I am powering down the hill and not just coasting. Find the right gear, for the speed you are going down and be on the gas very slightly. Then you won't need the clutch and will have more control

If you ride the rear brake while staying on the gas in the attack position, it will suck the rear suspension down and make the bike more stable down the hills. One of my local tracks (OPMC Port Angeles) is a perfect example of that technique. I pass people there all the time using that method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are worried about deccel and lack of cooling/lube then push the kill switch and open up the throttle. I never ever do that but I heard some flat track quad racers do just before a turn. But they are pinned and making some heat in the straights. I asked them why they do it. I was told that because some tend to run a little lean to begin with for power and simply shutting down by throttle only doesn't cool the engine much. It's probably a different topic that I shouldn't have mentioned here. I can only imagine what would happen on a downhill with a finger on the kill switch with the throttle wide open and suddenly a rut jars you finger off of the kill switch. I guess that would be like a space shuttle launch. So never mine I mentioned it. Besides, space shuttle launches are a thing of the past, thanks to Obama. Sorry, I just had tyo get that in.

Just ride the way you do and you will be fine. I pull the clutch often on deccels myself. Just habbit I guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×