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Boiling gas on TE250 2011

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I was riding on the woods all day monday, temperature was 90's

Suddenly my bike dies and i though that it was out of gas, but when i was going to open the gas cap about 1/8 of the turn felt and hear pressure coming out

After a couple minutes of releasing the pressure opened the gas cap and saw the gas boiling.

I changed my gas cap to an aftermarket and has the shorty vent

Does anyone with the same problem?

Thanks

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Those shorty vents have one way valves. Get rid of it and put the vent tube back on it. That way built up pressure can vent out. I ounce had so much pressure in the tank that the tank deformed and the shrouds wouldn't fit to the lowers. Don't know what to tell you about boiling gas. Never had that happen on a Husky

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+1, seen too many problems with those shorty vents.

Have boiled gas in the heat on metal tanks many times. One thing you might do is cover the bottom of the tank with alum tape, but if your tank is vented right it would help too.

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Was the bike running when you witness the boiling behavior or was bike and ignition completely off when you openned the cap and noticed bubbling?

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Those shorty vents have one way valves. Get rid of it and put the vent tube back on it. That way built up pressure can vent out.

The vent tube has a one way valve. Both should vent pressure. If the shorty is not, it is defective and should be replaced.

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The vent tube has a one way valve. Both should vent pressure. If the shorty is not, it is defective and should be replaced.

The one way valve allows air to enter the tank as gas is consumed, preventing vapor lock (negative pressure in the tank). It does NOT allow air or gasoline vapor to exit the tank when the temperature of the tank is increased (positive pressure in the tank).

Gasoline can boil at a very low temperature (100 degrees F) and will do so even more readily if it has been at high pressure (heated tank) and then the pressure is released (remove the cap).

The cap valve is not defective. It's just not the right solution for a gas tank that gets heated while little fuel is being consumed. It's possible that the bike stopped running not from vapor lock, but from a flooded condition if the gas pressure was more than the needle valve in the carb could hold.

The OP should use an unvalved vent hose for warm weather/low fuel usage conditions.

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I wonder if the OP's EFI bike is equally vulnerable to positive pressure flooding? I would think the regulator would compensate or prevent it but am not really sure.

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Didn't happen on my Husky but on my WR250R in Utah this summer. Hard rocky single track and all at once I'm getting sprayed in the face. Manage to stop and I'm soaked in gas--face shield was open as I was riding alone. So here I am using my camel back to flush my eyes. When I get where I can see the short hose and aftermarket vent had ejected from the bike and the fuel had sprayed up out of the gas cap. I had just filled the tank about 10 miles earlier so it was now hot, full pressurized and well shaken--not somethng I want to experience again--no more little valves for me.:busted:

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Went to Cycle Gear and the new shorty valve it is the same way. One Way.

Don't use a valve at all. that's the point. You need it to breath both ways.

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Well i removed the shorty valve an get me the long hose with a 2 way valve

I think that is going to be my solution

I have a race saturday and sunday so ill keep you posted

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I wonder if the OP's EFI bike is equally vulnerable to positive pressure flooding? I would think the regulator would compensate or prevent it but am not really sure.

D'oh! Stupid me.

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