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Anybody cross train on trials bicycles?

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Well, the snow is falling as I type this so I'll probably start overhauling the Montesa pretty soon... I just don't want to stop practicing! So with a large shop and barn, I was thinking I might be able to practice on a trials bike(-cycle!)

Problem is I don't know much about them... How do they compare as far as skills crossover to motorcycles? Looks like there are a lot of similarities but a lot of big differences, too.

And then there's the price! I don't really want to spend more than a few hundred on something that doesn't even have a motor in it! Is there a decent priced bike I should look at? I'd like to have something with disk brakes though due to an irrational hatred of rim brakes I have...:busted: I realize that will add a bit more to the price tag.

Otherwise where can I find a US based place to get parts like pedals, sprockets, wheels, brakes, etc.? I'm pretty handy with a welder and I think making a custom frame over the winter would be an awesome project! I'd just need to buy some of the other odds and ends to bolt onto it.

Thanks for any advice!

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Balance is balance. It can't hurt.

My friend use to practice on his mtn bike about 1/2 hour every day. Track stands and bunny hops. He said that stationary practice was key and doing it every day. He use to drive bike shops crazy when he'd pull a bike off the rack and hop the front wheel over object. He won the California intermediate class state championship and quit. At 30+, he didn't want to compete in the expert class against 20 somethings.

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Pro Trials riders use rim brakes.

Look here

http://northwesttrials.webs.com/

Thanks for the link.

I know lots of guys use rim brakes, especially for the rears but I still hate them:foul: They never seem to work for me, maybe it's just because the ones I've had experience with were lower quality.

I think Brian over at NW trials might be just the guy I need to talk to! If I can get some parts from him, then maybe I can build myself a frame.

I was also thinking a good way to do some indoor practice might be to have some fun with my frame while I'm rebuilding the engine. Might be a good way to learn some hops and stuff. I really suck at hopping. I was trying today and the back wheel kept on slipping backwards on the shop floor so it was almost impossible :busted: I'm probably doing it all wrong anyway, seems like I'm putting way too much effort into it compared to the guys that just bounce the front wheel with just their knees...

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One of the benfits of building your own frame is choosing the geometry you want, at this stage you don't know much about how the bottom bracket height or head angle affects the ride of a trials bike or if you want to go into the natural/competition or street side of trials, so my advise is to hold on a little and start on a used bike before building your own frame.

Rim brakes used on trials bikes are hydraulic maguras or some chinese knock offs .. properly setup they are nothing like the V-brakes you probably know and incredibly powerful since they don't care about spoke flex, modulation sucks though. They can be a pain to set up and requiere a ground rim to work 100%. Disc brakes are used on 20" or 24" bikes where spoke flex is not as crucial and are much simpler to maintain, but when starting you do run the risk of smashing your disk and ruining it.

check the FS section of this forum http://www.observedtrials.net/

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Yes, I was looking at the Magura hydraulic rim brakes and the M2 disk brakes. Both look like a good option for my budget.

I was thinking the same thing about building a frame, but I figure I can basically copy the geometry of an existing bike to start with.

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.. yes but what geometry will you copy ?

a high BB/head angle which has nice clearance and is easier to get on to the back wheel but unstable... or the opposite which is good for manualing, bunny hopping, balance...

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You said you had access to a "large" shop and barn?? If you are allowed to run your motor even for limited amounts of time, a big indoor place is plenty of room to practice balance and control. With a few items like pallets and spools or RR ties, you can build some simple objects to work with every bit as much as you could a bicycle..

Not that the bicycle is a waste of time. Most of the top Euro Trials Motorcycle guys started on bicycles and then switched to motorized.. Not many have gone the other way.

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Yeah, I'm not so sure the boss would be too pleased with me running the stinky smoker in his shop when I have free time:busted: Although I might be able to run it in the barn a little but it's smaller. I've been practicing static balance in the shop recently but I still suck at hopping... I think my rear brake might be a little soft, I really have to push hard to get the rear wheel not to slip, like all my weight from that foot on the brake. Is this normal for hops? I'll try bleeding the brake, too I might have gotten a bubble in there when I flushed them a while ago. Or it could be that some spooge dripped off the end of the pipe and on to it, there's some splatter on the caliper.

Anyway, practice practice practice! Hopefully soon I'll be able to hold the bike in balance with the front wheel straight, I think that will be a much better base for me to practice hopping with.

As for the bicycle, that's just it. Either I'd be buying a frame with X geometry and not knowing if it is good or not for me or I'd be copying the bike with X geometry and not knowing if it will be good for me... I wonder what it would be like to as closely as possible copy the geometry of my montesa? There's that whole non-static pedal thing though:bonk: Hmmm...

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You said you had access to a "large" shop and barn?? If you are allowed to run your motor even for limited amounts of time, a big indoor place is plenty of room to practice balance and control. With a few items like pallets and spools or RR ties, you can build some simple objects to work with every bit as much as you could a bicycle..

Not that the bicycle is a waste of time. Most of the top Euro Trials Motorcycle guys started on bicycles and then switched to motorized.. Not many have gone the other way.

Or how about an electric bike! That would be a blast!

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