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Is restoration a mental illness?

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I got a 82 xl185 for 450 a few years ago. Cosmetics totally atrocious but it ran,, didn't smoke. Mechanically it could be a little hard to start and flooded easy. No biggie.

Since then I have spent money on money on it, more than I purchased it for. gas tank less dented, levers, repair manual, tires, tubes, seat cover, grips, plug, carb, throttle cable, choke cable, speedo, sprocket cover, battery, paint.

I guess I wont be happy until it looks and acts brand new. Is that an illness instead of being content with an ugly toy that somewhat works it's purpose? Does my rationalizing work I couldn't get a bike equal to this reworked vintage beauty for the same money?

I am also working on a 1990 DR350S and my aberrant behavior is even more outrageous. I am fuel injecting it.

Anybody else suffering from this syndrome? Can we start an old bike refreshers anonymous support group?

Anybody else afflicted? Can we start an old bike addiction program.

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Yes it is a sickness. Get professional help before you alienate everyone in your life and you spend all your money and become homeless.

I enjoy working on bikes too but I realize I can have a problem with it when I have a hard time deciding on whether to spend money on necessities but don't think twice about getting something for the bike or when my garage and yard start to look like a junkyard with all the past, current and future projects staring me down looking for attention.

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it is ........ a wanting for something that is unattainable now and was in the past something you admired and or wanted but never had. It is a time machine in and of itself returning you and the bike back to a better time? for you anyway. A time when things were simpler, for you and the world you lived in. Bringing back that machine to it's former glory - takes you on a trip too, a mental escape, and a state of gratification when it is finished and admired by you and others.

If it is a sickness, I have it. I like it. I would not trade anything for it.

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I call it Garage Therapy. My family always knows where I am all the time, plus they get to benefit of riding some cool vintage bkes!

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My wife thinks my life's goal is to rescue much abused small Hondas from Craigslist and get them running again.

It might be the SL100, XR80, XR100R, and TL125 I purchased in a year.

The SL100 and XR80 were sold. Too many motorcycles for my garage to hold.

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My wife thinks my life's goal is to rescue much abused small Hondas from Craigslist and get them running again.

It might be the SL100, XR80, XR100R, and TL125 I purchased in a year.

The SL100 and XR80 were sold. Too many motorcycles for my garage to hold.[/QUOTE]

Yes, Kev...sounds like you have a problem.

I suggest a bigger garage.

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I have restored a few to new condition---not cheap to do! like you said where does it end. I started to restore old chainsaw's--much cheaper and don't take up as much space. lol. i do have a tt500 to finish and a friend just gave me a Rokon--the party keeps on going and the road never ends. have fun----

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Its like a drug addiction, an illness and a financial burden.

Hi, my name is Brian and I have a problem with fixing up old bikes. Seriously though, I don't restore bikes, I look at it more as refurbishing them. I cant afford a nut and bolt restoration and then I wouldn't want to ride them and get them dirty. I make sure my bikes are mechanically sound before they look pretty, and they are nice looking as long as you are an arms length away from them. Its a little easier on the wallet to make a nice rider than a resto.

Edited by jonboat

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Yep I am affected with the Resto disease! www.kx125project.blogspot.com and I am looking for the next one before this one is even finished. It is so gratifying to bring back some thing that was almost lost to neglect. My body is telling me that riding to my once pro level potential is not practical any longer and can only be done a few times a year, but working on the bikes i love can be done year round with out as much pain. The money part is difficult but if it is a true passion you can find a way to make it happen.

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Mostly I do working retorations/ Not perfect frame up, every nut and bolt type. I do have two going for that level, but have strayed an reused hardware etc, they take forever when you go down to the frame. the two I mentioned are a 71 SL350 and a 72 TS400. I also have going a 67 CL160 for my brother, and a 77 XL350 all done just finishing touches. In the back of my queue resides a TL125 down to a newly powder coated frame. No wheels (they were junk) just hubs, motor apart and the rest in boxes.

I use small plastic containers from walmart and "kit them" with new cables chain, sprockets, gasket sets, for each bike in my queue.

Also tend to bounce around alot, from bike to bike, just finished a 71 TS250R engine, and now onto the frame clean up, sanding, wire wheel cleaning etc. Removed swing arm and blew it down to bare metal in my bead blaster, still have to repack the forks, clean the shocks up, cleaning hardware, and also do the steering head bearings. New rear tire and use the OEM front for now, 3.25 X 19 as you know are rare as hens teeth.

It all takes time and alot of it. I don't buy alot of new parts, only what is needed, mostly I clean and repaint. Alot of time goes into diassembly and degreasing and then reassembly, like a clutch actuator in a sidecover all gummed up - stiff etc, I spent over an hour on that alone. Depends alot upon the complexity and "cooterisms" on the bike, in determining how long until it is complete to your satisfaction, that and the need for a part during the process, finding it, and waiting for it to come. It is probably an expensive hobby yes, but better than being in a bar all night only to wake up feeling like shit ion the morning and nothing nto show for it - except that pounding headache and nausea... (been there done that)

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oh and I forgot to mention the 1970 SL 100 I found that just needed a home.... it is waiting for a turn .....

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Rebuilding or restorating a bike has many aspects:

- search and find, (the right bike),

- research information, parts,

- trading for parts and bikes,

- frustration, (when something goes wrong),

- pleased, (when something goes right),

- patience, (when doing time very time consuming small things),

- happyness, (when you got the bike sorted),

- coolness, (when riding out the first time),

- social aspect, (getting in touch with other guy's having the same "illness")

This completly OK IMHO, there is nothing wrong with this and it has the advantage that you build up something from crap to something useful again.

This is the opposite of buying something and using it.

Edited by P-Schrauber
Added an "u" my English have sometimes issues

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- It is far cheaper and sometimes more useful than therapy.

- It has an end result that can often be sold to finance the next one.

- It is better for your body than copious amounts of liquor.

- I has more satisfaction and greater lasting pleasure than video games and TV events.

- If you involve someone else, it often creates a deep bond with them and brings them the advantages as well. Assuming you don't kill each other while doing it.

- And when you're done, you most likely don't have something someone else has in your area, sitting in your garage.

- What's not to like?

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I went for some professional rehab and the doc sold me his 76 TL250!!!!!!!

DSC00051.jpg

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:lol:

- It is far cheaper and sometimes more useful than therapy.

- It has an end result that can often be sold to finance the next one.

- It is better for your body than copious amounts of liquor.

- I has more satisfaction and greater lasting pleasure than video games and TV events.

- If you involve someone else, it often creates a deep bond with them and brings them the advantages as well. Assuming you don't kill each other while doing it.

- And when you're done, you most likely don't have something someone else has in your area, sitting in your garage.

- What's not to like?

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A lot of good comments in this thread.

I too am afflicted.

We live, sleep, dream of, and ride vintage bikes.

Yes, they consume time, money, patience, etc.

It is our money, our sanity, and our time. We enjoy it for what it's worth. There are many interests one can spend their life pursuing. Some good, some bad.

Old bikes just happen to be our thing. Don't question it for a minute. Just relax and enjoy the ride. Life is too short. You can't take any of it with you.

I have no regrets or remorse for enjoying what I enjoy and neither should any of you.

So what if it is a mental illness? Who will be the judge of that?

VIN

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