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Carb vs EFI

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Are the newer Fuel injected bikes as reliable as the older Carburated 4 strokes?

Wondering whether or not I should get an efi bike or stick to my 08 CRF 250 which has been pretty much problem-less.

I would be either getting a 2010 CRF or 2010 RMZ 250,

From what ive been hearing is that EFI bikes need more frequent rebuilds and they also have problems with leaking injectors...etc

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Ive had my ltr 450, which is EFI, for 4 years now, i ride the wheels off of it, and recently started racing it. the only issue ive had with it was a dirty fuel filter that made it run like crap. Other than that, just change oil, put gas, and ride!

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depends on the part, it's not a single component that repalces the carb

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What is the price of replacement for a EFI though compared to a carburetor? That is, if the EFI were to go out...

EFI is not a "thing", it's a system. You have the computer, throttle body, assorted sensors, injector, fuel pump, etc..The likeliness of it all going out at once is almost zero.

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What is the price of replacement for a EFI though compared to a carburetor? That is, if the EFI were to go out...

Depends on the bike but the fuel pump for Yamaha is about $250 and the injector is about $100. There's a couple of sensors also. I can't imagine a situation where you would need to replace the throttle body. For that matter I can't imagine a situation where you would need to replace the carburetor either, other than a fire or a bad collision.

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depends on the part, it's not a single component that repalces the carb

True true..I was thinking about the throttle body sensor went out on my GSXR and Suzuki does not sell just the sensor. So, I had to buy a complete secondary throttle body for my bike. Luckily a lot of squids ride GSXR 750's and I found a wrecked one w/ a good secondary throttle body assembly. I remember seeing the price for a new throttle body assembly and about pee'd myself. lol

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I went from an 06 yz250f to a 10 yz450f. It is unreal. I love it. Don't waste your time getting a new 250f, they are pointless.

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Lots of problems getting dirt into the tank causing filter plugging and pump failure. They make a sock that sits under the gas cap to prevent this, and I think it's the thing that will make the system pretty bulletproof.

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Ultimately a carburetor is more reliable, no one ever has a DNF because the carb broke, can't say the same about EFI. An EFI system has moving parts and elecrtric "stuff", "stuff" fails. Carbs can be fixed/cleaned easily, injectors need sent out. EFI complicates things and makes it harder to diagnose and fix problems yourself, ie you may be taking the bike to a dealer to get problems diagnosed.

All that being said, I haven't a single problem with my Berg, many have unfortunately. If I ever have an expierence so bad that I said to hell with EFI I don't think I could back to a carburated 4st, I'd have to go 2st. My Berg delivers fuel so precise and throttle response that is unreal, you almost can't stall the thing. I love it, I hope it never breaks :lol:

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More simple equals more reliable. Can't get any simpler than carbs. What bugs me the most is having to carry a heavy battery for FI. I just hate to mess with batteries tending and dying. In fact, my street bike just came back from the shop after the second battery died in less than 3 months. Battery can be expensive. Shop hourly rate for diagnose is even more. Dead battery on FI equals dead bike. Battery can go bad just by sitting on the shelf. Carb can sit on the shelf forever and not go bad.

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More simple equals more reliable. Can't get any simpler than carbs. What bugs me the most is having to carry a heavy battery for FI. I just hate to mess with batteries tending and dying. In fact, my street bike just came back from the shop after the second battery died in less than 3 months. Battery can be expensive. Shop hourly rate for diagnose is even more. Dead battery on FI equals dead bike. Battery can go bad just by sitting on the shelf. Carb can sit on the shelf forever and not go bad.

Your battery must be being drained by something or cheap batteries? I just replaced mine and its 4 years old and my bike sits in a freezing storage shed in the winter.

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More simple equals more reliable. Can't get any simpler than carbs. What bugs me the most is having to carry a heavy battery for FI. I just hate to mess with batteries tending and dying. In fact, my street bike just came back from the shop after the second battery died in less than 3 months. Battery can be expensive. Shop hourly rate for diagnose is even more. Dead battery on FI equals dead bike. Battery can go bad just by sitting on the shelf. Carb can sit on the shelf forever and not go bad.
Only electric-start bikes have batteries. None of the kick-start-only EFI MX bikes has a battery.

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This is EXACTLY the same as cars. When carburetors were common, they were the thing to go for. When fuel injection first came out, they had all kinds of issues and nobody really saw them as being the future. Nowadays there are no more vehicles manufactured with carburetors. FI offers better reliability, a larger range of running temperatures, and a very fine control of the stoichiometric values.

Give FI technology in bikes a few years for them to develop and fine tune them. IMO they need temperature sensors on the intake, in the coolant, as well as an O2 sensor on the exhaust for the FI to work as well as it does with cars.

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This is EXACTLY the same as cars. When carburetors were common, they were the thing to go for. When fuel injection first came out, they had all kinds of issues and nobody really saw them as being the future. Nowadays there are no more vehicles manufactured with carburetors. FI offers better reliability, a larger range of running temperatures, and a very fine control of the stoichiometric values.

Give FI technology in bikes a few years for them to develop and fine tune them. IMO they need temperature sensors on the intake, in the coolant, as well as an O2 sensor on the exhaust for the FI to work as well as it does with cars.

Most systems that I have seen have everything you mentioned except for the o2 sensors. There are fuel controlling piggy back systems (ex, power commander) that can give you the added option of using an O2 sensor.

IMO The only thing that needs fine tuning on F.I. bikes is the fuel map. Stock software to adjust the map is very limited (at least yammy is), but using a fuel controller can make improved power over the entire band, in much finer more accurate increments.

Adding an o2 sensor can really help in maintaining the perfect air fuel ratio for the engine no matter what the running conditions. You can get almost the same thing by bringing your bike and fuel controller to a dyno shop (a decent fuel controller like the PCV not stock controllers) and have them tune it through multiple runs, using multiple load points in the power band. If you always keep your filter clean than the target AFR's can be achieved...

In the end it may cost you less to get the o2 sensor add on and have the fuel controller track AFR's all the time, and when you get home and upload your controller, you can see the changes it wants to make, and then have it do so....

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I currently have both systems (07 KX & 10 FX) and what I love is not having to adjust my fuel and leak jet as I climb in elevation (or rejetting). Some of my favorite rides take me from 2500 ft to 6500 ft in less than an hour and the EFI could care less.:)

Yes there is a learning curve, but no different than when I bought my first 4stroke. And yes, there's still room for improvement, but as someone else has already stated - it's the future for dirt bikes, even the 2 strokes will be fuel injected. Don't say it's impossible, because everything on the modern dirt bike was "impossible" just a few years ago.:lol:

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This is EXACTLY the same as cars. When carburetors were common, they were the thing to go for. When fuel injection first came out, they had all kinds of issues and nobody really saw them as being the future. Nowadays there are no more vehicles manufactured with carburetors. FI offers better reliability, a larger range of running temperatures, and a very fine control of the stoichiometric values.

Give FI technology in bikes a few years for them to develop and fine tune them. IMO they need temperature sensors on the intake, in the coolant, as well as an O2 sensor on the exhaust for the FI to work as well as it does with cars.

Only if you are talking about Lambos and Ferraris, and even they dont' make as much power per cc as a modern MX bike. The FI systems on the MX bikes are a long way from being reliable. Carbs don't break, they fail from neglect. All FI systems in MX bikes (not quads!) are relatively new, fragile, heavy, and have a short life. This will change over the next few years. The KX450 seems to have the best track record so far for an MX FI system; even though 'they are all the same', they are not. Kawi for example specs different materials in their injector body, and different metal plating on their injectors and pumps.

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I think it's the dirty, rough and tumble world of dirt bikes that is giving the manufacturers the most problems. EFI is flawless on sport bikes (wanna talk about HP per cc :lol:), but it is a smoother life on the street by far than with an MX or woods bike. They'll get it down in time, still in the Beta testing stage now.

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