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my buddy has an 07 and has had lots of problems with it. He has had several people and shops look at it and no one seems to be able to fix it.

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my buddy has an 07 and has had lots of problems with it. He has had several people and shops look at it and no one seems to be able to fix it.

We can fix it from here.

Seriously.

If you describe the symptoms correctly, it can be fixed, unless of course, the choke or hotstart are corroded into the body, or you have broken something on the body.

Buying a used carb is risky business, and will probably require the same attention as the one you already have, to solve your problem.

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Krannie's right we can help you. There's a lot of experience here and chances are, we have seen your problems before. And if that's not in your mechanical range. Send me a PM and I can rebuild it for you.:lol:

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What they said ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Plus, if you did break something off the body internally, it still could work (ask me how I know!) with some modifications

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Here's a good place to start:

Clean the Main, Idle and Pilot Jets

Hold each jet up to the light and see if you can look through it. The idle and/or pilot jets have extremely small holes so make sure you are looking through them straight. If you can see through the jet it isn’t clogged. There could be a little gunk built up around the edges so spray them down with carb cleaner and let them sit a bit.

If you can’t see through the jet it is clogged and needs to be cleaned. Always try the easiest things first. Here’s an ordered list of a few things you can do to clean the jet.

Blow through it. - Rarely works, but hey, who knows.

Compressed air. - Force 100 pounds into it. Works occassionally. Make sure to hold the jet tightly so it doesn’t go flying across the garage. You might put the jet back into the carb body to hold it in place for this.

Soak it in cleaner. - When I first started cleaning carbs I thought carb cleaner would be the magic answer. It isn’t. In fact, I hardly ever use carb cleaner any more, because it simply doesn’t do a very good job of anything but removing varnish from the bowl and slide. But try this.

Poking it through. - Collect a few different diameters of needle like objects. A wire from a steel bristle brush works well, a bristle from a broom works well, a baby pin, small sewing needle, etc. Very gently try to poke it through the jet. If you are using a metal needle use caution, brass jets can scratch and deform easily.

Boiling! - This works better than anything. Toss the jets into a pot of boiling water and let them bounce around for a couple minutes. When you pull them out blow some compressed air through them and you’ll most likely be good to go.

Some idle jets can be real tricky and never seem like they’ll be cleaned out . . . Just keep working at it, I’ve never met a jet that couldn’t be cleaned.

Cleaning the Choke and Air Mixture Screw

Air mixture screws have a tendency to strip or break. If the carbs were real gummed up you might find that the air screws are stuck. Don’t force them, if they don’t want to come out, just leave them for now. It is fairly rare that these screws will need to be cleaned because they are above the float level. If you can get them out just wipe them down with carb cleaner and spray some through the jet.

Cleaning the Slide and Needle

These are easy to clean. Squirt them with a bit of carb cleaner, wd-40, or anything similar, then wipe them down with a rag. Once the varnish is gone they’re good to go. Sometimes they get heavy varnish on them which I will scratch off carefully with a piece of plastic. Scratching the slide and needle is a BAD thing, use caution.

Cleaning the Carb Bodies

Use the same squirt and wipe method noted above. Most of the time the other pressed jets and passages in the carburetors won’t be clogged. But if the bike has been sitting a real long time with squirrels in the airbox it is certainly possible. Us a compressor to blow some air into every passage you can see. Listen for the air coming out the other side. If no air compressor is available use a can of WD-40 with a straw attachment.

If some of the pressed jets are clogged it can be difficult to open them up. There are a few things you can do.

Carb Dip - Most autoparts stores sell carb dip. It comes in a can similar to a paint can and is a VERY harsh cleaning agent. Soak the entire carbs in this dip. This dip can eat at rubber and plastics if they are submerged for too long, so try and remove everything you can from the carb bodies before soaking them. Once you pull them out swish the carbs around in a bucket of water to clean off the excess dip, then hose them down with WD-40 to get rid of the water.

Boiling in Water - Not many people do this but it is by far the best way of cleaning carburetors. Dropping the carbs into a pot of boiling water will instantly free up stuck slides, throttle plates, and other frozen parts. It will also loosen the dirt and grime clogging up pressed jets and other passages. Just make sure to dry the carbs thoroughly with compressed air or the sun afterwards.

Boiling in Lemon Juice - There is NOTHING BETTER at cleaning carbs than a giant pot of boiling lemon juice. The acidity from the lemons eats through everything; gas varnish, oil build up, dirt, grime, etc. Sometimes I won’t even bother doing anything but this - I’ll just remove the bowls, remove the caps, then drop everything into the pot and let it sit for 20 minutes (rotate them a few times). The one caveat to doing this is that you’ll want to wash the lemon juice off the carbs as soon as you pull them out. So have a bucket of water ready, or a can of WD-40 to hose them down. Also note that the acidity has a tendency to put a dull finish on the aluminum bodies of the carbs. This isn’t a problem in most cases, but if you must have everything shiny be prepared to do a little scrubbing and polishing afterwards. It may sound weird, but trust me, I just saved you LOTS of time. (Most dollar stores sell 1/2 gallon jugs of lemon juice, so buying a few gallons will only cost you $6. Plus you can put it back into the bottles afterwards and save it for next time.)

Cleaning the Bowls

This is pretty straight forward. Use any of the methods above to tranform your varnished bowls.

Most carb bowls are simple, just clean them up and they are good to go. This is for the leak and pilot jets and are extremely important. If these passages are clogged, the bike won’t stay running, period. Use the same poke, soak, and boiling methods outlined elsewhere in this article. Not all bowls have these passages, only some, if your’s don’t - good for you!

Once Everything is Clean

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The problem is that when he turns the gas on it fills up the carb and runs gas out of the overflow tube and won't stop. The float has been adjusted and it fixed it but in a small amount of time it started doing the same thing. If you take the bowl off and lift up on the bowl it will stop the flow and you don't have to apply alot of pressure.

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The problem is that when he turns the gas on it fills up the carb and runs gas out of the overflow tube and won't stop. The float has been adjusted and it fixed it but in a small amount of time it started doing the same thing. If you take the bowl off and lift up on the bowl it will stop the flow and you don't have to apply alot of pressure.

Rubber tip on the float valve is shot. Replace the valve and clean the seat well with a Q-Tip and carb cleaner.

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The problem is that when he turns the gas on it fills up the carb and runs gas out of the overflow tube and won't stop. The float has been adjusted and it fixed it but in a small amount of time it started doing the same thing. If you take the bowl off and lift up on the bowl it will stop the flow and you don't have to apply alot of pressure.

Also check to make sure that there's not anything stuck up in the chamber that could stop the float valve from seating correctly. You could also adjust the float to seat at a lower level by bending the tab.

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Or the plastic float quits "floating"? Simple way to check is take them off and put them in a cup of gas, hold them down a bit, and see if they quit being bouyant because they fill with gas. it really is a simple system and only thing that would require a carb replacement is if there is a crack or something in the carb that lets fuel trickle in somewhere other than the needle/seat controled by the floats.

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Not sure about the x carb but most of the newer carbs that Honda is buying the brass part that the float needle seats into is not replaceable. If it was damaged so the needle can not seat you may need a carb.

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it's rare the seat goes, the rubber on the needle goes first

why the shop and others did not point out these causes to you I have no idea, it's carb/float 101

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Just looked at parts list and the brass part of the seat was not listed. You might try a new needle before you buy a carb even if it's been replaced before.

Good Luck.

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