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EFI Fuel Filters - How many hours before change out?

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Hello - Purchased my first Husaberg/ EFI system just a short time ago. (Awesome!) Would like to continue to educate myself about proper EFI maintenance.

My question is this: How many average hours before you should really change the fuel filters in system?

I'd like real world experience, as we all know that service manuals are very cautious with recommendations. At just under $70 bucks a kit, I'd like to maximize my usage.

Any info is much appreciated. - Thank you:ride:

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I put a KTM sock in the fuel cap opening for starters.

My dealer knows the people from the Dutch enduro teams close. Team instructions from KTM:

- KTM 350 enduro riders have to clean filter each day and add certain substance to fuel when they are abroad

- Husaberg enduro riders should NOT use the KTM in-line filter. No further instructions (do nothing)

To summarize, I think we are quite safe, unless we start riding in countries with lots of ethanol in the fuel. Not even cars are safe in countries where they do that (Germany, Sweden, France and Spain with E10 or E85 fuel).

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The stock paper in tank filter that comes on the 'Bergs is a sad joke. The injector can and will plug if you run it stock.

Add this Can-Am quad filter in place of the quick disconnect under your tank and head off any potential fuel filtration problems. Put one of these on my bike before I even rode it. No problems to date. Other fuel filters may work, but this one has been proven on a lot of 'Bergs around the world on the Unoffical Husaberg.org and KTM Talk / Berg boards :bonk:

I change it once a year. For $14, it is cheap insurance. Made in the USA too :banana:

http://www.parkeryamaha.com/bombardierfuelfilteroutlanders.aspx

Installed on my bike, complete with Redneck Engineering cushioning system :smirk: The cam chain tensioner is a DJH manual job. Not much to go wrong with a screw and locknut, so that appeals to me.

DJH.jpg

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I've been lurking around this forum for a while now. I am VERY much considering picking up a FE450 this spring.

But after reading all these post about bad fuel pumps and useless filters I'm starting to reconsider.

I know there is no such thing as a perfectly enginered dirtbike but for what the bergs cost compared the other comparable bike out there, its like what the hell.

I can't see spending over 8000 clams on a bike, KNOWING parts of the fuel system will fail in the very near future.

I will still end up buying one but again, what the hell? for that much money that basic stuff should have been figured out before it hit the dealerships.

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+1 on the Drunk4ever post with Can Am filter. Works great. I also filter my fuel in a can with a fine mesh screen on the spout because I don't have the "fuel sock" or whatever it's called. But between clean fuel in and the CanAm filter you should be good to rock on. Well after you heat shield the tank and update the fuel pump if older bike and wrap the mid pipe...

OK they need some basic setup but then they kick butt.

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Filtering the fuel prior to filling the tank or as you fill the tank (with the sock filter) is a good thing, but it isn't sufficient by itself. Those filters are coarse, as is the filter on the intake to the fuel pump. Their job is to protect the pump.

You also need good filtering after the pump - in the high-pressure fuel line. This is where you install a very fine filter to protect the injector. You need the high pressure of the pump to force the fuel through these really fine grain filters.

Adding an extra filter such as the CanAm in the fuel line adds extra protection. If you are a desert racer, I would definitely recommend it. If you are a recreational rider (like me), I think you can live without it. Basically a personal decision.

I installed the KTM in-line filter and it caused me trouble within just a few hours of riding. Apparently they get hot and close off, restricting the fuel flow, causing your bike to run lean and hot. Do not use them.

Some bikes were manufactured with a low quality fuel pump that may fail. The most common symptom (based on my forum snooping and my own experience) is that the pump won't spin when you try to start the bike when it is hot. Taking precautions to minimize heat transfer into the tank is a good thing. As far as I know, the replacement pump (which I assume is in newer models) is pretty reliable. Other manufacturers that used the same cheap pump also had problems.

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DaveBerg - getting back to your original question. Here is the only data I have seen regarding changing the in-tank fuel filter. JRDoz posts some pictures of his dirty filter after 1000 km (621 miles). Clearly the filter needs to be replaced periodically, but I don't know how often.

http://ktmtalk.com/index.php?showtopic=415338&hl=fuel%20filter&st=60

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I would think your filter is in the tank with the pump, like my Husky, I replaced the cheap pump and the cheap filter with better components (total cost, under $180), I have 6000 miles now and no problems whatsoever. I also used the $30 a foot submersible fuel line, and it is staying soft and pliable inside the tank. The first pic below show the cheap plastic filter, the 2nd pic shows my installation, with a small metal filter from AutoZone, with the correct nipple sizes I needed.

I haven't changed the filter in 6000 miles.

HuskyFuelPump3.jpg

HuskyWithDucatiFuelPump1.jpg

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I would think your filter is in the tank with the pump, like my Husky, I replaced the cheap pump and the cheap filter with better components (total cost, under $180), I have 6000 miles now and no problems whatsoever. I also used the $30 a foot submersible fuel line, and it is staying soft and pliable inside the tank. The first pic below show the cheap plastic filter, the 2nd pic shows my installation, with a small metal filter from AutoZone, with the correct nipple sizes I needed.

I haven't changed the filter in 6000 miles.

HuskyFuelPump3.jpg

HuskyWithDucatiFuelPump1.jpg

Looks as if a lot more than a filter was changed. ???

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Looks as if a lot more than a filter was changed. ???

Yeah, my post said the fuel pump was changed, my stock 30mm crapped out, gummed up from sitting for many months before I bought the bike. Husky wanted $500 for a complete fuel pump assembly, I bought the 38mm Ducati pump from CAcycle, I ditched the plastic carrier/holster, and installed a piece of threaded stock, covered that with submersible hose, and zip tied the larger pump to the rod. It's been 100% effective, no problems.

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Nice work Huskyrider.

Reminds me of my old '97 Suzuki TL1000. The fuel pump crapped out on that after 30,000 miles, Suz wanted $400. Used a $40 Airtech pump off a Dodge Caravan on that bike :smirk: Fit right in place, worked fine, even if it sounded like a coffee grinder at startup.

The 'Berg setup is not as friendly for swapping pumps as they do have to fit inside a plastic sleeve. Ironically, CA Cycle sells a pump meant for the new Husky that is $180 and it fits the 'Bergs perfectly. These 'Bergs (and the new FI KTMs that sprang forth from them) are cool bikes. Don't let a few niggles with the fuel system put you off.

Mine has not missed a beat to date. :bonk: I think it helps not to run them too low on fuel. The gas gets hot when there is little in the tank, and it is more likely to suck crap into the pump. I have the 70 Degree Racing tank on mine, it generally has at least half a gallon in it, even at the end of a very long ride. The FI is pretty fuel efficient (40 mpg or so, off road).

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Yeah, my post said the fuel pump was changed, my stock 30mm crapped out, gummed up from sitting for many months before I bought the bike. Husky wanted $500 for a complete fuel pump assembly, I bought the 38mm Ducati pump from CAcycle, I ditched the plastic carrier/holster, and installed a piece of threaded stock, covered that with submersible hose, and zip tied the larger pump to the rod. It's been 100% effective, no problems.

Thanks.

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The 'Berg setup is not as friendly for swapping pumps as they do have to fit inside a plastic sleeve. Ironically, CA Cycle sells a pump meant for the new Husky that is $180 and it fits the 'Bergs perfectly. These 'Bergs (and the new FI KTMs that sprang forth from them) are cool bikes. Don't let a few niggles with the fuel system put you off.

Mine has not missed a beat to date. :bonk: I think it helps not to run them too low on fuel. The gas gets hot when there is little in the tank, and it is more likely to suck crap into the pump. I have the 70 Degree Racing tank on mine, it generally has at least half a gallon in it, even at the end of a very long ride. The FI is pretty fuel efficient (40 mpg or so, off road).

Yeah, they did not make this 30mm pump when I needed mine, in fact, we believe our search for a 30mm pump caused them to source this pump from their Chinese suppliers, I found the traders on the product and it costs $7 apiece on a pallet of 500. This pump also fits the Yamaha WR250R. The 38mm pump I have is much more robust and heavy duty although the 30mm lightweight will last a long time if kept clean. On Huskys, there was a problem with the pump riding up out of the holster and then away from the pre-filter sock and then plastic from the tank getting sucked up into the filter, causing the pump to slowly die.

fp-hus_main_1.jpg

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Interesting Huskyrider!

Too bad the 'Berg mounting setup is not like you have on your bike, which is much like I had on my TL1000. With some creative mods, a more robust pump can be adapted. I would love to be able to run the bigger pump on my 'Berg. Oh well. Running the filter sock to protect the pump and of course the Can-Am filter to protect the injector. To date the little made in China pump on the 'Berg keeps working. As for the WR250R, I have not heard about pump issues with those bikes. Maybe they have as better filter at the pump. The 'Berg one is pretty small.

Bottom line is FI is worth it for me. Here in Colorado, I can ride from 5,500 to over 13,000 feet. It rocks to have the bike respond perfectly and solid to the throttle no matter where I find myself :bonk:

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Bottom line is FI is worth it for me. Here in Colorado, I can ride from 5,500 to over 13,000 feet. It rocks to have the bike respond perfectly and solid to the throttle no matter where I find myself :bonk:

Yes, for sure, I have had mine from 800 feet to 10,000 feet and not a hiccup at all.

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I ride my KTM 525 regularly up to 13,000 ft. in Colorado and down to sea level in Baja and it never requires more than a 1/2 turn of the exposed, easily reachable with a glove on, fuel screw to run perfectly.

My Husaberg on the other hand, clogged a fuel injector 10 miles from the finish of the Tecate enduro last year, totally negating 90 miles of hard racing, 3000 mi. of round trip driving and ruining a planned day after race trail ride. Had to stop at the Berg dealer on the way home for a diagnosis, reflash of the computer and to change the injector, to the tune of $400. In 33 years of riding, I've never taken a bike to a shop to be fixed before :bonk: Now it has a dead fuel pump.

Oh yeah......the KTM is lighter, has better power, out handles the berg hands down, doesn't require fuel straining, has a kickstarter and isn't like working on a car.

Yea.....I'm being negative in the Berg forum, but it often seems there's a lot of brushing aside major issues (in all brand forums) for the sake of telling others it's ok to join the group. Like getting married, then trying to talk your friends into getting married so you can be couples friends, when really, you're jealous of their singleness.

As for me......carbs and kickstarters forever :smirk:

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I ride my KTM 525 regularly up to 13,000 ft. in Colorado and down to sea level in Baja and it never requires more than a 1/2 turn of the exposed, easily reachable with a glove on, fuel screw to run perfectly.

My Husaberg on the other hand, clogged a fuel injector 10 miles from the finish of the Tecate enduro last year, totally negating 90 miles of hard racing, 3000 mi. of round trip driving and ruining a planned day after race trail ride. Had to stop at the Berg dealer on the way home for a diagnosis, reflash of the computer and to change the injector, to the tune of $400. In 33 years of riding, I've never taken a bike to a shop to be fixed before :bonk: Now it has a dead fuel pump.

Oh yeah......the KTM is lighter, has better power, out handles the berg hands down, doesn't require fuel straining, has a kickstarter and isn't like working on a car.

Yea.....I'm being negative in the Berg forum, but it often seems there's a lot of brushing aside major issues (in all brand forums) for the sake of telling others it's ok to join the group. Like getting married, then trying to talk your friends into getting married so you can be couples friends, when really, you're jealous of their singleness.

As for me......carbs and kickstarters forever :smirk:

Well said:smirk:

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VERY well said. I called BS already in this post.

I'm still on the fence on buying a Berg this spring because of all the BS fuel problems. Again, I think for what they cost it is NUTS to have these problems. Hasn't fuel injection been around sense like the 60's? Cannondale was I believe one of the first to inject a 4 wheeler YEARS ago, and there a bicycle company for Christ sake and they figured it out, what the hell is Husabergs problem.

I've heard the other Jap 450's are a little finicky with fuel contamination but nothing like KNOWINGLY having to change the entire fuel system in the first 40 hours of use.

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I thank everyone that gave useful information pertaining to my question.

Some friendly advice to the others:

1. If you feel it's so much BS that you felt it necessary to repeat yourself, don't buy one.

2. The only evidence of jealousy is someone posting on a competitor’s forum and making comments about a bike they don't even own and technology they may be afraid of.

Advancing technology always has a learning curve with durability growing pains. I for one, am excited to be a part of this new level of performance and looking forward to expanding my knowledge.

I'm sure there was some who felt the wheel was a bunch of BS, after all, it would require something to pull the cart. And that's just BS!

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