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06 wr250 servicing

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sorry if this is a silly question.

im having trouble finding a clear answer on how often to service my wr. i bought it a few months ago and im loving it being doing tracks and trails including woods and beach. i had it serviced in a shop when i got it and figure i can do it from now on. just wondering what you guys think about hours between servicing. and when to change what or is it a case of doing the oil plug and filter together

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Well, the standard for runing the oil and filter for YZ and WR Fs is 5-8 hrs of run time. Anything longer, and you get wear in unwanted places. The spark plug, I change once a year whether it needs it or not. Air filter, yes you need to service it often too, but that depends on how dusty the conditions are that you run it. I go 10 hours plus, I run a dual element of Twin Air and a Flo on top of that. I've had good luck with that setup. Suspension linkage needs to be serviced every 6 months, and other bearings need to be serviced like the wheel bearings, steering head.... cables..... Good luck

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You'll get numerous different answers to this.

Basically, I believe it's better to service the bike more often than needed instead of not often enough.

In my opinion:

Engine oil and oil filter.

Don't kid yourself.

If you're racking-up the miles every weekend, change it a couple times a month.

If the bike goes for a swim, change it as soon as possible.

If you ride it only occasionally, every 500 miles or once a year, whatever comes first.

If I knew I'd be letting the bike sit for a long period after a ride, I'd change it before I let the bike sit (as well as drain the carb and fuel tank).

Myself, I change mine about every 300 miles (which is plenty of off-road trail use around here), which is a bit overkill, but, better sooner than later in my opinion.

Air filter.

Just as important as engine oil, and many riders ignore this.

For me, it's before every ride.

Every ride.

Every ride.

Use a solvent that cuts through the oil and won't leave an oily film behind.

Washing the filter in luke-warm soapy water after that ain't a bad idea.

Allow the filter to completely 100% dry.

Do not use a filter that's got tears or any kind of damage.

Use a top quality, honest-to-gosh foam filter oil, not engine oil, bar and chain oil, hypoid gear oil, Pam cooking spray, Wesson corn oil, or K&N gauze filter oil.

Myself, I'll only use Maxima FFT as I believe it's the best one available, period.

Chassis bearings.

The steering head gets greased every six months.

The suspension bearings get it every two or three months, depending on how much I rode the bike and how sloppy the terrain was during that time period.

Don't forget to grease the bolts, collars, every seal, and the swingarm pivot shaft, as they rely on a film of grease to seal out crud and moisture and to last long.

Clean and grease the wheel axles, wheel bearing seals, wheel spacers, and the inside bores of the spacers going through the wheels.

These also rely on a film of grease that's reasonably fresh in order to survive.

If you've ever bought a used bike and saw signs of rust in there, you know this was never done.

If you know a buddy that has to pound out a wheel axle or swingarm pivot shaft with a 50lb. hammer, you know this was never done.

Again, don't kid yourself - if you're riding the swamps 24/7, do this more often.

The Service Manual is worth it's weight in gold for doing this yourself, and use the torque specs shown to not only prevent over-torquing, but also under-torquing, as the chassis bearings require the correct tension, especially the steering head.

Control cables.

I lube my clutch cable before every ride, as I can easily tell the difference after it's been lubed.

I lube the throttle cables a couple of times a year.

I use good ol' Bel-Ray 6-in-1.

I put a dab of grease on the clutch cable end that hooks to the clutch lever.

Don't neglect the area where the throttle grip rotates over the handlebar.

I use a thin film of engine oil on that area, and a thin film of grease on the inside of the metal throttle housing where it contacts the throttle grip.

Dirt bikes are, after all, performance machines made to enjoy the power and light weight and have fun with.

They're not intended to go 100,000 miles without any kind of a service.

On the other hand, you don't have to be paranoid, either.

Just use your head and don't be lazy or try to kid yourself.

I know guys who, on one hand, like to remind me they work on high-tech equipment for a living, and yet they never touch the air filter or chassis bearings of their dirt bike because, "...it's only a 2007 model, for Christ's sake..." :lol:

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you are both total legends lads, thanks a million. heading to the shed this minute. id rather strip the thing every night than let it be distroyed due to lazyness. its being a great bike since i got it and is leading my slow ass around and over everything while telling me to wind the trottle so she earns a good home.

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You'll get numerous different answers to this.

Basically, I believe it's better to service the bike more often than needed instead of not often enough.

In my opinion:

Engine oil and oil filter.

Don't kid yourself.

If you're racking-up the miles every weekend, change it a couple times a month.

If the bike goes for a swim, change it as soon as possible.

If you ride it only occasionally, every 500 miles or once a year, whatever comes first.

If I knew I'd be letting the bike sit for a long period after a ride, I'd change it before I let the bike sit (as well as drain the carb and fuel tank).

Myself, I change mine about every 300 miles (which is plenty of off-road trail use around here), which is a bit overkill, but, better sooner than later in my opinion.

Air filter.

Just as important as engine oil, and many riders ignore this.

For me, it's before every ride.

Every ride.

Every ride.

Use a solvent that cuts through the oil and won't leave an oily film behind.

Washing the filter in luke-warm soapy water after that ain't a bad idea.

Allow the filter to completely 100% dry.

Do not use a filter that's got tears or any kind of damage.

Use a top quality, honest-to-gosh foam filter oil, not engine oil, bar and chain oil, hypoid gear oil, Pam cooking spray, Wesson corn oil, or K&N gauze filter oil.

Myself, I'll only use Maxima FFT as I believe it's the best one available, period.

Chassis bearings.

The steering head gets greased every six months.

The suspension bearings get it every two or three months, depending on how much I rode the bike and how sloppy the terrain was during that time period.

Don't forget to grease the bolts, collars, every seal, and the swingarm pivot shaft, as they rely on a film of grease to seal out crud and moisture and to last long.

Clean and grease the wheel axles, wheel bearing seals, wheel spacers, and the inside bores of the spacers going through the wheels.

These also rely on a film of grease that's reasonably fresh in order to survive.

If you've ever bought a used bike and saw signs of rust in there, you know this was never done.

If you know a buddy that has to pound out a wheel axle or swingarm pivot shaft with a 50lb. hammer, you know this was never done.

Again, don't kid yourself - if you're riding the swamps 24/7, do this more often.

The Service Manual is worth it's weight in gold for doing this yourself, and use the torque specs shown to not only prevent over-torquing, but also under-torquing, as the chassis bearings require the correct tension, especially the steering head.

Control cables.

I lube my clutch cable before every ride, as I can easily tell the difference after it's been lubed.

I lube the throttle cables a couple of times a year.

I use good ol' Bel-Ray 6-in-1.

I put a dab of grease on the clutch cable end that hooks to the clutch lever.

Don't neglect the area where the throttle grip rotates over the handlebar.

I use a thin film of engine oil on that area, and a thin film of grease on the inside of the metal throttle housing where it contacts the throttle grip.

Dirt bikes are, after all, performance machines made to enjoy the power and light weight and have fun with.

They're not intended to go 100,000 miles without any kind of a service.

On the other hand, you don't have to be paranoid, either.

Just use your head and don't be lazy or try to kid yourself.

I know guys who, on one hand, like to remind me they work on high-tech equipment for a living, and yet they never touch the air filter or chassis bearings of their dirt bike because, "...it's only a 2007 model, for Christ's sake..." :)

Nice post!:lol::thumbsup:

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