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How to Preload and Seat Bounce?

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Hi Guys

I am a little confused on preloading and seat bouncing. When seat bouncing, do you stand up right before your rear wheel leaves the ramp, or right after it leaves the ramp? And for Preloading, do you push down while on the middle of the jump, or near the lip of the jump?

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Preloading is done on a more regular basis then seat bouncing.

Most of the time preloading is done standing and pushing your whole body into the bike as you take off from the jump. By doing that, you actually shift your weight into the suspension, preloading it, so you can get a little bit more boost off the jump face.

You would seat bounce over a jump that you don't have enough speed, run-up room to clear naturally. The goal is to basically sit on the seat quickly right as the bike leaves the lip of the jump face. That will load up the suspension even more then preloading and when the tension of the spring releases, it will literally shoot you up in the air. This works for pro's, but its a skill that unless you practice a lot, can freak riders out because it shoots you so far up in the air. Most of the tracks we normal people ride, don't need seat bouncing. But the designers of the MX/SX professional tracks put in obstacles that need to be seat bounced in order to triple or quad for instance. Most jumps can be doubled without seat bouncing, just with the typical preloading.

If you watch a supercross race, you will see the difference between preloading and seat bouncing. When the rider physically sits on the seat on the take-off, thats a seat bounce, if they're standing, they're probably preloading.

I do a lot of preloading when riding my 125SX, its just how you ride the bike. Though I will admit, I do seat bounce a lot as well, when I can't build the drive and over simple small stuff, not big stuff.

Edited by tye1138

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Preloading is done on a more regular basis then seat bouncing.

Most of the time preloading is done standing and pushing your whole body into the bike as you take off from the jump. By doing that, you actually shift your weight into the suspension, preloading it, so you can get a little bit more boost off the jump face.

You would seat bounce over a jump that you don't have enough speed, run-up room to clear naturally. The goal is to basically put some of your weight on the seat right after you take off from the ramp, basically bouncing on the seat. That will load up the suspension even more then preloading and when the tension of the spring releases, it will literally shoot you up in the air. This works for pro's, but its a skill that unless you practice a lot, can freak riders out because it shoots you so far up in the air. Most of the tracks we normal people ride, don't need seat bouncing. But the designers of the MX/SX professional tracks put in obstacles that need to be seat bounced in order to triple or quad for instance. Most jumps can be doubled without seat bouncing, just with the typical preloading.

If you watch a supercross race, you will see the difference between preloading and seat bouncing. When the rider physically sits on the seat on the take-off, thats a seat bounce, if they're standing, they're probably preloading.

I do a lot of preloading when riding my 125SX, its just how you ride the bike. Though I will admit, I do seat bounce a lot as well, when I can't build the drive and over simple small stuff, not big stuff.

Wow man, Thanks for clearing that up. For some reason ur always there right when I need ya!:lol:

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"The goal is to basically put some of your weight on the seat right after you take off from the ramp..."

I think you meant "before you take off".

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Dont worry about when to stand up... When you seat bounce, it will be done for you.

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Dont worry about when to stand up... When you seat bounce, it will be done for you.

Sometimes, but not all the time. I've seat bounced stuff and it NOT throw me up off the seat. It sure is nice when it does toss ya up though!

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It's fairly easy to do. Find a long mellow table that shoots you out and less up. Try it there and the difference should be obvious as it will more drastically adjust the path you take, and also be lower consequence should you mess up.

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When you seat bounce you sit all the way off the jump, stand once you're in the air. Seat bouncing is a good technique to use when you’re approach into a jump is short and you need more height and/or distance and/or don’t have enough time to stand up for the jump. Since you’re sitting on the seat your body weight is going to go straight into the bike and therefore compress the rear suspension more, causing it to rebound harder and give you more lift (airtime) out of the jump. If you were standing your legs could absorb some of the compression and rebound, keeping you lower. When seat bouncing clutch and throttle control are very important and usually pulling back on the bars at the right time is also important for these two things are what control whether your front end is high or low. You see, you have to deliver the power to the rear wheel just right with the clutch and throttle as that rear wheel compresses into the jump and rebounds out of the jump. This is an advanced technique and even then can only be used on short approaches where you’re accelerating all the way through the compression part of the jump. The jump face also has to be smooth with no kickers in it.

When you preload a jump you spike your weight (kind of jump your weight) into the footpegs as the bike compresses into the jump. Then you jump your weight out of the footpegs as it rebounds from the jump and there you have more height and distance.

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