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Does winning make MX less fun?

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This past season my son who is 9 started to win consistently on our local circuit as well as some other ones...This was after 2 previous years of 65 racing without a podium until this spring...

As many of you can likely attest there seems to be a point where certain kids just "get it" and all of the mechanics, mindset and confidence meet and they become much better riders. This happened for my 9 year old in June and after that point he started to get better every race it seemed.

It seems to become about winning more than about having fun although that is not to say it is no longer fun for him because it is but expectations are certainly different and even now in the off season the planning has already started in his mind on how to compete in the faster 65 10-11 class...

Any suggestions on keeping a 10 year old grounded in this sport?

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well, he probably enjoyed his season of wins, my son had one of those as well his second year of racing, of course, you move up in bike size, or to the next level and it's a whole new ballgame. If your son only loves winning, he will have a hard road ahead of himself. Somehow, I think that won't be the case.

My son loved all the wins he got that year, but all in all, he's always loved the sport more than how he placed. The last couple of years, he was the young one in the 85A class and this brought a whole new set of challenges which he attacked with full enthusiasm, last season he broke both arms first ride and missed 1/3rd of the races, he did manage to get 9th overall, this season he placed 4th overall with an injury free season. To this day, he loves the competition, but he loves free riding even more, he's ALWAYS out there bettering himself lap after lap.

Some of the most memorable races of his life won't be when he placed first, but will be when he had an all out epic 15 minute battle from start to finish with a fellow racer, just ask my kid - that's what RACING is all about for him, it's the battle, not the ability to walk away from everyone with ease, because that gets old fast.

Oh, and to keep him grounded in this sport - that's easy, take him somewhere to race where the competition is fierce, even if it's just once, he'll get humbled real quick and realize he isn't the end all be all of this sport.

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winning is great, but remember its about fun. no matter how much you win, you are still a nobody in the sport. attend a few nationals and see if anyone remembers what place you finished or your name a year later.

keep riding and racing within perspective and everything will be fine.

in our house, school comes first bar none, then being a good person, if you cant do either then we dont ride. I dont care if you are first in your points season, you come home with a red, then you will not be racing that next race.

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winning is great, but remember its about fun. no matter how much you win, you are still a nobody in the sport. attend a few nationals and see if anyone remembers what place you finished or your name a year later.

keep riding and racing within perspective and everything will be fine.

in our house, school comes first bar none, then being a good person, if you cant do either then we dont ride. I dont care if you are first in your points season, you come home with a red, then you will not be racing that next race.

This.

Also, a old (i mean this guy is ancient) friend of mine last night on the phone said "winning is when you lap the guy in second place".

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Great points...thanks...

Perspective and reality are important to keep at the forefront....

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I'll bet there are alot of parents out there that wish there kids would find something in life that drives them to strive for prefection...

you have something great going with your youngster(IMO)

he has dedication and drive to do what ever it takes to be as good as he can be..he has goals..and it sounds like he realizes that he will need to be on the top of his game to reach his goals

i say CONGRATULATIONS!!! I hope he reaches his goals

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I think the most important thing is when he doesn't finish on the podium to give the same praise. When you start hitting bigger events, or change classes the wins are harder to come by. There is a big speed difference between kids on 65's to 85's. Let them know that you are proud of them. Some people put racing high on the priority list, and in reality it is the time spent together that makes racing so fun. My kid was winning a lot in the local 65jr class. We went to some bigger events, and started chasing competition. Needless to say those wins went away, but we still had a blast. Now that he is on a 85 in the jr class. Kids just got real fast. We are up there with them, but wow are they moving. It might be another year before we see a podium.

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Its all about the "journey" It is the same everytime she moves up to a bigger bike. Right when she starts railing its time to move on. Then you start at the bottom and work your way up again

I was really proud of Morgan when she decided on her own, it was time to move to Novice - even before she collected hardware for all her hard work. She said she was "sandbaggin" LOL

There is a local dude that has been killin everyone since the 65's. He would literally smoke the competition every week. It didn't look as fun as when dicing with someone his speed. He is now chasing nationals and is getting wayy better comp.

Remember, there is always someone faster.

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