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frustration.... maybe time to part company

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i own a 450r and a 450x. Mainly riding the x because of the easy button, but this year it seems everything is going wrong, and im just curious as to wether i need to expect this as routine wearout of parts, or just bad luck

The bike already has stainless valves installed mid last season, along with a new piston and rings. so far this season i am at 7000kms, but fed up, and thinking its time to swap to a cheaper bike to ride. and i rotate one of 3 air filters every ride, drop the oil every ride, and change the oil filter every other ride. chain is lubed at the end of every ride/cleaning, and bike is always left clean. i also go over it looking for loose or broken parts

here has been this years issues.

I seem to wear out a clutch basket every year.... so to start the year i bought a barnett with the stainless sleeves. at the same time i also changed the leak jet to a 50, and did a flex fuel screw, new chain and sprockets, and redid all the street legal wiring.

so instantly the bike wont start on the button, so i spend o month and a bunch of teardowns before i find out that the barnett is not machined correctly, and is actually contacting the sprocket for the one way bearing. during this time, i kept thinking it was something that i did to the carb, so i lost a month chasing this.

Clutch cable snapped during a ride, and ws a long way home... hydraulic clutch seems like a good idea after that one

finally swapped the basket for a new stocker, and the noise i thought i heard in the engine was gone, but still wouldnt estart. found out the one way bearing was seized in the housing it rides in, and it was all scored, probably from the barnett putting pressure on it. new one goes in, and it starts on the button again, but i should have swapped out the housing because it was scored also.

now my bike still has that low rpm bog when you wack the throttle that will almost send you over the bars, i have never gotten that one figured out.

I went through 2 chains, 2 rear sprockets, and am on my 5th front, and getting due for another

my rear brake pads are wearing on an angle, so i bought a new carrier, which helped the problem, but didnt fix it, they just go longer before wearing weird.

its now cold, and the thing takes half an hour to get going, kicking it again because the starter quit, going to check valves again, but it seems to flood right off the bat.

i have done both front and rear bearings in the wheels,and next that needs attention is linkage bearings.

I guess my main gripes are the clutch baskets, starting issues, and rear brakes. i counted 9 sets of rear brakes on the shelf from this year.

I love the bike when it works, just it is breaking the bank trying to keep it that way, so here is the questions...

are clutch baskets that fragile that i cant get a season out of it?

what am i missing with respect to the rear pads that makes them wear on an angle so that i dont get any life out of them

any ideas on the start issue? my 450r is 2 pumps of the throttle, pull choke and a couple kicks and your off, even in alot colder weather

is it just time to update to something newer,lighter,faster

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Sounds like you are very hard on clutches, drag your rear brake very badly, and do a lot of riding. It's hard to start because you put lots of miles on the motor, and you need to adjust / replace your valves.

If it takes more than 5 seconds to start the motor, with the right starting procedure, you have out of adjustment valves, assuming the carb is ok.

Has anyone every taught you how to install plates correctly (soak the fibers, sharp sides of metals down), or how to align your rear wheel (hash marks don't work, so your brake is probably dragging all of the time). If not, that could account for a lot of your premature wear.

Sounds like about 300 hours, which means major overhaul once or twice a year. If you do any of it on the street, you need to do maintenance more often, do to the constant rev issues.

I did not read any out of the ordinary issues for those conditions, other than your incorrect clutch issues.

These bikes only get about 100-150 hours before something needs maintenance, if you ride them hard. If you fall, well, then it's more often. I don't ride as hard as I did 3 years ago, but I ride more often, so every year I have to tear into the motor to check valves and piston wear.

If it were an R, you would be doing the same thing, only more often.

All FCR MX/CR carbs are essentially the same, so switching brands will not solve this.

My KX has never run correctly on chopped throttle, after several dozen attempts to solve it; I just run it a little lean on the bottom and ignore it.

I have broken (4) clutch bolts and gone through (2) clutch spring sets.

My WR has flat spots at 3k and 5k due to ignition issues from the factory.

Can't be removed without changing the ignition.

My X has always had slight hanging idle, ever since I added the R cam and porting. Nothing fixes it. It only bugs me on the street.

Sorry for all of your issues, but it sounds like you are ignoring the required set up and maintenance, and getting poor results because of it.

Five front sprockets and you didn't think that something was wrong with what you are doing with the chain??

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"... i rotate one of 3 air filters every ride, drop the oil every ride, and change the oil filter every other ride."

Just curious. How long is a "ride" (miles/hrs?)

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ride is usually 2-250 kms(150 miles) and out every weekend, alot of times both days.

not sure on the valves this time, because i havent taken it apart to check, thats todays project, but could be the issue.

the brakes, maybe im dragging them, no on purpose, i will keep that in mind

when i do the rear tire i put a wrench between the sprocket and chain and turn till its snug, then measure with digital calipers from the block to the back of the swingarm and make that distance the same, is that a correct way to do it?

I may be hard on clutch baskets, but not clutch plates. I have yet to every swap the clutch plates/fibers. I had them out last weekend,and they are still within fsm specs. and do know to put the sharp edge down. one thing i do notice is that the fsm makes a distinction for 2 of the fibers that are different. the clutch is what came with it when i bought it and all the fibers are the same. I dont slide the clutch, or clutch up wheelies and my r that i have had for 6+ years has never needed clutch plates either. maybe something else im doing wrong?

The biggest thing is i am comparing it to my r which is an 02, and i have had alot longer. it doesnt bog, doesnt wear the brake funny, and has been super reliable with kibblewhites,for 700 hrs, I did a piston and ring in it 20 hrs ago, and the valves still hadnt moved.

not trying to argue here, just elaborate to see if im doing something else wrong

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oh and the chain i measure center of pin half way back the swingarm while on a stand. 1 3/8 inches play from pushed down, to lifted up tight, correct?

and fuel mileage is good, usually getting 150kms(95miles) on a stock tank to dry

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oh and the chain i measure center of pin half way back the swingarm while on a stand. 1 3/8 inches play from pushed down, to lifted up tight, correct?

and fuel mileage is good, usually getting 150kms(95miles) on a stock tank to dry

My '09 manual says 1 - 1/4", so you may be too loose.

But really the proper way to check is to disconnect the shock and with a bike on the stand, get the rear wheel up to the maximum distance from the front sprocket. Deflection should be 1 - 3% of overall distance. Make up a gage block, then out it all back together.

Now with the block you can quickly check the free-play.

This is all covered in one of the FAQ/How to articles here on TT.

And I would be looking strongly at your back end; the chain and brake wear to me suggest that something is out of whack.

Jim.

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I am going to say a lot of your issues are self inflicted , no offense , but the X is a pretty much maintenance free bike if taken care of properly , at the risk of sounding redundant , i have a 06 , i am on the original clutch (plates and basket), original piston , rings , cables , and have had the same aluminum Renthal rear sprocket on the bike since late 06 , i did put Stainless intakes in at about 500 miles , and have not had to adjust them in 5 years , i change oil 2X a year (beginning of season , and at the end) , i change the oil filter every other season (after the engine was first broke in , as i changed every other ride till then) , i clean the air filter and airbox , when it looks dirty (i use a Pro-Seal gasket so i don't grease the filter edge or airbox seal , as that did not work , hence the stainless intakes, now the airbox tunnel stays clean), i lube the cables more or less depending on the conditions , if i am riding desert and sand , i lube it every few rides , if i am riding woods , i lube it once or twice a season

Your brake pad issue is from a mis-aligned rear wheel , as Krannie stated , the stock axle block markings are not correct and the wheel will be crooked when you think it is straight according to the marks , which would also account for your premature sprocket wear , , unless something is mis-aligned your clutch cable wear would be attributed to lack of lubing ,or improper lubing and the lube is not making its way all the way thru the cable housing (if it is not dripping out the end when you are done , then you are not done ) again (no offense) self inflicted issues , all i usually have to do is keep fresh gas in my bike and enjoy riding it , for the most part , my X has been more maintenance free than any 2 stroke i have ever owned in years past

As far as tire alignment , I measured from the swingarm pivot bolt back , then i made marks ,(on the swingarm and in the center of the axle on the axle blocks) and use those marks for alignment because variances in manufacturing can make the rear of the swingarm slightly different lengths per bike and per side , as far as chain slack i measure just behind the chain guide(on top) and use my fingers , 3 fingers is close enough no matter what size hands you have , pretty much the same way you measure a KTM , my chain lasts , and i am still on the original chain guide , as it has not worn out , and i do ride the bike so its not because it sits , its because i keep everything adjusted and check it frequently and parts just last longer that way , i lube my chain every ride , i use Motul Off-Road Chain Lube exclusively , i tried other brands and that was the result of my first chain replacement , i use a DID Non O-Ring chain , its been on my bike for several years , i use a Non O-Ring chain on my 450R as well , O-Ring chains are fine for street bikes , but not dirtbikes , they hold in grit , and that leads to wear , i dont care what the "experts" say

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I'm pretty much with Jim on this one. My '05 is 75 hours into its first top end job and going strong. I do change my oil more often than Jim and I'm on my second chain/sprockets. Original clutch entirely and second or third set of rear pads.

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so today i checked the valves, and both intakes are tight, so i will have to investigate that further. The starter had the wire come off a brush, even though the brush looks in good shape.

I did take the shock out and cycle the suspension. at its tightest spot i have about 1/4 inch of play, so i guess i was running it on the loose side.

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so today i checked the valves, and both intakes are tight, so i will have to investigate that further. The starter had the wire come off a brush, even though the brush looks in good shape.

I did take the shock out and cycle the suspension. at its tightest spot i have about 1/4 inch of play, so i guess i was running it on the loose side.

No, that's WAAAY on the tight side.

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Buy an XR650 or a DR650 or a WR250R for your type of riding. Your maintenance schedule and $ will thank you greatly.

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Rear pad and chain and sprocket life is totally dependant on the riding conditions, if its wet and muddy you will wear rear pads and chains and sprockets in no time.

Earlier this year we had heaps of rain and I often destroyed rear pads (OE and EBC) in 1 ride. The KTM boys had the same drama. In those conditions it also helps to clean and relube the caliper sliders each ride.

Your other issues are probably related to how you ride your bike.

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Buy an XR650 or a DR650 or a WR250R for your type of riding. Your maintenance schedule and $ will thank you greatly.

not likely, my 450r has been super reliable on my maintenance schedule

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not likely, my 450r has been super reliable on my maintenance schedule

I bet your maintenance schedule doesn't include 20,000+ miles between valve checks. The wr250r's does. I'm not doubting that your bike has held up, but it seems that the OP is wanting less time and money spent on maintenance. You're simply not going to get that on a 450r or 450x. It is possible to get that on other bikes though.

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just frustrated with crap going wrong on this bike, after my 450r being so reliable. I wouldnt drive a yamaha, not so much because of the brand but the local dealers, and not interested in tank either, they are no fun it tight stuff

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I bet your maintenance schedule doesn't include 20,000+ miles between valve checks. The wr250r's does. I'm not doubting that your bike has held up, but it seems that the OP is wanting less time and money spent on maintenance. You're simply not going to get that on a 450r or 450x. It is possible to get that on other bikes though.

He IS the OP !

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I think you might be over analyzing some of the issues , as the things we mentioned are common issues and common wrong ways of adjusting maintenance items , its not like we all have not had any issues , but some are usually self inflicted as a result of just doing 1 thing wrong and it sets off a chain reaction with other components , such as your chain and sprocket issues , to me having the wheel crooked will not only ruin the sprocket , but the chain as well , even wheel bearings COULD be affected if left long enough with a improperly adjusted wheel

and not saying you could have bought a lemon , every brand has a few , The RMX(the new one that was a 4 stroke not the old 2 stroke one they made in the late 80's and 90's) , modeled off the bike Travis Pastrana rode solo in the Baja 1000 , which was a RMZ450 and a DRZ hybrid (a bike that he ended up not finishing the race because of electrical issues they could never solve), well they recalled them all from the dealers , they are no longer available , because there was some bug in the wiring and Almost All of them were catching fire , it affected almost the entire production run of them , sometimes lemons slip thru

But for the most part the 450X is a sound bike , the Intake valve issues were a issue with most who owned them (self included) , it affected the R models as well , but the transition to Stainless usually solves that issue (5 years and no adjustment needed on mine yet) or changing the valve seat material , but its a issue most are willing to live with

Not saying that its all your fault , and not saying the bike is infallible , its just not common to have so many issues unless it is because of something your doing wrong when doing maintenance

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I bet your maintenance schedule doesn't include 20,000+ miles between valve checks. The wr250r's does.

One thing I'd like to point out is that the comparatively long intervals shown in the maintenance schedule in the WR-250R Owner's Manual is basically a generic service schedule based on street riding.

For example, how often does that chart recommend you service the air filter, or even look at it?

Every six months?

It also says to perform the maintenance tasks more frequently if riding in wet or dusty conditions, which means off-road riding.

I have owned a WR-250R, a WR-250X (the motard-styled sister model), and currently own a 2009 WR-250F (which shares practically nothing with the other two WRs I mentioned and is also one of those bikes that riders assume is a high-maintinance bike), and I do know from experience they're well-designed and can go a long time without having to perform any kind of overhaul if not used in racing-type conditions.

However, when ridden off-road regularly, you'll basically be performing the same maintinance tasks no matter what model bike it is, and you can count on it if you were to actually ride it as if you were racing it.

What I mean is, some riders believe they'll be just fine riding a WR-250R off-road regularly and not having to change the oil until 3,000 miles comes up.

My point is that there's a bit of a misconception based on that street-orientated WR-250R maintinance schedule.

At the same time, I do believe the Yamaha valve trains are very rugged, as my off-road-ridden-every-weekend 2009 WR-250F with at least 2,000 miles of trail use still hasn't needed a valve adjustment.

I have in that time, however, performed more than a couple air filter servicings and oil changes.

Edited by YZEtc

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