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2011 TE449 Suspension Setup

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Hi. Pretty new here and could use some help.

Went riding with an accomplished desert racer this weekend and traded bikes (we are the same weight, but he is much, much faster than me). My bike doesn't feel like either of his. Both of his bikes were much firmer in rebound and compression. This gave me a lot more confidence over whoops, in deep sand, and through rock gardens. My bike just seemed to wallow and feel vague. To quote him, "you will be unable to attack the trail as set up." Anyway, I know what the feel should be but wanted to know from anyone here who owns the bike whether I can attempt to replicate this firmness with the stock Kayaba setup.

Up to this ride I had already checked the stock spring rates for shock and forks at Race Tech. Given my age, weight, and riding style, the stock springs were quoted as being right on. Set the static and race sag. I then went to the owner's manual and set all compression and rebound settings to standard recommendations. From there, I rode a bit and upped the shock rebound three clicks tighter and went on the ride.

I've read the "Tuning Your Suspension" in the Suspension forum and it makes perfect sense to me. Bummer part is I can't get out on the bike again for at least two weeks to try it out. In the mean time, I was hoping for some advice or support from here. Will the clickers stiffen this bike up? I hope I don't have to send everything in to a tuner to get things "right".

Thoughts?

Edited by Gillies

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My TE511 is also loose in that type of riding. They are setup soft for DS. You will need stiffer springs and firmer valving for hitting high speed whoops.

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My TE511 is also loose in that type of riding. They are setup soft for DS. You will need stiffer springs and firmer valving for hitting high speed whoops.

Okay... You're on here a lot, seem respected, and have considerable knowledge. Please answer this, if you would: From Husqvarna's stock clicker settings, will it be possible to firm things up considerably by tightening the settings another 50-75% from there?

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Okay... You're on here a lot, seem respected, and have considerable knowledge. Please answer this, if you would: From Husqvarna's stock clicker settings, will it be possible to firm things up considerably by tightening the settings another 50-75% from there?

Never an issue twisting the clickers. Dial them firmer, should help. Simple to do. If you don't like the results click it back.

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With all those clickers, it helps to have a method. Here's what I do (given enough time)

  • Start with correct sag.
  • Set fork height - move forks up for quicker turning, move down for stability.
  • Set all damping softer than recommended
  • Ride. Find or make a loop that represents the stuff that you ride - with acceleration, turning, whoops, sand - whatever. But make your loop short - something you can do in 3 minutes or less.
  • Stiffen the rear rebound.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the front rebound.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the rear compression.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the front compression.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.

Repetetive? You betcha. But not only will your bike feel better, you'll know why it feels better, and you'll get some riding in.

Short version: Shock rebound -> Fork rebound -> Shock compression -> Fork compression. Focus on one at a time in that order.

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Never an issue twisting the clickers. Dial them firmer, should help. Simple to do. If you don't like the results click it back.

True enough. I'm being impatient, really. Want to fix my problems sitting at the computer, when getting out on the bike is what's really needed. I don't need the level of firmness my friend has. He's race pace, while I'm a trail rider. But it has got to get firmer than the stock settings for sure.

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True enough. I'm being impatient, really. Want to fix my problems sitting at the computer, when getting out on the bike is what's really needed. I don't need the level of firmness my friend has. He's race pace, while I'm a trail rider. But it has got to get firmer than the stock settings for sure.

Twist them and see. banda's method above is a good solid approach.

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Sound advice. Will do just as soon as I can get back out there.

With all those clickers, it helps to have a method. Here's what I do (given enough time)

  • Start with correct sag.
  • Set fork height - move forks up for quicker turning, move down for stability.
  • Set all damping softer than recommended
  • Ride. Find or make a loop that represents the stuff that you ride - with acceleration, turning, whoops, sand - whatever. But make your loop short - something you can do in 3 minutes or less.
  • Stiffen the rear rebound.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the front rebound.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the rear compression.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the front compression.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.

Repetetive? You betcha. But not only will your bike feel better, you'll know why it feels better, and you'll get some riding in.

Short version: Shock rebound -> Fork rebound -> Shock compression -> Fork compression. Focus on one at a time in that order.

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With all those clickers, it helps to have a method. Here's what I do (given enough time)

  • Start with correct sag.
  • Set fork height - move forks up for quicker turning, move down for stability.
  • Set all damping softer than recommended
  • Ride. Find or make a loop that represents the stuff that you ride - with acceleration, turning, whoops, sand - whatever. But make your loop short - something you can do in 3 minutes or less.
  • Stiffen the rear rebound.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the front rebound.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the rear compression.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.
  • Stiffen the front compression.
  • Ride again. Is it better? Stiffen it again. Repeat until you run out of clicker, or it stops being better.

Repetetive? You betcha. But not only will your bike feel better, you'll know why it feels better, and you'll get some riding in.

Short version: Shock rebound -> Fork rebound -> Shock compression -> Fork compression. Focus on one at a time in that order.

Very nice approach! I'll bet this would be good for finding the sweet spot on a new revalve also. But only if the springs are right. Very similar to the tuning advice given by Bruces Suspension.

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