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Basic skills to practice?

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Ok so I have a trials bike in decent condition. I have a few years experience in offroad and mx. I enjoy tight technical trails.

What skills should I work on? What drills can I do?

Is there a list of drills somewhere? Just watching videos doesn't explain what I should be doing...

Any help would be appreciated.

I'm taking the bike out Friday for a few hours ...

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Get the Ryan Young training video, it's excellent. cheers

I second this suggestion. Ryan is very good at breaking down the details about what he's doing. You may not be able to do it, but you'll at least understand it.

http://www.rypusa.com/

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it will take me about 5 years to get past the first 3 skills Ryan goes over in the basic video.. man does he make it look easy.

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Absolutey everything in trials is easier if you have good balance so practising that is a great place to start. Not necessarily engine off balancing in the garage (although that works) but just riding around and stopping often ... facing uphill, downhill, in a corner, anywhere. As your balance gets better, you will be able to stop for longer and then move on to another area. Then when you start going over obstacles, you will find that the balance practice you have done makes it a lot easier.

I taught myself right from the start to ride with a finger on the cltch ... so much so that I can't ride without it there now. Is an excellent safety valve - if things get out of hand, pull in the clutch.

Ryan's video is great, have learnt lots from that.

Most of all, have fun.

Andrew

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Absolutey everything in trials is easier if you have good balance so practising that is a great place to start. Not necessarily engine off balancing in the garage (although that works) but just riding around and stopping often ... facing uphill, downhill, in a corner, anywhere. As your balance gets better, you will be able to stop for longer and then move on to another area. Then when you start going over obstacles, you will find that the balance practice you have done makes it a lot easier.

I taught myself right from the start to ride with a finger on the cltch ... so much so that I can't ride without it there now. Is an excellent safety valve - if things get out of hand, pull in the clutch.

Ryan's video is great, have learnt lots from that.

Most of all, have fun.

Andrew

agreed, until you get the video (a must), peg time is your best friend just getting use to the bike, start with full lock turns on the flat, then do the same on a slight camber. also, something I have found far too much is many new riders bike set up is not good. If you can find an experienced rider to set your bike up for you, that will give you the best opportunity to excel. I have a practice area at my place an many riders come to play. When I see a new rider struggling the first question I ask is to possibly take their bike for a ride to see what they are fighting against. Far too often the bike is doing them no favours. A few adjustments make a big difference. cheers

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My best advice is come ride with other trials riders. Come check out the event this Sunday. Meet fellow trials riders and then come riding with us at our local riding spot next weekend. We're always happy to help new riders!

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guys thanks for the advice. I've been getting 20-25 minutes a day, of dead engine balance practice in the backyard. Very it's frustrating.

Chris I 'd like to come check it out, but this weekend is full. I will get to ride friday and thats only while the kids are in skool. Hopefully I can hook up with some trials riders soon....

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guys thanks for the advice. I've been getting 20-25 minutes a day, of dead engine balance practice in the backyard. Very it's frustrating.

Chris I 'd like to come check it out, but this weekend is full. I will get to ride friday and thats only while the kids are in skool. Hopefully I can hook up with some trials riders soon....

Don't give up on the balance practice! After a couple of weeks you will be a LOT better. I've had my trials bike for about 5 months now but I've only been seriously practicing balance for about a month or two of that, because a lot of the time I just want to go out and ride it around fast! In the beginning I was also really frustrated that I couldn't do balance well or anything else... It looks SO easy in the videos, why can't I do it?!

Well, I stuck with it and after a while 5 seconds of balance turned into 10, then 30, now I'm up to this:

! You'll probably notice that my wheel is turned, this makes balancing MUCH easier, give it a try. All the Pros can do it with their wheel straight, but I can't balance for much longer than 10-30 seconds with the wheel straight yet.

Another thing you can practice is small slow wheelies to work on being able to lift and place your front wheel wherever you want it. Try doing a small wheelie and landing your front wheel on a specific spot on the ground like a rock or stick.

As others have said, turns are good practice, too. The slower and smaller the better!

Right now the riding weather isn't so good, so I've been practicing stationary skills. I try to get at least 10-15 minutes a day of balance and hopping. Just about a week and a half ago I couldn't hop my front wheel at all. I could lift it but I usually landed out of balance. Now I'm stringing 10 or more hops together! Just keep practicing and it WILL come!

One other thing that REALLY helps is to video yourself and play it back in slow motion. It especially helps if you have a slow motion video of someone doing it the correct way to compare it to. If you aren't shy you can post the video on here and one of the guys will probably be able to tell you exactly what you're doing wrong. They really helped me with my double-blip practice!

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Agree totally with the wheelie and placing the front wheel where you want ... I use a few sqaures of plywood. Stop with the front wheel on one and then lift the wheel and place it on the second piece of ply. Is something I can do in my small rear yard. Found after doing this practice, I could place the front wheel on a log precisely so getting over logs was much more under control.

You will progrees much faster if you do spend time doing basics such as this and balance. Practising what you don't do well rather than what you do well will help. Mastering basic skills will make you enjoy your riding so much more ... you think it's fun now? Wait till you get further along. It's a real addiction!

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..............It's a real addiction!

Addiction??? :lol: Nope! I can quit it ANY time I want... I just don't want to.. :cheers::banghead:

OH HECK!!! Even TT is calling me an "addict" next to my Avatar!!! I need help..:)

NOT! :smirk:

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Well, I've been here at TT and the Trials Forum since way back when there was just a couple regulars and a big ECHO.. :lol: Now the room is full and busy at times. It used to be called the 4 Stroke Trials Forum until they realized that there were no currently manufactured 4-strokes in Trials.. but that started to change in 2004 with the Montesa. However, 2-strokes are still dominant. But then, a Trials 2-Stroke is a completely different animal than its MX cousin.. It's almost like they should be called 3-Stroke Engines.. :)

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A video I doctored with Toni Bou doing his thing.... I took some of the riding sequences and dropped the spped to 24% of original speed to help give us time to see his body input. This shows quite well the technique of jumping on the pegs in time with the throttle to get traction where traction is absent.

This aslo shows well the dropping of the knees to get the feet on the front of the pegs with each thrust of the bike as it gets traction from the downward jamming on the pegs.. It's possible to more than double your weight affect on the rear tire WITHOUT adding any mass. the only penalty to pay is a corresponding unweighting of the bike between each jump. But if done correctly, you almost float between each grip and glide..

Also note how he can affect the left attitude of the bike with his feet while his upper body remains relatively quiet and over his intended line while the bike dances..

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A video I doctored with Toni Bou doing his thing.... I took some of the riding sequences and dropped the spped to 24% of original speed to help give us time to see his body input. This shows quite well the technique of jumping on the pegs in time with the throttle to get traction where traction is absent.

This aslo shows well the dropping of the knees to get the feet on the front of the pegs with each thrust of the bike as it gets traction from the downward jamming on the pegs.. It's possible to more than double your weight affect on the rear tire WITHOUT adding any mass. the only penalty to pay is a corresponding unweighting of the bike between each jump. But if done correctly, you almost float between each grip and glide..

Also note how he can affect the left attitude of the bike with his feet while his upper body remains relatively quiet and over his intended line while the bike dances..

2Ply, that is a great video, but transferring that from the power and speed he uses to climb the steep slopes to slow-precise placement of the front wheel is a lot tougher. The hill climbs like that are not where I have issues, can't speak for anyone else though. I really need to find a local rider to help me with the Slow and controlled aspect. :lol:

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2Ply, that is a great video, but transferring that from the power and speed he uses to climb the steep slopes to slow-precise placement of the front wheel is a lot tougher. The hill climbs like that are not where I have issues, can't speak for anyone else though. I really need to find a local rider to help me with the Slow and controlled aspect. :)

The way he adjusts to stay over the sweet spot on the pegs is key to almost everything no matter how fast or slow.

How he stays detached but in control of the bike and not clamped to it allows him to place the bike where it needs to go without affecting his own balance.

If you hang on and brace yourself to the bike trying to use it for your own stability, you will end up leaning into turns and falling back or forward with power or braking, ultimately needing the handle bars to pull yourself back into position.

Relaxed and balanced independent of what the bike needs is the way to be in control so you can place the wheels anywhere you need. If you are struggling to maintain your "centered" place over the pegs, you will not be able to help the bike.

The video is to show this aspect of controlled body position that then allows you to use the pegs and bars as tools instead of just attachments for you. :lol:

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