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Thread repair

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Hey gang, I have searched through the forum about repairing a thread (specifically the rear thread on the powervalve spring cover on an 08 300xc) and have seen a lot of good advice, but I was wondering if that is a magnesium thread, if it mattered and what is the best way to repair that thread? I have seen helicoil mentioned. Any advice appreciated!

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I would start with running a tap back down in there. make sure it is a bottoming tap (full cutting threads at the very end, not tapered) otherwise you wont' be getting those last threads cut. blow the hole out good for debris in there, as well, after using tap. Flush with wd-40.

see if that helps. If not then you will be looking at another option. Make sure the bolt you are using doesn't have any damage to the threads as well.

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yeah -- follow above stuff first. If that does not work, then use either heli-coil, time-sert, or recoil thread repair.

I have used them all, they all work, just take your time, get it straight. I found a entire set of recoil thread repair on fleabay for about $130, but thats been a while. It had thread repair for about 6 different sizes. Money well spent.

recoil-fix-a-thread_39-1100.jpg

Search around for recoil part number 39-1100

It has both the taps, handles, and inserts of 6 different sizes in 1 kit.

I am sure other MFG also have kits like that.

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Have a look on ebay i picked up a helicoil set for around £15 all youl need is a drill.

Good little set i used it on a magnesium clutch case worked very well considering how bad the damage was (part of the case was actually snapped off, the helicoil was visible but still held strong)

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Helicoil, maybe it will help for some back ground info.

When aircraft were having issues with with threaded holes in aluminum they researched a for a way to strengthen the connection. The result was a stainless steel threaded insert. Every hole has them installed. Aluminum heads on a race motor has them installed when you buy the heads.

So if they make a new threaded connection better it stands to reason it's a great way to repair a damaged one.

Use the correct size drill, buy the kit with the tap. Keep it straight. It'll be better than new.

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