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Hey guys. im gonna start racing in a year or so(i know its kinda far away) and well i want my dad to be my mechanic.

my bike is a 2003 yz 125

my question is, in the time from now till i start racing do you think it would be easy enough for him to learn everything about the bike.

i also am going to learn everything with him but it will be easier to have him at the track to do all the stuff for me so i have time to prepare myself for the races and what not...

and if anyone has been a mechanic for someone do you have any tips for me and my dad?

Thanks Kurt

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Make everything right before the race and you shouldnt have too much to worry about. Really all you need to check is the chain, oil, airfilter(maybe) and fill it up. It does help to have someone with you. Even if they dont know anything about bikes

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With a 2 stroke like you have, maintenance is fairly easy, most of the time at the track you should only need to do small adjustments on things like suspension or chain tension. The other stuff you would need to learn would be rebuilding the top end every 30-40 hours which is easy to do for people with a little mechanical know how. Get a manual for your bike too its got all of the important info in there.

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Is your dad mechanically inclined? If he is it shouldn't be difficult.

I did everything my self and my dad would show up later in the day for moral support.

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boy i sure wish i had a dad to be my mechanic.

if i had to guess i'd just say come prepared well in advance according to the manual. bring extras like tubes, plugs, levers, cables, air filters, chain lube, various fluids you'd need, enough tools to do basic maintenance. don't bring too many tools, many times i've seen people rip their bikes apart at the track on a windy day where there is a lot of sand being blown around. terrible idea to rip into it that much at the track.

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I agree with gscx and that's what I do. The bike should be ready before you get there. At the track you mostly deal with odd ball things that come up usually because you wreck or hit something :-)

1. Flat tire

2. Broken Clutch or Brake Lever

3. Broken shifter

4. Broken throttle cable

Make sure to have spare spark plug, tubes and levers.

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Your bike is plenty easy to work on, diagnose and repair should there be any issues. Go through it top to bottom, with your dad, and you will both know it inside and out.

When at the races, take reasons to DNF and elminate them one by one. I don't race much MX, but I do a lot of off road desert and enduro racing.

Some of the excuses I have eliminated:

DNF due to flats - run a bib mousse up front and a UHD tube in the rear, with a spare front and rear wheel waiting in the pits.

Broken levers and cables - spares in the pits

Crushed pipe - tried a pipe guard, it didn't work, now I keep one ready to swap out.

Busted radiators - Got the BPD guards that should withstand a nuclear meltdown.

The parts are layed out on a table with the appropriate tools neatly layed out next to them. Quick changes every time.

That being said, I show up with a fully prepped bike, no surprises when I roll it out of the truck. I see a lot of people who roll the bike out of the trailer, untouched from last weekend, on race morning and are scrambling to get it ready.

Another tip would be to find a spare bike. Yeah, I know, we aren't all made of money, but keep your eyes open for a parts bike for cheap that you can strip down. Those special little nuts and bolts come in handy.

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With one bike and one racer, You and your dad should be just fine. When we go to the races I have three kids that race and one more to start this summer. It gets pretty hectic, trying to get to the gates, fix any problems before the next moto, and sometimes I actually have time to watch them ride. But, Like the guys above said. Make sure you have everything on your bike ready to go, and do several last minute checks the night before.. Good luck, and ride all you can. Have you rode on a track yet?

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I go to the races by myself. I am mechanic, rider, and race official (I do get replaced for that job during my motos though). If your bike is well prepped before the race, all you will have to do to it on race day is fill it up. Everything else can wait.

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I go to the races by myself. I am mechanic, rider, and race official (I do get replaced for that job during my motos though). If your bike is well prepped before the race, all you will have to do to it on race day is fill it up. Everything else can wait.

exactly....i get both of my bikes ready during the week and show up with only my gear my race bike, and my other race bike/pratice bike. and two stands and thats it...i never take any tools or spare parts...if you dont fill like your bike can make it through the race then you are doing it wrong during the week...i see people all the time show up to races with all kinds of tools and enough spare parts to build another bike....while they are scrambling to get there bike together before pratice im riding around on my pit bike having fun with freinds....only thing i do once i get to the track is crank both bikes as soon as i unload them to make sure they will start and run fine...after that they set under a tent untill pratice.

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Your bike is plenty easy to work on, diagnose and repair should there be any issues. Go through it top to bottom, with your dad, and you will both know it inside and out.

When at the races, take reasons to DNF and elminate them one by one. I don't race much MX, but I do a lot of off road desert and enduro racing.

Some of the excuses I have eliminated:

DNF due to flats - run a bib mousse up front and a UHD tube in the rear, with a spare front and rear wheel waiting in the pits.

Broken levers and cables - spares in the pits

Crushed pipe - tried a pipe guard, it didn't work, now I keep one ready to swap out.

Busted radiators - Got the BPD guards that should withstand a nuclear meltdown.

The parts are layed out on a table with the appropriate tools neatly layed out next to them. Quick changes every time.

That being said, I show up with a fully prepped bike, no surprises when I roll it out of the truck. I see a lot of people who roll the bike out of the trailer, untouched from last weekend, on race morning and are scrambling to get it ready.

Another tip would be to find a spare bike. Yeah, I know, we aren't all made of money, but keep your eyes open for a parts bike for cheap that you can strip down. Those special little nuts and bolts come in handy.

why dont you run a bibb in the rear?

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why dont you run a bibb in the rear?

Primarly the cost.

I get a lot more use than I should out of the front. I am cheap and will cut and stuff old sections in to make it last longer. Being the drive wheel, the bib wears out quicker and I don't really want to mess with potential problems. Instead, I run more air in the rear, sacrificing feel and performance for durability.

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