Jump to content

Fork Seal Grease

Recommended Posts

i just rub a bit of fork oil on them,i think that grease just collects dirt.i watched a guy put em in dry at area qualifier this spring.and when i asked him why,he said that the grease just collects dirt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i just rub a bit of fork oil on them,i think that grease just collects dirt.i watched a guy put em in dry at area qualifier this spring.and when i asked him why,he said that the grease just collects dirt.

That is one of the reasons I like to put a bit of grease on; it collects the dirt and keeps it stationary rather than working past the seal and into the oil. You'll get arguments in all directions on this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slickoleum good stuff

Grease the bushings and wipers but not the seal I use oil for the seal for reasons mentioned above

Edited by russ17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...when i asked him why,he said that the grease just collects dirt.

That would be my answer as to why I do use it. I assemble the seals to the fork using fork oil, but before sliding the dust seals in place, I run a 1/8" bead of Sta-Lube moly bearing grease on the tube between the two seal. Most of the dirt that gets by the dust seals gets intercepted by the grease, and my seals hold up better. Periodically, I pull down the dust seals, clean out the old, and apply new grease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i watched a guy put em in dry at area qualifier this spring.and when i asked him why,he said that the grease just collects dirt.

Guess he likes stiction....

doc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been using the race tech grease for the last few builds I have done for myself as well as some other people, and none of the bikes have had any signs of leaking. From what I have observed, I think the grease aids in stiction reduction, increases longevity of the seals, and aids in preventing the seals from leaking prematurely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I know this is an older thread, but suspension technology keeps moving on.

I'm going to try this stuff,...

 

http://enduroforkseals.com/id79.html

 

http://www.finishlineusa.com/products/suspension-care/max-suspension-spray

 

"Stanchion Lube is a liquid flouropolymer surface treatment. It is distinctly different and better for stanchion tube applications than solid flouropolymers like PTFE®/Teflon®.  Stanchion Lube will permeate the coated surface of your stanchions and improve the surface slip without leaving any messy, dirt-attracting residue!  Gives your new seals that "broken in" feeling from the get-go.  We recommend Stanchion Lube for all oil bath forks."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FinishLine bike stuff is usually REALLY low quality crap.

 

Also, no spray lube is ever going to "permeate" a hard chrome steel stanchion surface, or a good Type II or Type III Hard Ano aluminum stanchion surface.  They've been sniffing their own fumes a little too long if they think that's how it works.

 

A quick wipe down with any silicone teflon spray from Home Depot or Lowes after a wash and dry keeps mine slippery.  Don't spray any of this crap near your brakes either btw.  Use a shop towel.

 

Every so often some fork oil under the dust wiper helps too.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dow Corning number 55 Oring lubricant. Used predominately in airplane hydraulic cylinders.

Slick oleum works excellent for approximately five minutes.

Edited by E-TECH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dow Corning number 55 Oring lubricant. Used predominately in airplane hydraulic cylinders.

Slick oleum works excellent for approximately five minutes.

 

Everything I read about that is that it works by swelling o-rings.  Would have to know how it reacts with NOK and SKF seals to take a chance with it.  Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't moly NOT break down easily in oil?  The selling point of Slickoleum is that it doesn't F anything up on the inside of the fork since some will always slip up past the seals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well most fork oil contains a seal swell agent anyway example would be maxima it contains a lot.

I have not seen that Dow Corning number 55 creates any stiction long term, I do see that it stays in there much longer than slick oleum. It definitely does not F up anything inside the fork

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which is a compelling reason to stay away from the Maxima garbage!

 

My point is this:  is this stuff going to dissolve nicely in fork oil?  Or is it going to stay gummy?  The suspension specific grease like Slickoleum will dissolve.  Even if it's not the smoothest (debatable), it's the safest to use for that reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FinishLine bike stuff is usually REALLY low quality crap.

Which is a compelling reason to stay away from the Maxima garbage!

 

Careful, GHILL!  You're gonna be called out as a curmudgeon. :busted:

 

You guys all enjoy your Easter holiday. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which is a compelling reason to stay away from the Maxima garbage!

My point is this: is this stuff going to dissolve nicely in fork oil? Or is it going to stay gummy? The suspension specific grease like Slickoleum will dissolve. Even if it's not the smoothest (debatable), it's the safest to use for that reason.

Not to hijack, but sidebar this thread: I'm starting to hear more seal swell complaints like this about Maxima...so, what's your recommendation?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to hijack, but sidebar this thread: I'm starting to hear more seal swell complaints like this about Maxima...so, what's your recommendation?

 

Just OEM Showa or KYB.  Doesn't do anything weird.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×