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Standing & whiskey throttle. How to correct?

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Im trying to get in the habit of standing more while trail riding. However it seems when I do this I am much more likely to get whiskey throttle. I dont have a problem standing and going fast and straight. Its the tight and turning trails that give me a hard time. It seems like Im a hair away from ripping back on the throttle when I give it some gas. My body position is as follows, slight bend at the knees. Feet are in the middle of the pegs. Head is usually on top of the number plate. Arms, not sure.

Any tips?

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Sounds like you are still steering with the handlebars too much instead of with the footpegs. It also sounds like your body english is off. It should be real subtle, but try to think of leaning forward just a bit more when accelerating or riding uphill, and leaning back more when decelerating/braking or going downhill. If you stand enough, the proper body english/position will become natural (muscle memory).

Don't try to lock yourself into one certain position i.e., "slight bend at the knees. Feet are in the middle of the pegs. Head is usually on top of the number plate". When I see guys first trying to stand more, it looks awkward because they are focusing so much on what they are doing. Watch videos of the pro enduro guys and you can see how their body position constantly changes when riding.

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Arms, not sure.

I found your problem.

Arm position is extremely important. I suggest putting your elbows up and out to where it almost feels unnatural. The proper position allows you to activate the throttle by rolling your forearm instead of bending or straightening your wrist.

Also, stabilize yourself on the bike by gripping the seat with your knees (or just below your knees if you have long legs like me).

Also, anticipate acceleration changes. Move your weight forward when you get on the gas instead of hanging off the back. move your weight back when you are decelerating instead of letting all your weight transfer to your hands. Use your hands as sensors. Try to position the rest of your body to minimize the forces on your hands and stay centered over the pegs. There are execeptions to this, such as in sand whoops where you usually need to keep your weight back a little more.

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I think the positioning is a good point , try riding on the balls of your feet instead of the arches , it will give you more control of the bikes maneuvering and also loosen up your lower body ,dont grip so tight with your legs but more with your ankles , and your arms/hands should just be slightly holding on , not gripping for life , try to think of your grips as a Twinkies , if you squeeze to tightly on a Twinkie you squish it , and you have nothing left to hold on to , well if you grip to tightly it wears your arms/wrists out and you have nothing left , so you loose control because your hands now cant grip anymore because you squeezed to tightly , so you should not be holding on to your grips any tighter than you hold on to a Twinkie

The key to standing (its how i ride 98% of the time off-road and on the MX track) , is being relaxed , and just guiding the bike , not holding on for dear life , the key to relaxing is being comfortable on the bike in that position , if you have to , rotate your levers lower so they are easier to grab without contorting your wrists , mine point to about 4 o clock and 7 o clock depending on which side of the bike you are standing on , this helps a lot with comfort and being able to just move a finger or 2 to grab the brake or clutch without actually changing the position of your hand , elbows straight out , this is extremely important , and let the bike float under you , and dont forget to BREATH , when you get tense , then give a big exhale , just like you would when ready to shoot a gun , , let the bike do the work you are just along for the ride !

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I had this problem on my rm when I would get arm pump. Adjust the throttle cable so that it has a lilttle bit of slack in it. It doesnt take much to make a big difference.

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All good advice, I need to work on this too.

One of the best things that has helped me so far is to keep my wrist bent slightly back, as oppose to being straight or bent forward. This basically limits your wrist from rolling back and opening the throttle if you get off balance. Also, if you do get a bit squirrely, you have a tendency to straghten your wrist, as you death grip, thus closing the throttle.

Conversely, if your wrist is bent forward when you get squirrely and you tense up, your wirst will want to straighten, thus opening the throttle. Some say "when in doubt throttle out", which has saved me many times, but you want to be the one making the calls on "throttling out", not your wrist.

This feels unnatural at first, but has really steadied my riding through the rough stuff.

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At the end of the day, whiskey throttle, whether you're sitting or standing, comes down to holding onto the bars to control your body weight. You need to get your legs and core doing the work so your arms are relaxed. Bend the knees a little more when you're attacking trails. I read an article years ago by Dick Burleson that discussed the finer points of riding standing up. Basically, you really bend the knees and lean forward (think of a linebacker going in for a good form tackle) when attacking trail, but the problem is that stresses the leg muscles and consumes a lot of energy, so when the trail is easier and you're going into cruise mode, you straighten your legs more and allow yourself to stand more upright. This mode uses a lot less energy, but sacrifices control. The key is to be in the attack position before you need it, so that comes down to reading the trail rather than looking at what's right in front of your front wheel.

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I've had the same issue and whiskey throttle on a 300 is more than a little scary. Took a hard dismount once right off the back. Here is what has helped me:

I raised my bars about 15 mm

Added a little more free play to my throttle and also turned throttle tube down a little, full throttle is a little harder to get to but I rarely need WOT anyway.

Worked getting my weight more forward whenever possible and make sure my elbows are always 'hinged'.

Grip the tank more with my knees

Its helped quite a bit....

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Great info everyone. I do know that I am gripping for dear life with my hands. My hands and forearms get fatigued after riding for about 20 minutes. I forgot to mention I do squeeze with my ankles however it appears I'm still missing the overall body position. Thanks for the replies, gonna try this out next time.

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See the "When to squeeze" thread, find the sweet spot by body balance. It can be done by squeezing or being "loose" on the bike, it's just balance.

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That started as my thread, and 2PLY did us all a favor by taking it over. Getting the bars in the right position made all the difference for me as a total noob on a YZ250. My first time out, I felt like I was constantly falling off the back of the bike, and whiskey throttle was around every corner.

My formula for improvement was to stand balanced with my balls of my feet on the pegs and move my hands down to a position that was comfortable in the vicinity of the bars. I then adjusted the bars by selecting RC High bars and installing Rox risers in an almost completely forward position until the grips were centered in where my hands wanted to be without hanging onto the bars. That gives me a perfectly neutral balance position from which to move forward or back, depending on what I'm doing with the bike. Has worked great so far.

I'm 6'4", so the actual bars and adjustments required to achieve a neutral balance standing on the bike will likely be different for most people. But I believe the formula should work the same.

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It has nothing to do with stance or technique but one thing I do to avoid whiskey throttle is run a little more play in my throttle than I normally would on mx. When I had a WR the role on was slower and I ran a tighter throttle with virtually no play. When I got the KX that all changed. I like a little more play now especially when I get tired in those tight, rocky sections.

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Very helpful thread for this newb, my forearms were wasted from last Fridays second trail ride. I got my body position down for the hairpins, but when I stood up I felt like I was going to fly over the handle bars. I am going to try several of the recommendations and post back the results and hope it helps someone, thanks.

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my forearms were wasted from last Fridays second trail ride. I got my body position down for the hairpins, but when I stood up I felt like I was going to fly over the handle bars.

I feel like that myself sometimes. My son is 15 and he just about wears me out. He's 6 foot and about 145 lbs and can ride for ever plus he lifts weights also. He's all lean muscle. I've bought a Bowflex and started lifting and man what a difference. I should have done it years ago. I've been lifting for about 2 weeks and on our last weekend trip I rode 3 times as long each session plus more sessions. Of course, as the day goes on I fade sooner than he does but when I'm fresh we battle back and forth where before the weights I couldn't hang with him. As long as I ride I'll continue to lift.

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Very helpful thread for this newb, my forearms were wasted from last Fridays second trail ride. I got my body position down for the hairpins, but when I stood up I felt like I was going to fly over the handle bars. I am going to try several of the recommendations and post back the results and hope it helps someone, thanks.

Like it's mentioned in other threads, if you roll your feet back when braking then instead of needing to use your arms on the bars to keep yourself from flying over them, you just stand on the pegs! You'll also get a little more comfortable each time you ride, and as that happens you'll squeeze with your hands less. Seat time and good practice is all you need!

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Stand balanced on the pegs at all times, with no pressure on your palms or finger tips.

Hold the throttle and twist with the same motion as using a screw driver.

Works on all bikes, with any setup, for all riders.

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I'm a rookie so I'm just pass'n along wut a VERY experienced rider suggested...

...ur head always needs to be over the steering stem/bars...always.

...and work really hard on riding on the balls/toes of ur feet.

I know...easier said than done but it makes a BIG difference.

:lol:

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